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  1. From the local paper where the district took place. Proud to say, game 1 for me Saturday was my plate and although I had no idea during, but afterwards I found out I called a perfect game! Photo 2 is during the championship game where the one coach asked if a ball had hit the batter (it didn't) but my partner called me over to make sure. Photo 3 is an out call I had on the red team (the team that won the district) in the 6th when they scored all their runs to lock it up. The teams fans didn't like it, but this photo shows I got the whacker (funny how a still shot shows how NOT close it was )
    9 points
  2. [anxiously awaits @JimKirk to roll out his new mascot and the new Umpy plush toy made from recycled chest protector foam*] *The new Umpy plush toy is not NOCSAE approved.
    7 points
  3. This is when the ejection needed to happen. 10u there is no profanity, it's one of the 3 Ps.
    7 points
  4. The catchers that I've asked were all fine with it, except 1. I always ask first. But hey, let's make a deal. I'll learn to stop adjusting to catchers by touch, and you learn how use the word 'their'.
    6 points
  5. In the thousands of games I’ve worked, all over this great land, I have never had game conditions wherein I remarked, “You know, I’m thankful I have these polished leather (or syn-leather) shoes to keep my feet warm / dry / looking shiny & spiffy!” Never. If it’s to be a particularly wet, soggy, or messy (muddy, dirty) game, I use my New Balance Vaadu’s, which use a nifty vinyl “dragonskin” upper to repel water, be flexible, and ventilate. Otherwise, the only thing that determines which of other mesh shoes I’ll be wearing is: Turf or natural? I want a particular tread. How much direct sunlight? I don’t want my newest, blackest shoes to start fading (which happens to mesh shoes in the desert here). Otherwise, as far as keeping them shiny and spiffy, that impression is gone after the plate meeting, and to clean ‘em, I just hit ‘em with my trusty air compressor and then scrub the soles with shoe cleaner and a brush. Done! Actual, bonafide “umpire” base shoes are overrated.
    6 points
  6. If you believe them when they tell you "good game" you have to believe them when they tell you "you suck."
    5 points
  7. Actually the extra protection is in the back on purpose. With multiple of layers of mask frame, mask padding, skull shell and skull padding, All-Star testing found that was plenty enough force reduction in the front (and it is, partly, too, because force is reduced transitioning layer-to-layer). The extra padding in the back is for backswings. It was added because it felt there was not enough back there for umpires in standard padding skull caps. So the interpretation of having more padding in the back because that is the front side for catcher’s is incorrect. This was something that Stan Jurga, product development of All-Star emphasized, and that it came out of input at the MLB level and their own testing. So, yes, the umpire skull cap was indeed designed specifically for umpires. Hope that helps clear up any confusion.
    5 points
  8. I know the guy who runs the Mid-American Umpire Clinic. 🙋‍♂️ I’d be happy to answer any questions you might have. Who knows…reaching out and asking some questions about the clinic might have some financial benefit…
    5 points
  9. I don't know that I believe this story. Everybody knows ALL coaches listen and understand every word we say at the plate meeting AND are totally up to speed on all rules. Honestly, I don't know why we bother with plate meetings. I hate to say it, but I have cut out everything beyond getting a line up card, verifying home team, and starting the clock. "Are all your players legally equipped?" "Yes," says the coach as I look over at 6 different uniforms and a Mr. T starter kit on every kid.
    5 points
  10. I raised three catchers before I became an umpire. We always discussed how it was their job to make the pitch look good (optics) and to help the umpire see the strikes. I always preached a few simple things. 1. Don't make the umpire's job harder. If you try to "frame" or "steal" pitches, you make yourself an adversary rather than an ally. So if it isn't a strike, catch it and throw it back. 2. If you move your hand after you catch a pitch, you're, in essence, telling the umpire you didn't think that pitch was a strike. Why move your hand if it's a strike? The only reason to move your hand is to "fool" the umpire into thinking the pitch was a strike. Better that you just don't do it. 3. Reach out, get your thumb under the ball, stop the pitch cold and freeze for strikes. A good catcher will reach out and stop that pitch right when it's a strike. Don't let it travel or try to pull it back into the zone. When a ball goes "pop" against the pocket of the mitt it SOUNDS like a strike to the whole world. Pushing directly against the ball's momentum will cause that "pop" in the mitt and, more importantly, the momentum of the pitch doesn't push the glove out of the strike zone. 4. Frame with your body, not your glove. Try to catch the pitch as close to the center line of your body as possible. Move your whole body to the location where you want the pitch and keep your glove along the center line of your body. Sway your hips slightly left or right to keep the glove right in the middle of your body. If you reach side to side for the ball it looks bad (bad optics) to everyone in the park, so use your body to show you are not reaching side to side. This one is a huge pet peeve of mine as an umpire now that everyone is down on their knee/butt instead of in a crouch. (My kids all crouched full time). The current popular pose behind the plate (on a knee) fixes the catcher in place so they have to reach instead of having a little latitude to sway their body. A pitch off the outside black caught with a firm hand and a big "pop" in the mitt near the middle of a catcher's body looks more like a strike than a pitch in the white that a catcher has to reach across their body to catch. 5. Do your level best to make sure the umpire doesn't get hit with the ball. Block everything you possibly can stop, even if there isn't anyone on base. It's hard enough to call balls and strikes, but if the umpire behind the plate is dodging pitches it's even harder. Show the umpire that they can stay locked in their stance because you will do your level best to make sure they don't get hit. 6. Stick up for the umpire when they get it right. If someone on your team questions a pitch and you know it wasn't a strike, then say so. I personally find it gratifying when a catcher does this for me. I work hard on my zone and I try to be very consistent. It's nice when a coach questions a pitch in the fifth inning and I hear a catcher say something to the effect of, "Ump's right. He's been there all day, Coach". It's about building a rapport and that is done through establishing credibility. I try very hard to listen when I umpire to people that I believe have credibility. People who bark all the time just become background noise. When someone who has established their credibility with me takes a quiet moment to have a word, I always listen to them. That's what a catcher should strive to be.
    5 points
  11. I'm totally not joking. I have PTSD from combat and from law enforcement (treated and doing just fine, thank you). To me, umpiring is a way to focus my hyper-alertness and energy; it's an escape from always looking over my shoulder, visually checking every person I see for weapons, noting exits, reading body language for threats, etc. Plus, I have loved the game since I was little. It's a few hours where I'm just in love with the game and not worried about evil. It is genuine therapy for my PTSD. HOWEVER, evil is still real. Just because I have a few hours when I don't have to think about it does't mean it has disappeared. I was umpiring a college summer game last week in Nebraska. I had the plate, and when I work the plate everything outside the foul lines is completely tuned out. I seriously have no idea what people are saying because I'm so focused. And to be honest, this was the fastest game I've ever umpired and I wanted to be ready for anything. This was a close game with a lot of close calls (post game video review showed we got ALL of them right!). There was a lot of talk coming from the benches, but I truly had no idea what they were saying. If the ball is live, I'm focused on the ball! Between innings, the home team assistant coach approached me and told me the visiting team was making racist comments about the home team's center fielder, who was black. Despite a law enforcement career in which I spent almost my entire career in the ghetto and came to hold a very dim view of humanity, I have to admit I was a little shocked. He then told me what they said, which I will NOT post here. Suffice it to say, there was no room for interpretation; they were blatantly racist statements. I approached the visiting team head coach and told him about the accusation. I said that I had not heard the remarks, but if I had, the offender would already be gone. He said nothing and walked away. NOTE: I'm also a trained interrogator, and have been trained in reading body language, micro-expressions, etc. This is not voodoo; it's science, and I have been documented to be more accurate than a lie detector (93% per occurrence versus 77%, so I'm significantly better than a lie detector!). This guy's micro-expression and body language told me one thing: The accusation was true, and he knew who had said those terrible things. Even though the courts have found me to be an "expert witness," it's not in a baseball rule book. I'm not ejecting on that one, but I laid down the law, nonetheless. I'm new to this college summer league and I'm hoping to use it to break into umpiring in the NCAA, so I didn't want to become "That Guy" after my first game with them. But, racist remarks are very severe. Think about it -- I dedicated two careers to standing up for people who can't stand up for themselves. My spiritual beliefs are grounded in the idea that every human being is made in the image of God, and therefore has value. These acts were more than a simple insult; they were an attack on the fabric of what it means to be human. I simply can't stand for that. I called the assignor and told him what happened, and then told him my plan for the next game: If I hear it (and I tend to hear a lot more when I'm working the bases), I'm ejecting the offender immediately, no warnings. If I don't know who said it, I'm asking the dugout. If they happen to tell me, I'm ejecting the offender. If they don't tell me, I'm ejecting the head coach because he's responsible for their behavior. The assignor agreed, and then he called someone at the league and each team owner. I'm told each team had a come-to-the-divinity-of-your-choice meeting. Later that day, I was sitting in my hotel room going through my mental preparations for another fast-paced game, where I would be on the bases. I kept thinking about the injustice of it all, and it made me sick to my stomach. I mean that literally. I wondered if I was coming down with something or if it was being incensed at this whole affair. It was definitely the latter. It also didn't go away the entire game because I had no way of knowing what would be said next. To be honest, I was LOOKING for racist comments. We had some close plays (also 100% correct on post game video review!), but I was more worried about some idiot in a hood. There was a lot of bench jockeying again, but no racist comments. It's been nearly a week and I'm still angry about it.
    4 points
  12. Unless the runner did something intentional to get hit, we play on. If the deflected ball goes out of play, all runners are awarded 2 bases from their last legally touched base at the time of the throw (not the time it goes out of play).
    4 points
  13. I tried my scully for the first time this weekend. Upper 80s weather and not a cloud in the sky. As you mentioned about the sweat being held better, I know between innings, if I looked down with the scully on my head, I had a stream of sweat coming down the bill. So much sweat that I could actually knock the all of the dust of my plate shoes toes. Yes, I tried that once. Yes, I sweat a lot. But, I can't remember a bead of sweat entering my eyes all day or noticing sweat, that bothered me, on my forehead while it was on. Two thumbs up! I am a 7.5 hat size with that being the lowest side scale for the XL size scully. It wasn't a loose fit but I thought maybe it would jar a bit when doing a rotation. Nope. Stayed in place. Maybe it was the water tension from my sweat to my forehead holding it on, who knows? It does sit the mask a little up on the chin. That really is the only thing I noticed differently about it. Maybe with new pads, I would sit lower but I can get used to this. No more plate hats with extra protection and sweat control. Two thumbs up!
    4 points
  14. Bah. I took one to the bicep a few weeks ago (no bicep guard). I know it was 92 because I looked at the scoreboard ... really didn't want to know that. 😬 Took four days for the bruise to even show up. Maybe pasties instead of a chest protector, @umpstu? 🤣 (skipping posting an image)
    4 points
  15. Took two mask shots (one foul ball straight-back and one deflection off the batter when HBP) last night while wearing my AS Skully. Pitcher throwing low 80's in a Sr. Legion game. I was wearing a Wilson TI Low Profile with TW pads. I had no bells ringing, no spots flashing, no cobwebs to clear and no problems. I am convinced that the Skully prevented me from getting a concussion. Of course I felt the shots, but not nearly as badly as I expected to feel them. I didn't even get a headache. Count me as a believer in the Skully's protection. I fully endorse this product. It is cooler than wearing a regular hat thanks to the vents on the top allowing heat to escape and cool breezes to be felt. It catches and holds in your sweat better which keeps it out of your eyes. It was 95 at game time last night and I felt fine in the Skully. As an added bonus, my sunglasses don't need adjusted because my Skully stays in place once I put it in. Yes, I know the look is bit unorthodox, but change takes time. The more of us that wear these, the more they will begin to look more "normal" to the masses. As for me, I'll err on the side of safety versus simple appearance. But I'd recommend you get one of these, it just may prolong your career by helping you to avoid concussions and recovery.
    4 points
  16. Here is what I would ask myself: Am I eligible for a disability when I cut it off?
    4 points
  17. "Thank you."
    4 points
  18. That's the wrong attitude you have. Ice cream? That coach is obviously very smart, and sticking up for his players. At 8u, he already knows how big his players will get, how fast they'll be, that they'll continue with the game, what college they'll play for on scholarship, and their position in the draft. Don't deny the kids their pro contracts!
    4 points
  19. It’s 8u and the umpire was “pressed” after the game? Good lord, the coach should be worried about what flavor ice cream the kids want
    4 points
  20. 8U? Buy the kids ice cream and go home.
    4 points
  21. I often think a trained umpire is better off working solo than with an untrained volunteer -- especially someone who isn't smart enough to get out of being volunteered.
    4 points
  22. I hope @MadMaxis right . But Im afraid FED will fall on their “ HS baseball is for education ” sword and not limit conferences. Though personally I wish they would adopt the college rule. The “ only navy” guys will eventually figure it out.
    4 points
  23. Correct my partner? Hell no, she doesn't like that at all.
    4 points
  24. Way too much energy spent on shirt color. It doesn’t make you a better umpire and some guys don’t look good in any color.
    4 points
  25. Alright @Thunderheads ... If I can wear that navy shirt, I will work with you any time! 😁 While I do not disagree with you about the archaic nature of umpire uniforming (it's nice the fabrics are finally starting to change to meet our needs), I also have to say that I understand the need for a baseline. I agree though, there should be some options available. For example ... I can ask new partners what they want to wear and I get a response like: Black ... uh, which one? Light blue ... powder or Carolina? Which style? ... and we won't even get into pants ... !!! I am big on umpires matching, but it's too much to keep up with.
    4 points
  26. OBS in all codes. A fielder without the ball hindered a runner. The penalty will be the same in all: advance R3 (scores). Other runners are unaffected (they should have moved up). It will now be R1, R2, with the same number of outs (presumably 1).
    4 points
  27. Catcher turns as losing and shakes umps hand. https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2022/06/15/west-springfield-virginia-catcher/ Nice story. I wish this type of thing would happen more. Rather than the stories of umps getting their jaws busted.
    3 points
  28. It is a bit of a strange wording on NFHS’s part, but I like that they word it that way. Like I told the players, they couldn’t say “on the dirt” because the size of the dirt spot is not consistent from field to field. They really cannot say “on the mound” for the same reason. I believe the “approximately 5 feet” will encompass the slope of the mound in most cases. Additionally, you don’t want to cause fights over the difference between 4’11” and 5’1”. (Part of the reason I find it humorous when people cite 20 feet as a magic number for defensive positioning on a pickoff attempt. “I don’t have a balk coach; he was 19’11 1/2” from the bag!”)
    3 points
  29. This is not a balk in any code: "2010 SITUATION 8: F1, while on the pitcher’s plate in either the windup or set position, (a) adjusts his cap, or (b) shakes off the signal with his glove, or (c) shakes off the signal with his head. RULING: In (a), (b) and (c) these are legal actions, provided these movements of the arms and legs were not associated with the pitch. (6-1-1, 6.1.2D case book)" At one point in the past NFHS actually had (a) as a balk in one of their caseplays but reversed it thankfully. The pitching motion referred to in the above caseplay should say the "start of the motion to come set". Most of us call it a start stop when the pitcher aborts coming set but it also is used when the pitcher stops his motion to deliver. Paradoxically, while adjusting your cap would be allowed by FED, moving your hand to the mouth while on the rubber is called a balk with runner/s on. FED won't let go of that interp.
    3 points
  30. Sounds like the umpire was confused with the live-ball balk rule (might be trained for HS rules). With a live-ball balk, we either enforce the balk and have no pitch, or we ignore the balk (because the batter and all runners reached their advance bases on the play. In this play, because the batter fouled off the pitch, we enforce the balk (advance runners) and it's no pitch.
    3 points
  31. Pro 2a fella here.. I understand LL's rules and no I do not carry umpiring. I would not tell a fan outside in the stands they had to leave. But yes I would tell a coach its in the rule book and he must abide by it or not be here. I would also ask him not to make an ass out of himself because being here for his kid/s > him making a political stand at that time. Then again I also feel by purposely making gun free zones you just paint a target on everyone there that states "yep I am disarmed" Anywho.. Sad that that coach decided to do what he did by getting himself EJ..
    3 points
  32. It’s unfortunate and rare. It’s important you trust our inventory levels as they are synched real-time warehouse to website. I will research your order.
    3 points
  33. Mar 2 to May 26 -- 152 games. Of course, these were all volleyball.
    3 points
  34. You have gotten some good advice in this thread, but one I would add, which may have been stated and I missed: Not my job to get teams ready 30-45 minutes prior to the scheduled start time. Once you said hi to the coach and he gave you push back, let the TD handle the issue. He runs the tournament, so let him be the bad guy as your pre-game interaction set up this team to already be on edge. Not saying you actually did anything wrong, but perception is reality, and the reality to this team is you were pushing them. Had a coach set his catcher way out in a TB game a while back. Pitch went straight to the glove, no movement. Called it a ball, even vocalized the 'that's out' to make sure they got it. Coach whined 'he didn't even move his glove!' My smart ass retort? You're right! I'll call that a strike when you are up to bat, okay? Shocking... not another word about ball calls in the batter box... IAWE - Ignore, Acknowledge, Warn, Eject Ignore - You ignored way too many ball/strike complaints. Miss the first one, but then move on to: Acknowledge - let the coach know you heard him. How you respond is on you. If they are just chirping, I find a "I hear you coach" fixes the issue quite often. Others use the stop sign or that's enough, I don't wat to hear any more. When they move past this: Warn - Coach, we are done arguing balls and strike, or judgement or whatever. This is your warning. If you continue, you will be ejected from the game. Eject - He went past warning, now time to hit the showers. This coach hit the eject button long before you even got to the profanity in the 3rd inning. Nip their arguing early or send them away. You said the next game you had them, they were quiet... I wonder why? I have a short leash in tournament ball, especially when I watch other umpires not handle their business and then I get stuck having these coaches in the next game. End it fast or your day will be ruined.
    3 points
  35. Our local UIC says it best in my opinion: “Don’t suck, and if you do, do it consistently.”
    3 points
  36. Something you might consider, which has become more accepted recently, is to let the bench know where those outside pitches are so they don't have to ask. An occasional "That's out" tells them what you see. Another tool at your disposal is to point out were F2 is setting up. Both can help derail any nonsense from the rats regardless of the level. It also might be in your best interest to stay at HP rather than approaching a dugout. This can be perceived as being aggressive and can make some more on edge. I was taught the Ignore, Acknowledge, Warn, Eject (IAWE) approach to concerns on my strike zone. Your recollection does not include the acknowledging piece. My tool of choice is the STFU stare, which I hold uncomfortably long so I know the complainant sees my stare. As others have said, you regret more ejections not made than those made. When they beg to have their ticket punched you should cordially oblige them every time. In any case, you have now discovered that your day becomes immeasurably more relaxing when the first monkey is shot. The rest typically fall in line.
    3 points
  37. I bought the skully last summer as a "I'll try it out and unload it if I don't like it". I use a F3 mask with the Ump-Life harness. I freaking love this combination. I've taken some shots this year that resulted in gasps from both teams, and I not only didn't hurt, I barely even felt them. I did have an umpire friend tell me the skully made me look like a penis. I just retorted that I accomplished what he did without one. I'm a computer nerd for my day job, and if my brain gets scrambled, I'm SOL. If I could get equivalent protection *and* look good, I'd do that, but I just don't see that in current products, so safety is trumping aesthetics every time.
    3 points
  38. Thankfully, at least in my experience, this is not only an exception...I'd say umps like this are so rare I'd call this an abnormality. He doesn't even qualify to be an exception. He's a defect. If anything I've seen umps that are more apt to stop a play a bit too soon...which is fine at this level. As the offensive coach, I'm saying "F U" to the ump and telling my players to stop at the next base (AT MOST). No coach with any integrity, especially at this level, should have let the kids keep running...no player on my team would be crying after hitting a home run off the pitcher's face...he'd be crying at first base, with his parents consoling him then and there...live play be damned. As the defensive coach I'm saying "F U" to the ump and tending to my player...then I'm leaving...then I'm filing a formal complaint.
    3 points
  39. No, we’re not heartless nor inhumane. There is. Even professional baseball has an unwritten provision, established by Harry Wendelstedt – “Common Sense and Fair Play”. Even in a professional game, if a play imperils the life or health of a player, the umpires are given the latitude to call Time and immediately get the player attended to. Think: come-backer to a pitcher’s face. If they have this provision and latitude in the professional game, it goes without saying they’ll have it in the amateur game.
    3 points
  40. The guy at 3B would not be disputing a safe call. There would be someone coming from either the 1B or 3B dugout. We might still have a live ball depending on the interaction and whether play was relaxed.
    3 points
  41. Weird, dumb double ejection in 14U baseball. Both teams decided they were going to go with straight-nine lineups and substitutes in our weekly league (they don't have to. As umpires in this league, we don't even keep the lineups)... well, the discussion at the plate meeting was surrounding the designated hitter and we ended the meeting thinking that both coaches understood how the DH worked and what it meant for substitutes. Apparently, it was not understood. Fast forward to the 4th inning, Team A is ahead by 3 runs and makes a pitching change. The kid who was slated at the DH is now warming up on the mound. The previous pitcher is out of the game. Everything should be up to speed. Team B's coach comes to me and starts questioning whether new pitcher can be in the game. I told him yes. He kept disagreeing. He saw our league director, so to appease him, we brought the league director in to make a decision. Now, mind you, this was between innings. The kids were warming up, and now, we have to stop the game to get a ruling on procedural moves and the kids are just waiting around and parents getting agitated. The league director, myself and my partner conference, and we tried to keep the coaches away so we could come to a decision. While making a decision, the coaches begin shouting at each other. The director quickly makes a call so we could tend to this new situation... the new pitcher was allowed to stay in the game. But as my partner and I tried to get things settled, the coaches were still shouting at each other. Team B's coach offers his choice form of the F-word, and my partner runs him. In response, Team A coach then shouts his favorite form of the same word, and invoked the other coach's mother into it... so I run him. The league director did a marvelous job getting them to head out to their vehicles and allowing us to move the game along. All regarding a lack of understanding and agreement on how to use the DH. So dumb.
    3 points
  42. They're still trying to figure out the latest dh rule
    3 points
  43. I don’t work college, but I’d never do this in a HS game. They aren’t supposed to touch us, and we aren’t supposed to touch them unless absolutely necessary. The optics here don’t look great to me. The push/contact is fairly aggressive and prolonged, and he’s running with him. I would maybe try to verbally get him to move (which he was, he wasn’t just standing there, but the umpire didn’t see if he was going to start jogging at all), but I wouldn’t do what he did here. Seems to be a bit overzealous. But again, if this mechanic is taught in college, so be it.
    3 points
  44. How the hell do you call the runner safe?
    3 points
  45. 10U... assuming rec league skill sets, I call 'hittable' pitches strikes within the boarder of the knees at the bottom and the armpit at the top and pretty much line to line assuming a 4" box offset. 10U travel or select where they actually can often times pitch? I call a less favorable to the pitcher zone. Rec league, no one came to watch little Johnny walk... as long as the zone is reasonable, the batters will swing, occasionally they will hit the ball, people will cheer, kids will run, fielders will field (or not), things will happen and maybe, just maybe, fun will ensue.
    3 points
  46. Mr. JonnyCat, the BRD does, indeed, give examples of visual interference except they are shown in the section titled Obstruction: Visual: Defensive and is in section 376 of the 2016 BRD. Also, here are a couple of examples found in another interpretations manual-- From the 2021 Minor League Baseball Umpire Manual (section 6.22, pp. 114-115): Runner on third base, one out. Batter hits a fly ball to right-center field and the runner goes back to third base to tag up. Third baseman approaches the runner, faces him, and jockeys back and forth, intentionally trying to block the runner’s view of the fielder catching the ball. Ruling: This is obstruction under Official Baseball Rule 6.01(h)(2). The umpire should call the infraction when it occurs and award bases, if any, in the appropriate manner. With a runner on first base, the first baseman—rather than holding the runner in the traditional manner—jockeys back and forth in front of the runner, several feet to the second base side of the bag. In the umpire’s judgment the first baseman is doing this intentionally to block the runner’s view of the pitcher. Ruling: While Official Baseball Rule 5.02(c) allows a fielder to position himself anywhere in fair territory, if the umpire deems the fielder’s actions are a deliberate effort to block the runner’s view of the pitcher, it is illegal and clearly not within the spirit of the rules. The first baseman should be warned to stop, and if he persists, he is subject to ejection.
    3 points
  47. Credentials don’t matter $h!t in a game. Even if a member of the crew is the Crew Chief, that title holds largely administrative and ambassadorial responsibilities. Unfortunately, NFHS still deifies the PU as some kind of overriding, final-say, word-is-law overlord. Now, at the amateur level, can your call of INT be rectified? Sure. It’ll be messy, and it prompts the discussion that you shouldn’t have made that call from the start, and should not / will not going forward. But it certainly doesn’t require that dude to start proclaiming his (perception of his own) virtues. 🙄 This call of “Balk” is your anchor point, the fulcrum that everything else you two are about to discuss works upon and around. So… Rules knowledge is sorely lacking, with all participants… the umpires included. If this had been OBR, which it wasn’t, but let’s say it was, this play result would have nullified the Balk. It must be said, tho, there is no option – no declining or accepting. However, this was NFHS Rules… surely somebody knew this, right? The Balk call immediately kills the baseball (thus, no pitch), and it must be enforced. R1 is advanced 1 base and is awarded 2B, and the batter resumes his at-bat with, again, no pitch added to the count. But then, your BU partner – who called the Balk in the first place – returns R1 to 1B??!! He, in essence, “cancelled” the Balk. So (in essence), if he’s not going to enforce the penalty, then why call it??!! Yes, I’m feigning histrionics here. What you’re admitting to, and I do acknowledge and respect that you are admitting to it, is that you let him get away with this idiocy!!! Listen, there’s something to be said about “getting a call wrong” (a mistake), or “poor/rushed judgement” on another, but when one umpire misapplies a rule or makes-$h!t-up-as-a-rule, and then another umpire or the crew is complicit in it, and doesn’t correct it, then the game is damaged. Professionally and personally, I don’t care my partner’s credentials or experience, I’m going to correct the rule, right then and there on the field, before we proceed. While I certainly can control how I go about it (scalpel vs sledgehammer), I cannot control how resistant the guy becomes or how embarrassed he may feel as a result of it. The plain simple truth is – the correction must happen.
    3 points
  48. According to the book A Game of Inches by Peter Morris there were newspaper accounts of outfielders juggling fly balls in 1879. The trick play did gain some adherents throughout the 1880s. But as most things in life are interconnected so too was this action. Starting in the late 1880s and becoming almost universal in the 1890s, most players started using gloves. This made the practice of juggling the ball back into the infield too difficult. Though there are accounts of it happening it wasn’t a big problem. In fact, the rules committee didn’t see fit to make a rule against it until 1920. Rule 56 Sec. 10 gave base runners the right to advance as soon as the ball was touched by a defender— “A base runner who holds his base on a fly ball shall have the right to advance the moment such fly ball touches the hands of a fielder.”
    3 points
  49. I was told by a current D1 umpire there was a time we could get this out because we were “ umpiring for the dugouts”. Now, every play of every game is video taped. Either officially or by Mom and Dad. We can no longer umpire for the dugouts, we umpire for the cameras.
    3 points
  50. My non-authoritative opinion (rub those two nickels together!) ... To write a rule specifying what is or is not allowed is pretty difficult because there are so many different things that can happen. There are too many things that aren't anything until something else is something. I would recommend treating this as you would any obstruction on the base path. The act of straddling is, in and of itself, not obstruction just as the act of a fielder standing between two bases is not obstruction. What you need to ask is "did the fielder's actions cause a change to the runner's actions?" We really need to focus on the actions of the runner rather than the actions of the fielder. A first baseman straddling first base for a pickoff move and leaving the "front" of the bag open is not denying access to a runner who is diving back into the base; no obstruction. A first baseman straddling first base on a pickoff move could be denying access for a runner coming back standing up; possible obstruction. If there is nowhere for the runner's body to go, the runner suddenly checks up and starts to stab his foot in to avoid contact ... obstruction. Simply providing access "for the runner's foot" is not adequate, the fielder must not deny access to the runner. ("The fielder without possession of the ball denies access to the base the runner is attempting to achieve.", 2-22-3, NFHS. 2020 NFHS Baseball Rules Book . NFHS. Kindle Edition.) A fielder cannot dictate the actions of a runner on the base path. A defensive coach cannot argue "the runner had access by going around" ... so why would we allow the fielder to dictate the runner's actions going into a base? IMO, the verbiage "deny access" should be stricken from the book as too many people read it as "there is A way for the runner to get there, so it is OK." You wouldn't build a house with no doors and say "the windows are access enough, climb through."
    3 points
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