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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/16/2021 in all areas

  1. I liked how the broadcast didn't have the strike zone overlay up the whole game and only went to it on "close" pitches. I found it refreshing.
    5 points
  2. It's all gonna depend on the partner. Some guys don't want to know, or be told. If I'm not "feeling it" for some reason, I'll outright ask my base guy if I'm killing the pitcher or the batter, depending on my gut tells me. Sometimes they agree, sometimes they say it looks good for the level. I don't ask all that often, but it DOES happen. I've had partners say something unsolicited, too. THAT'S not a good feeling, but I personally would want to know. My opinion? It's good partner behaviour. But you'd have to know your partner well enough to know how he'd take it.
    5 points
  3. My front one is flesh-colored.
    5 points
  4. Adding to @tpatience's excellent advice, request an extra-strong stitch, and/or eliminate as much extra material from the tucked-up hem as possible. This prevents it from snagging on the shin guard plates when you crouch and extend, crouch and extend.
    5 points
  5. Not the standard mechanic. Your old-school subtlety is passé. From HOK, after PU calls "ball," stand up suddenly, throw hands in air, and turn to outfield, vocalizing "for füch's sake."
    4 points
  6. I find that if you stand in B or C with your hands on your knees, drop your head and shake it slowly back and forth after a "ball" call, it really helps take the heat off your partner. /s <--- added for the humour impaired
    4 points
  7. My biggest issue (as an association assignor/past President) is the closely related, "that's not how we did things in (insert geographic location)!" The implication being that our association is doing things incorrectly because that's not how said umpire's prior association in said umpire's previous geographic location did things. I live in one of the fastest growing areas of the country (South Carolina). We have people (and umpires) who move here from all over the country (especially the northeast and upper midwest). Every year we get a number of "new" umpires who want to join our association. They provide us with resumes that state they have umpired high school for numerous years, have worked the playoffs for numerous number of years, etc. In other words, they submit a really strong umpiring resume for working high school baseball. And, we are genuinely excited to have them (I think every association in the country in this day and age would be glad to have them as we all want to grow.) Unfortunately, I know in the beginning of the year that a number of them will wash out "because we don't do things the way they did it back in (insert geographic location)." For example, one year we had a guy quit because he was adamant that back in Michigan the base umpire in a two-man (baseball) crew had to wear a ball bag. I told him that he cannot wear a ball bag on the bases (nor could he go to the mound and brush off the rubber). He was adamant that he had to do these things and that we were wrong and he left. Other times they argue and argue because we do not use the FED mechanics manual (we've been using the PBUC/MilBUD manual for 20-years with great success). Other times they complain because we assign a specific umpire to the plate and another to the bases each game...and they are not allowed to switch. And, there are a million other reasons, and I've heard them all: complaints about what uniforms we wear, how we assign umpires, our training requirements, our testing requirements, etc. All of those topics have been the subject of a sentence uttered by a new umpire which ended with, "...that's not how we did it back in _______________!" A lot of these guys will give up working in our high school association and will go work travel/rec ball where there are no evaluations nor standards which allows them to do whatever they want. I just don't get the mentality of an umpire coming into our association (or any association) of 70+ members and thinking that we should be doing things the way things are done back in Texas (or wherever) because, "by GOD, that's where I'm from and that's how it should be done!!!" The bottom line is, "when in Rome, do as the Romans do." If I, personally, were to move to another state tomorrow and I desired to start umpiring in my new state and the local high school association told me that they strictly follow the FED mechanics manual, (after laughing under my breath) I would say "okay" and would never say another word about it. I'm afraid that too many of us in my hypothetical situation would say, "well, back in South Carolina we would never use these stupid FED mechanics!"
    4 points
  8. When you get them hemmed, wear your shoes and shin guards so they can be properly measured. I make sure that the bottom of my pants are almost touching the ground when standing straight up
    4 points
  9. He did not - he was signaling well before the ball landed.
    4 points
  10. The problems start here. Right or wrong, we can't allow that, and it's more likely fishing for a call. "Knock it off, now." Now, instead of ejecting him for violating the instruction you should have given, you look like his lap dog. Not only is fishing allowed today, but he gets you to come to him. This, we can ignore. It's mere venting. That's not ignoring. Did you offer him a backrub while you were over there? You said you were busy officiating the game, which they already knew. They probably knew the count just fine, and were just trying to disrupt F1's rhythm. I expect they had some laughs back in the office about how in your head they were. Answer questions, ignore statements. But don't ignore disruptions. It seems to me that you might have an issue with caring too much (that is, at all) about whether and how much coaches like you. None of them like you. Some hate you. That's OK, because you don't have to listen to the whiney kids or their parents.
    4 points
  11. Nope...even the mlb.com website calls it a force. It is, for all intents and purposes, a "force" even if it doesn't meet the According to Hoyle definition of a "forced runner". Except for it's name, and that semantical distinction, is the batter/runner going to first different from any of the forced runners he creates? He can be put out by tagging him or the base...and if he makes the third out no runs score. And can he go anywhere else? He can't go back and bat again. The biggest/only difference is there is nothing that can "unforce" the batter/runner. He's forced to advance to first by the on-deck batter becoming a batter. All it does it creates confusion for newbies, and allows us in the know to go "haha, I'm smarter than you." It's pretty ridiculous if you ask me. Even elitist, to a degree.
    3 points
  12. The second base umpire told me (and the other hundred or so students at his umpire school) that he missed the dropped ball call. As I recall Joe telling the story, he went up to Haller (who had nothing to do with the play) between innings and asked him for his opinion about the no call on the possible interference by Jackson. Haller said (to paraphrase), “you guys got that right, but you kicked the SH*# on the intentional dropped ball.” Brinkman said he never even thought about an intentional drop ball until Haller brought it up. Brinkman said he became dejected after speaking to Haller and worried the rest of the game that he was going to get raked over the coals for missing that call. He said he was very relieved when all the post-game discussions centered around the possible interference by Jackson (because he knew they had gotten that correct) and the possible intentional drop was never raised.
    3 points
  13. Is that like nails on a chalkboard for anyone other than me?
    3 points
  14. I’m really diggin’ Mark Carlson (in AL WC) and Dan Bellino (Game 1, ALDS) actually vocalizing pitch locations, in addition to calling “Ball”s. “Out”, “Low”, “In”… “No, that’s up”… at one point, Carlson clearly says “down and out”. Huh! So that means those evaluators and feedback “dishers” saying “Don’t say pitch location. Big League guys don’t give pitch location, why should you?” are full of 💩. And I was especially keen on Bellino whippin’ a new ball out there on a ball exchange. No bellowing of “Time!”, no needless mechanics. Zunino is flippin’ the potentially scuffed ball to the dugout, and Bellino’s got a new one already enroute to the F1. Three cheers for situational awareness.
    3 points
  15. Yes, upon further review F1 stepped off.
    3 points
  16. I have the most recent version of the Hongis Plate Coat. They have a new supplier now other than Hardwicks. I picked it up this past February. The turn around was very fast, as they do have standard sizes in stock. You can get on in 3-5 days./ I also had them put my uniform number on the sleeve. This also makes the jacket non-returnable so make sure you have the size right if you are having a number added. Once you place an order, they will have you verify your shoulder and chest measurements with chest protector on. Coats come in Long and Regular sizes, no short lengths.
    3 points
  17. Cardinals-Cubs, late in the game, lead run at the plate? Imma go with "no one's lungs are strong enough to get heard" in that situation. I had 2 IFFs this weekend with 14ish year olds, and a smattering of parents, with no other fields around. No one heard, or paid attention, to me, either. At some point, one has to also look at players - who've been playing the game for 15, 20 or more years at this point - and say "you're a nitwit, and you F*#Ked up."
    3 points
  18. Get both! Call the entire zone! And, ... don't worry about what people THINK .... you're going to hear stuff REGARDLESS of how perfect you are on any given day, so, ...why worry about it? Right?!
    3 points
  19. Right- Navy Left- Black Back- Charcoal Optional Front- Heather
    3 points
  20. The top should be the midpoint between the shoulders and waistline. The letters are a good frame of reference, but at least in my area of the country coaches seems to want us to get the low strike than venture up into the high strike. I generally use the bottom hand of the batter, I have found it gives a good frame of reference to the midpoint unless they have a weird stance. Then of course I get out my tape measurer from my 3rd ball bag that I wear hanging off the back and get an exact measurement.
    3 points
  21. You mean like all the ex-MLBer's who are in broadcast booths all over the continent and on a nightly basis get at least one rule wrong...each.
    3 points
  22. Gotta love Fall ball. As new catcher approaches the dish...... "Coach, I'm not wearing my glasses!" "Oh, don't worry about it" Me: (*#$#%!) Pictured: My newest Jr umpire on the dish. 11 year old Doug Harvey's great grandson. .
    3 points
  23. Maven already said this, but I think it bears repeating (and emphasizing). Don't run over to a coach, especially not an AC, and especially not to discipline (which is what a warning is). Now of course, a manager coming out when he is permitted to is a different story. If he's calm as he comes out, I have no problem with you meeting him half way, but you should NOT go the whole distance. Additionally, there are ways to have conversations with coaches that don't make you look, like Maven said, like their lapdog. Call them over and pull out your lineup card, or catch them in-between innings as they are walking past you. Just don't go to them. These situations should have been handled from the spot you were when they occured. "C'mon, Blue! That's a balk right there! All day! Let's go". Depending on the temperature of the game, I might respond something like "I don't have a balk/That's not a balk" (depending on if I know what they want to be balked) or "Hey! None of that." Regardless, that's definitely an inappropriate comment for a base coach to make, so If they come back with something, I'm shutting it down for sure (but again, the temperature of the game determines the exact response). Importantly though, I didn't move. The coach was in the wrong, so I don't care if everyone hears the exchange, he was the aggressor.
    3 points
  24. Look, man. Players get the money, the women, the fame, the drugs. Throw us a frickin' bone, here.
    2 points
  25. Reviving this, Adidas with brown Belgards and Zett.
    2 points
  26. Hi all, new to the site but certainly not new to the Blue. Umpiring for about 15 years now all levels (except Pro) Now I'm retired and living in South Florida volunteering my time to the kids of my city. I hope to be able to learn as well as advise in any way I can. Call em like you see em!! Cheers , Johnny Rotten
    2 points
  27. I haven't seen it, and can't answer a question about a judgment call without the video. I gather that the runner touched the base when he slid in at first, then stood up on the 1B side of the base. Regarding the rule: if the umpire judged that the runner retreated behind 2B, then yes, he'd have to touch it again on the last time by or be liable to be called out on appeal for missing the base. If the umpire judged that the runner did not retreat, then he could not be called out for a missed base appeal. In any amateur game, if all the runner did was stand up after touching the base, I'd never rule that he had retreated behind the base.
    2 points
  28. Fed Interps 2010: SITUATION 7: B1 lays down a bunt that is fielded by F2 in fair territory a few feet in front of home plate. As B1 is 60 feet from home base, he is running outside the running lane with one foot completely in fair ground and not touching the lines of the running lane. F2 fields the ball and (a) attempts to throw to first but throws high into right field as he tries not to hit B1, or (b) does not attempt a throw. RULING: B1 is required to be in the running lane the last 45 feet to first base when the ball is fielded and thrown from an area behind him. In (a), this is interference and B1 is out and the ball is declared dead. In (b), since there was no throw, there is no interference. F2 is not required to hit B1 to demonstrate that B1 is out of the running lane, but a throw must be made for the interference to be declared. (8-4-1g
    2 points
  29. This positioning is optimal. Associations around here at the HS level teach the deep C, but that positioning runs counter to both angle and distance for any plays anywhere but 2B. It also allows you to stay out of the throwing lanes to 1B when F6 or F5 are charging a ground ball. The position may be a little hairy with a screamer up the middle, but the odds are in our favor that the ball is headed somewhere else.
    2 points
  30. What is this, softball? You said “JC ball”… Typo? J_V_ ball? A Junior College game, even “fall ball” stuff, is relegated to a poor, pathetic skinned infield? Ugh. Obviously, level / intensity of play influences a lot of this positional decision; however, there is a recent Ex-MLB Umpire here in Phoenix who is encouraging us to “get out of our comfort zone” on these situations and we’ll find the following positioning to be to our benefit – in terms of being in, seeing, and selling calls – than to our hazard or peril. What he’s advising, with the infield in, is a position I’ve called the C-Hatch-Cover. Typically (for here), there is a sprinkler head or hatch access cover to the hose outlet about 3 feet behind the mound. The BU takes up a position, hands-on-knees (ie. Ready) with his left foot behind this hatch cover (maybe another 3-5 feet), shaded to C. The F6 should be off to his right and behind. This is not a position for the cowardly lion, nor for the sluggish-of-shoe. This does, however, put you in a much more engaged position, able to turn and see a lined ball enter the glove of all 4 infielders, especially of F4 and F6. You are also able to maintain a much better angle for a backpick (from F2) to F5 upon R3, you are more responsive to a hotshot being cutoff and a throw or tag attempt made upon R3, stuck between 3B and HP, and if R3 is either frozen to 3B or he’s to the HP such that the defense abandons a play on him and then throws on to 1B, you’re already in a better position than at C Deep. Consider it.
    2 points
  31. I agree with everything stated, except this to the following extent. Umpires can certainly declare an IFF after the dust settles, and should. It certainly can create a cluster, confusion, and temporary uncertainty for runners if no umpire signals or verbalizes the IFF call, but and IFF is an IFF. It either happened or it didn't. It's the batted ball that creates the IFF, not the signal or shout by the umpire while the ball is still in flight. Assume base coaches keep R-1 on 1st and R-2 at 2nd because of the IFF (batted ball which can be caught by infielder with ordinary effort--no umpire makes any call whatsoever). Ball drops untouched, F-6 throws to 2nd, F-4 tags R-2 standing on the base, F-4 then touches 2nd base to retire R-1 on the force, and then throws to F-3 to retire BR. Triple play?? Nope! "Hey, Mike, that was an IFF!" "Oh, Geez, you're right, it was . . . R-2 is safe at 2nd, R-1 is safe at 1st, and batter is out on the IFF!" Embarrassing? Yup! The right call? Yup!
    2 points
  32. The answers are correct, but look at the situation by taking the confusion of the uncaught pop up out of the equation. Bases loaded. Ball hit which was not caught in flight for an out. Runners are forced to advance, including R1. 2nd base was touched/tagged by defensive player with possession of the ball prior to R1 reaching 2nd base, OR R1 who is forced was tagged by a player with possession of the ball prior to achieving 2nd base for a force out. No run can score when the 3rd out is made on a force. Just connect the dots and sometimes the answer is easy to see when you remove the oddities of a somewhat broken play.
    2 points
  33. How about just call the zone? That's a novel concept. GET STRIKES and stop worrying about being hollered at.
    2 points
  34. Get the hollow! To quote @noumpere from a past post.... Strikes --> Outs Outs --> Innings Innings --> Completed Games Games --> Paychecks Paychecks --> Beer Beer --> Sleep Sleep is good. Call more strikes.
    2 points
  35. I never thought I'd say this, but you need to spend more time on the Internet. From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irony_punctuation ... "It is common in online conversation among some Internet users to use an XML closing tag: </sarcasm>. Over time, it has evolved to lose the angle brackets (/sarcasm) and has subsequently been shortened to /sarc or /s (not to be confused with the HTML end tag </s> used to end a struck-through passage)."
    2 points
  36. Also when you are being measured look straight ahead. If you have your head tilted down to look it will pull the rear portion up slightly giving the appearance that the hem will be correct. When they sew it the back will be too long. I know this as I was a Recruit Company Commander, Navy drill instructor, for 3 years and saw it all of the time.
    2 points
  37. As an umpire, I'd rather you did deal with it, however you choose to (other than to celebrate it). I bristle at partners who project their own "moral and ethical code" upon a game, and I especially get annoyed at evaluators / upper-level-umpires who decree "you (as an umpire) have to get that, you have to address that, you have to warn/restrict/eject for that!" I once was doing a varsity High School game between two Catholic schools (shame, I'm Non-Denom Christian... or maybe that's more advantageous?) and after striking out, the batter drops a big "F*#k me!" as he heads towards the dugout. It wasn't directed at yours truly, but it sure was loud enough for the fans to hear, among them the very nice nun sitting in "summer uniform" in the stands between the plate and the dugout. I didn't bother to try and chase the kid down, or yell at him with his back turned, or warn him, or eject him... I simply locked eyes with his bench coach, pointed at the retired batter, and said, "He can't be doin' that." Bench coach replies, "I got it!" Guess who was removed from the ball game by his own coach?
    2 points
  38. It's better to get in the habit of verbalizing all of them.
    2 points
  39. I'll go out on a limb and say that for the foreseeable future, I would umpire a game for one bitcoin.
    2 points
  40. 2 points
  41. In the stretch, the hands must be apart. When set, the hands must be together. When F1 checked 1B, he didn't move his hands. So it wasn't a move to come set.
    2 points
  42. I would have handled this as you did, MT73. I'm not going to impose the IFF call after the fact because both teams apparently relied on the pre-game understanding, however misguided that was. Besides, this was an U9 game, for pete's sake, not the WS. For whatever reason, the umpires in your case were relying on the coaches for the local rules. Consequently, they thought they were calling the game by the tournament rules, although they were misinformed. I'm curious: was the pop-up caught or dropped? Did the IFF no-call affect anything?
    2 points
  43. Here's a very long clip of the play w/ both home & away feeds. The AZ announcers seem to have no idea what's happening...the Houston crew does a much better job of recognizing what's happening.
    2 points
  44. I would try different HSM styles and/or sizes before giving up on them. Or see if you have eye protection options that work better. Catchers wear sunglasses under HSM's all the time, so it seems like you should be able to find a workable solution. Good luck!
    2 points
  45. I think this is why OBR/NCAA call time when the previously obstructed runner is tagged out at a base he was protected to even though there are other runners that could be played played on, acknowledging @Senor Azul's differing opinion that you wait for all playing action to end. CCS shows a recent OBS where time was called when the previously obstructed runner was tagged and we still had runner/s advancing on the bases. They also reference the WS OBS and that Lentz correction Demuth wishes that he had used the correct mechanic of calling time on the tag out instead of signaling safe: Kulpa-Lentz's Obstruction Shades of Joyce-DeMuth | Close Call Sports & Umpire Ejection Fantasy League But CCS is also remiss in quoting the rule wording of "no further action is possible" when there still was a runner.
    2 points
  46. Wolfe, This would only apply if the obstruction caused him to miss 2nd in the umpires judgment correct? He doesn't get a free pass if he is obstructed 10 ft off of 1st base and then just steps right over 2nd on his way to 3rd.
    2 points
  47. The thread has moved on a bit since last I checked in, but I want to respond to this. The point I hope your leadership was trying to make is that you should never be the aggressor (although, frankly, I'm not even sure that is 100% accurate). If a coach is yelling or talking loud enough to you hear, you're not the only one that can hear it. By not responding in kind, you're not being, well, unkind, you're standing up for yourself. You said earlier that what we allow we promote. At best, by not immediately responding to an accusation yelled at you from across the field, it creates an impression that it's okay to yell at umpires in the minds if the fans and players/coaches that are not informed of your later communication. That's the best case scenario. Switching gears, being liked (especially in the form of respect) does not preclude having disagreements or confrontations. There is a particular team that I had quite a few times this spring. Very, very good program. Before and after the game, I had nothing but positive interactions with the coaching staff. In fact, after the spring season ended, I had the 3rd base coach in a travel ball game, and he immediately recognized me and greeted me warmly. We chatted for much of the game as he was coaching first (which, yes, is generally not great idea, and I do not recommend this be emulated). As far as I could tell, that coaching staff liked me quite a bit, they told me on multiple occasions that I had done a good job, and I liked them as well. But, in nearly every game with that team, I would have some sort of confrontation with them. And to echo what many others have said, it's much better to be respected than liked.
    2 points
  48. My professional opinion is 7, 8, and 9 years old is too young for structured, age-segregated, regimented, “hey, we need an umpire for this” baseball. It should start at 10 years old, be 50-70 in distances, and be rather simple and straightforward in its rule set. Perhaps a 4th foundational rule set could be drafted (YBR?). If a “gifted” 9 or 8 year old wants to participate, then he (or she) and the family can do so with the full knowledge of what they’re getting into. Thing is, when kids are (or were) left to their own devices, and start up a baseball / stickball / wiffleball game… they don’t care what ages and skill sets the teammates or opponents are. And, they make up rule judgements as they go. They pretty much don’t need adults.
    2 points
  49. A number of us are notorious for suggesting that amateur umpires do not call enough strikes. The virtues of calling more strikes are numerous; primary among them are better baseball and shorter games.
    2 points
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