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  1. I think there is a couple of ways to handle this situation, and this can help you in others, as well. 1. You could have just ejected right after the F-bomb. Kid was mouthy, maybe it was time he learns in a Fall Ball game rather than a regular season. I'd have no problem with you dumping the kid. 2. Rather than saying, "please watch your language," a stern "That's enough" in conjunction with your hand up giving the stop sign, is a better warning. Now if the kid doesn't get the warning and mouths off again, he's done. He got his warning, after that, it's on him. Saying, "please watch your language," and wanting a response back, sets you up for needless banter with the player. What if he doesn't answer you? Now you have to decide if you want to escalate the interaction. You told him twice to watch the language, and you got a snarky remark back. Keep your conversation to a minimum. Give him a stern warning. If the player decides to continue with being a jerk, then he gets dumped and learns a lesson. Saying "please watch your language" is asking him to comply. "That's enough" is telling him to knock it off. You're the one that is in charge of the situation. Don't let the kid be in charge. Hope that is helpful.
    7 points
  2. I had the honor of working the 1st ever college game played at the Field of Dreams movie site. Here are some of my favorites for this once in a lifetime opportunity.
    6 points
  3. "I would equate the fielder jumping up, catching the ball, and landing on the base with inadvertently stepping on the base. Without anything further, like an actual tag of the runner, I would have a "safe" call: the act of inadvertently landing on the base does not constitute an appeal, even if we deem the base touched inadvertently by the fielder with complete control." I respectfully disagree. By returning to 3B after the catch, the runner is clearly indicating he left too soon. By throwing to 3B, F4 is also clearly indicating an appeal. In this situation, I do not equate jumping up in the air to catch a high throw then coming down on the base as an inadvertent action. F5, by touching the base with control of the ball ahead of the runner, as was mentioned in the OP, is an out. The play is over and the runner is out. The attempt to also tag the runner is a secondary and unnecessary play.
    5 points
  4. https://www.dailywire.com/news/mom-ordered-to-pay-more-than-9k-after-daughter-sucker-punched-another-girl-during-game?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=dwbrand “A grown adult directing a child to use violence against another child on the basketball court is reprehensible,” Orange County District Attorney Todd Spitzer shared in a statement to ABC 7 News. This is why when we hear stupid coaches or parents say things like, “run ‘em over next time,” “take him out then if they won’t call it,” or “I guess you just gotta plow right through”……the minimum should be a warning for the coach and also a team warning that if anyone takes his/her coach up on the offer, they’ll be ejected (along with said instructing coach). Frankly, I’d be fine with immediately EJ said coach, and then dumping any player who still wanted to follow through.
    5 points
  5. Almost curious how many if the posts covering the 9 years of this thread (almost 630 total posts), involve @wolfe_man?
    4 points
  6. I had the honor of working the plate on this game. Everything said on the video is correct. In our pregame as a crew and at the plate meeting, anything that would hit the corn in the air would be judged a HR regardless of height.
    4 points
  7. Hopefully MLB will also address the time wasting nonsense of the dugouts and bull pens emptying when some one takes offense at the other team's perceived slight(s). That stupidity does nothing other than waste time. Very rarely are there any real fights, and even then the rest of the team almost never does anything of any significance. When the NHL (that says NHL for effs sake) decided it no Rant wanted bench clearing brawls it changed the rules so it stopped. That was 35(!) years ago. Enough with the fake macho "I got your back bruh" horsesh*t.
    4 points
  8. Over 30 years ago, I was cutting my teeth as a LL umpire. I was doing softball in a Summer league. And I had the following exchange. (HT coach looked like Popeye with Black Birth-Control Glasses.) The other team had a strong infield with a first baseman that was tall, athletic, and very agile. A lot of throws required her to stretch sideways, but her length made it a well-earned out. Then I heard from the HT dugout: "I want an Interference call there!" (He meant Obstruction, but there was none IMJ.) Also, he was a coacher, not the manager, so he had no standing. Nonetheless, one other time in that inning, and twice in the next inning I got the same rant: "I want an Interference call!" Next play, the throw from F5 just went over the outstretched glove of the "condor" first baseman. BR made second on the error. And it happened again: "I want an interference call on that play!" So I pointed to the BR at second base: "Hey Number 21! Your coach wants an interference call. You are out for interference!" I turned to Popeye and asked, "Happy now?" Mike Las Vegas
    4 points
  9. I’ve umpired with the clock now for 130 games. It is the best rule change I’ve been apart of. The game actually has pace now instead of what it was. Y’all will learn to love it, as most people have in affiliated baseball
    4 points
  10. I call it the ESPN Effect. No one's interested in the small play anymore because it doesn't make highlight reels. Big hits in hockey and football, dunks in basketball, big flies in baseball: they're all highlight-reel inducing plays that garner more attention now than the smaller, smarter plays that require the viewer to see more nuance. That's one of the reasons I like baseball over the others.
    4 points
  11. Thanks. I have done it this way for 500+ plate games and haven't had any complaints from "the boys in charge" AKA lower management. They used to have some decision making authority but, as they have gotten older they have assumed more of a figure head role.
    4 points
  12. 1. You are there to get a job (assuming you are trying to get a job...I believe you implied that in your post). The "fun" should come in the form of studying something you love ("umpiring") in incredible detail. Yes, there were nights when we got together in a room and had a drink or watched a game (i.e., football playoffs). But, honestly, I never saw anyone ever overdo it with drinks or partying. The couple of students who did regularly go out (to strip clubs, bars, etc.) didn't come close to getting a job (big shock there, LOL). Most of your "free" time is spent studying or practicing your mechanics and rules. A number of us went to the fields a lot of evenings (after the instructors were gone) to practice what we had learned. For me, when I needed a mental break I went for a swim in the hotel pool or we had a putting contest on the hotel's putting green. Bottom line: you're there to work; it takes up a lot of your time. I'm not a military veteran, but a few students said it was like boot camp in that you have to live the school 24/7...with just minor breaks away from the studying and practicing. 2. If you have a legitimate question, you should ask it. If you get an answer from an instructor and you don't like the answer, you should never ask another instructor because you didn't like the first instructor's answer. Joe Brinkman called this "picking off instructors"...which is one of the fastest ways to not get a job. Also, if you're a person who asks a million questions (such as hypothetical situation after hypothetical situation)...you are not getting a job. If you're the person that causes all the other students to roll their eyes when you start to ask yet another question...you're not getting a job. If you are really struggling to grasp a concept...definitely ask an instructor one-on-one between sessions or as you're walking from the classroom to the field, etc. Finally, as for participating in demonstrations...you aren't going to have a choice. They're not voluntary if you're trying to get a job. Trust me, they'll pick you. The only thing that is voluntary is that they may ask some students to play the role of fielders or runners. And trust me, you are NOT earning bonus points if you volunteer. They don't give two sh!ts. They are always watching the guys who are umpiring in a drill...not the students who are running or fielding. 3. Be in shape. Run, swim, exercise...whatever it is you need to do to be in shape. These days they want kids who look like athletes. Mind you, you do not have to look like a world class athlete (so don't be scared), but they don't want a 20-22 year-old with a beer gut, either. The minor leagues are physically demanding. You're umpiring day-after-day for half the year; plus you have do a ton of traveling to work those games. As for the umpiring part it is like boot camp in this regards: they are going to break you down at the beginning to build you back up. Will have an advantage if you know the two-man mechanics and rules inside and out? Of course you will. However, you can learn them while your there. (There have been numerous persons throughout the decades who got a pro job having never umpired before.) So, you don't have to already be an expert in 2-man mechanics or rules when you first arrive. However, what you cannot do in 4-5 weeks is get in shape if you are significantly out-of-shape...its just not possible. In summary here is what the instructors will look at: (1) Did you show significant improvement from Day 1 to the last day? (You don't have to rock the mechanics or be a rules expert in the first week. By the middle of the camp, you should be showing improvement. By the end, you should be slaying it.) (2) Are you in shape? (3) Are you a person that they would be okay with to live and travel with for 5-6 months if you were to become their partner in the future? They pride themselves on being gatekeepers. If you are the "one guy" in the class that no one can stand...they will not recommend you for a job no matter how well you do everything else. They won't torture some other minor league umpire by making them have to live and travel with an asshole for a whole season in low A ball. (4) Have guts. If the instructors start role playing as managers...don't be afraid to eject. They want to know that you have balls and won't "freeze" and look like a deer in headlights if you start hearing SH*# from the dugouts or a manager screaming in your face. Showing you have guts is a major intangible that they are definitely looking for. Pro ball is an entirely different animal from every other level of baseball. (Having worked them all. LOL)
    4 points
  13. You seem to be pretty content with this policy, but I would encourage you to reconsider it. Calling more strikes yields better baseball at ALL amateur levels. I recommend reserving a "tight" zone for pro ball. Baseball is a game of defense: it's the only game where the defense controls the ball. Everything about the game is better when the total number of runs in a game is less than 10. The pace of play is better, the quality of pitching is better (the starter goes longer and is more likely to get the feel of his secondary pitch when he throws it more), and coaches are happier. In my experience, we get more coaches griping in defense of their pitchers than their hitters: pitching is hard. I don't advocate anything crazy, but umpires have a lot more leeway than we think to call the "egg shaped zone," rather than the box described in the rule. Get those batters swinging, and your games will go faster and smoother, 99% of the time (there's no pleasing everyone). As for your EJ question: player misbehavior needs to be addressed. If you didn't see it and are not comfortable ejecting based on an inference, it still needs to be addressed. Speak to the coach and give a team warning.
    4 points
  14. Where is everyone's manners? Look at the pitcher and ask "what do you say?"
    3 points
  15. Thanks 1) i cant count how many times i have seen pitchers lean down to look at sign and maybe cant see again and try to lean closer, or just do it twice quickly for no reason at all If he’s leaning in, then leans in a little more that’s fine. What will trigger a balk is after getting a sign, starting to come set ( maybe even the start of the arms coming together) , and then an “ oh wait” moment where he stops, and looks back in for another sign.
    3 points
  16. My shin guards grunt and groan every time I move into a squat. Yeah ... it's definitely the shin guards. 😉
    3 points
  17. It’s super heavy and designed with catchers in mind, not umpires. One of my buddies got one and returned it pretty quickly
    3 points
  18. I swear I worked with this guy a few months back. Unfortunately in my case, he didn't leave... he stayed all game.
    3 points
  19. @SCRookie, every league even the same league fall versus spring has its own culture, flavor, style, etc...and as human beings I suppose this applies somehow to umpires and umpiring, too. At the same time, one of the oldest clichés in sports is, "How we practice is how we play". And it's true for umpiring, too. If an umpire works fall ball say down at 10U (and that's fine, the game needs umpires at almost ALL levels...) and that umpire starts saying and doing things like, "Oh, it's 10U fall ball...I don't have to clean my shoes." or "It's fall ball, I don't have to be there until 10 minutes before game time." or "It's fall ball, so I'll take a step or two up the line after clearing the catcher but, I'm not going further because I can see swipe tags, pulled feet and running violations from there just fine..." or "Meh...the batter just fouled that ball off the fence but, I'm not going to inspect the baseball because it's fall ball..." Well, guess what is likely going to happen next? After 2 or 3 months of umpiring fall baseball in this relaxed, casual state...you're going to put your gear away for the winter and not think about baseball and or umpiring until February when you start getting notifications for HS scrimmages and then you show up to work those scrimmages with the same half-hearted efforts you were using to work fall ball and your craft suffers and you have to un-do all those bad habits you picked up. This notion that human beings can "flip the switch" when "the games matter" is largely a myth. How we practice is how we play. Work fall baseball, absolutely. Work spring baseball, absolutely. Keep a written list of things you are working on. You know what those things are; you've heard them repeatedly from your mentors and umpire brothers that you know and trust. Part of your pre-game for ALL baseball games should be to tell your crew what YOU are working on and have them tell you what THEY are working on. Don't overload yourself. You have a ballgame to work. And then in post-game, review those "working items". How did everyone do? Take notes and consider the feedback you were given. Could any of it be positively implemented on your craft to make you a better umpire? An umpire who doesn't take the field to work on things is not working to become a better umpire. ~Dawg
    3 points
  20. I've adopted the mst3k mindset (and not just on the field). If anyone get 8% of the jokes, that's a lot.
    3 points
  21. I umpire varsity baseball and travel ball like a lot of other umpires here. Where I umpire there is a facility that hosts a lot of Travel Ball tournaments. The last five to ten years has seen an explosion in the number of travel ball teams out there. Mostly the coaches in varsity baseball and travel ball are good, but every once in a while I see or hear something from one of them that makes me go "What did you say?" Here are my top four 2022 examples. Perhaps other umps will add their favorites in this thread. Number 1 - 18U travel ball game. I am behind the plate and my partner is in the B position. R1 is on first and the Batter Runner has a two ball count. The pitcher throws a pitch and the BR pops it up in foul ground between the plate and first. The first baseman drifts into foul territory and reaches up for the ball. The ball clanks out of his glove, drops directly down to the ground in foul territory and then rolls into fair territory. The first basemen yells, "Crud, I dropped it", so there is no mystery about him clanking the play. I call it "Foul" and do the foul ball mechanic. As the players are returning to position, the Coach of the Offensive team (in the first base dugout so this all happened right in front of him) calls time out and hustles up to me and proclaims, "That's a fair ball!". I explain that it's foul because it touched the Firstbaseman's mitt in foul territory. He continues his argument with an example of a bunt that rolls foul and then goes fair at the last minute. I agree with that but tell him that's not the case if the ball hits something while it is foul. He turns from me to my partner and yells, "Tell your partner that ball is fair." My partner shakes his head and says, "No coach, that is foul". He continues to get upset, so I finally mollify him and get him back in the dugout (without having to eject him) by telling him that there is a rule that states that as soon as an umpire yells "foul" the ball is foul no matter where it is. As he heads back for the dugout he looks over his shoulder and says, "Just so long as you know you got it wrong." Number 2 - 16U travel ball game. I am in the B position and there is a runner on first with no outs. The pitcher toes the rubber and R1 takes a lead. The pitcher comes set and then tucks his chin down against his front shoulder to peek at the runner. Then he lifts his head up to look at his target. Then he lowers his chin to peek at the runner. Then he looks up to the target and pitches. My partner calls a strike. The first base coach calls time out and tells me "He balked". I asked for his argument. The coach tells me "He's deceiving the runner by nodding his head up and down like that.". I tell the coach, "A pitcher can't balk with his head." The coach says, "The rule gives you the discretion to call that a balk and he's balking by deceiving the runner by nodding his head like that". I ask the coach, "Then how is the pitcher supposed to check the runner on first?" The coach says, "As soon as he comes set he can't look back." I think for a minute and then just to move the game along and not argue anymore, I say to him with a smile, "Coach, you said it's in my judgment right? Well then in my judgment that's not a balk." 21 ways to balk in the game. I'm not familiar with any that involve nodding. Number 3 - Varsity baseball. R1 on first and R2 on second with one out and the pitcher is in the stretch. I'm in the C position. The pitcher comes set and then clearly steps back off the rubber and attempts to pick to first. He throws it over the first baseman's head and directly into dead ball territory. I call "Time" and say, "The pitcher stepped back before he through, so that's two bases to the runners" and I score R2 and place R1 on third. The coach, from the dugout screams at me, "Your timing sucks! You need to let the play develop before you make a call!" I said, "Coach since you' chose to yell across the diamond I'm going to ask you this question so everyone can hear it. That ball was out of play as soon as it crossed the white "out of play" line. By that I mean "out of play" as in the play is over and nothing else can happen. Perhaps you can explain to the rest of the class exactly what other occurrence should I wait for before I make the call "Out of Play?" The coach pauses, opens his mouth and then sits down on the bench quiet. Game resumes with no more argument and no need for an ejection. Number 4 - 18U travel ball game. R1 is on first and the pitcher is left handed. I'm in the B position. The pitcher comes set and then lifts his front leg. R1 is going on the first move and attempts to steal second. The pitcher alertly picks to first and the first baseman throws to the shortstop at second base. A run down ensues. The shortstop runs R1 back towards first and then throws to the Firstbaseman. The SS halts in the exact spot in the baseline from where he threw the ball. The firstbaseman starts to chase R1 toward second and R1 collides with the SS while the Firstbaseman is still holding the ball. I call time, point with my left hand and call "Obstruction" and place R1 on second base. The defensive coach charges onto the field without calling time out and yells, "That's not obstruction, Blue. You don't know the rule! You don't even know that it's not 'obstruction'! It's interference! Get it straight before you make a call!" I turn to the coach and say, "First off, I'm going to do you a favor. 'Time out'! Now we can talk. Coach that's textbook obstruction. The short stop is in the baseline without the ball and he's not in the immediate act of catching the ball. The baserunner collided with him and that's 'Obstruction'. You obstruct runners and you interfer with the defense." He looks confused and then shouts, "Well you have to give the shortstop time to make a baseball move." I took my sunglasses off and said, "Coach, I'm familiar with five rule sets; Little League, NHSF, Babe Ruth, American Legion and the Official Rules of Baseball. If you can pull out your phone, google that term and find a place in any one of them the phrase 'baseball move', I'll put R1 wherever you want him." He opens his mouth to argue, when his own Shortstop taps him on his shoulder and says, "Coach, the Blue is right." Now I'm not claiming to be perfect, but maybe at that level some of these coaches should had some of this stuff straight by now.
    3 points
  22. There is no TIME unless there is "TIME!" If you haven't called time, don't pretend that an "implied time out" exists. Since you all won't let us proclaim "Dead ball!" then the only thing that can kill it is saying "TIME!" You want us to say "TIME!" in the evident situation when the ball enters dead ball territory. You want us to say "TIME!" in the evident situation when a batter gets hit by a pitch. So why in the hell would there EVER be anything that would be an "implied time" when the ball is live? Both OBR and NFHS say the ball is live until the umpire calls "TIME!" I'm sure I've told the story on here about a veteran umpire asking me why I call "TIME!" every time I brush off the plate. At the moment, my answer was "I was taught that. Habit, I guess." Later that day, when we had swapped out for another game, he was behind the plate and getting ready to brush it off when a runner came sliding across it. My answer changed to, "That's why." Of course, the defense was aggrieved and we had to get together. I had to stop laughing in order to ask him, "Did you call time?" He had not. I said, "I didn't call time. You didn't call time. The ball didn't leave the field. The batter wasn't hit by a pitch. So why would the ball be dead?" We let the run stand. He now calls time before he brushes the plate off.
    3 points
  23. Friend passed this along today: At one point during a game, the coach called one of his 9-year-old baseball players aside and asked, “Do you understand what co-operation is? What a team is?” “Yes, coach,” replied the little boy. “Do you understand that what matters is whether we win or lose together, as a team?” The little boy nodded in the affirmative. “So,” the coach continued, “I’m sure you know, when an out is called, you shouldn't argue, or curse, or attack the umpire, or call him an asshole. Do you understand all that?” Again, the little boy nodded in the affirmative. The coach continued, “And when I take you out of the game so that another boy gets a chance to play, we don’t call that 'a dumbass decision' or that it means that the coach is 'a SH*#head', right??” “Yes, coach.” “Good”, said the coach. “Now go over there and explain all that to your grandmother.”
    3 points
  24. Leave it to a Canadian to try to find the most polite way of getting out of this.
    2 points
  25. Area of the country could matter: hell, in NJ, their state motto has the F word in it! It's hard to get much traction on this issue when every other YouTube video they watch is chock full of obscenities. For HS kids, it's a routine part of their vocabulary. I tend to distinguish ordinary "kids talking" obscenity from that directed at me/us or an opponent. The latter needs to be addressed, and there's no hard & fast rule about whether EJ is the right way—sometimes it's right for the first offense, sometimes just a KTSO. But I recommend addressing it every time in one way or another.
    2 points
  26. Here's something else to think about. The rule states, in part, "...which can be caught by an infielder with ordinary effort." Nowhere does the rule say where the ball has to be caught.
    2 points
  27. You have a challenge. You used it earlier. If you use up all your players, you don't get to call in more players. You used up your resources unwisely. Sorry coach. Why should anything be different? If we are just going to review everything, why bother having umpires at all. Let NY call it all remotely. While I don't like the idea of limiting what plays or types of plays can be reviewed, I have serious objection to constantly changing rules and expanding things incrementally because somebody didn't like a call the year before. Go the football route ... give coaches a FINITE number of challenges (whatever number you want) and that's it. None of this "Well, we can't review it this inning, but if the exact same thing happened the next inning we could." Asinine.
    2 points
  28. Yeah at this point LL is still mirroring the old text where it could not rebound off a CP or mask or whatever else of the catchers unless it hit his free hand or glove 1st. I'm LMAO at this one.. I mean 99% of all LL games are probably done with 1 umpire. Getting a foul tip that deflects off the glove or hand rebounding off a CP or mask and is caught and then calling that correct a lot of the time is going to be difficult most of the time I would say. I am perfectly fine with them leaving it mitt or glove only 1st but I do wish it would just go to an any type of rebound like the other rule sets. sigh.
    2 points
  29. Yeah, it’s perfect for any umpires working in… say… Virginia, Indiana, or Ohio. Ooh! I nearly forgot! Michigan. 😈 Don’t glare at me like that, Jeff. Heh, you found ‘em faster and easier than I could. It’s okay… @Stk004 speaks that lingo… he’s far from an “older Ump” 👨🏼‍🦳
    2 points
  30. And that’s no fault of the pads and their creator – WindPact. That is entirely the fault of those penny-pinching morons at EvoShield, and their parent company Wilson… … which itself has a parent, international company over it, Amer Sports of Finland, which was bought out by… ready for this?… Chinese super-corporation Anta Sports. 🤨 Yeah, nobody cares.
    2 points
  31. The mask itself is nothing special. Oh sure, it looks radically different than traditional, "iconic" planforms, and its layout has a great balance of sight-lines and protection. It has a burdensome flaw, however – it's (completely unnecessarily) heavy. Why? Because it's made in solid steel wire. Why? 🤷‍♂️ * mutter mutter * I know why. 🤬 * mutter mutter * Anyway, it's the pads we want. What you're looking at is the latest, greatest, state-of-the-art technology for impact mitigation... dare I say, (perhaps) even better than the vaunted, loved Team Wendy's Zorbium foam. WindPact's CrashCloud air bladders work tremendously well. WindPact's involvement is borne out of Football and Military applications, but there needs to be more encouragement to them to step even more boldly into baseball, primarily by offering up CrashCloud pads independent of a specific mask frame pairing. See the other model carrying the CrashClouds, from UnderArmour, and you're left going... "What the... why?!". So, get me the pads, separate from a/the mask frame, and I'd be yer buddy for life.
    2 points
  32. Back when I was 29, I lost a girlfriend to ovarian cancer. It was devastating on multiple levels (primarily to her, her family, and long-time friends pool... I was a recent addition). I don't wish that upon anyone. A simple field of color is in no way distasteful or objectionable. In the grand scheme of things, what does it really matter if we show support for a humane endeavor such as combating cancer? A quick cursory search on Amazon hauls up many options... all I'd need is some of this vinyl material and an XActo knife: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=pink+vinyl+adhesive&crid=683UKANKFEPS&sprefix=pink+vinyl+adhesive%2Caps%2C182&ref=nb_sb_noss_1 As far as conducting my own tribute / memorial / awareness, I not only have a Pink umpire shirt, but I also have two of these: Well, correct that. I have the vertical-stripe version, not this new panel version, but it's a really keen look during October and on Mothers' Day. No, I don't have pink mask pads. Not because I wouldn't use them in conjunction with a black mask and this here black-n-pink shirt, but because the only maker of pink mask pads is Wilson... ... and we already know my feelings on that. 🤨
    2 points
  33. If we had a runner on this might be the 1% time the signal would be needed.
    2 points
  34. Every other sport has specific rules to where players are allowed to be at specific times - from offside rules, covering the end in football, time in the key, etc, etc. I see nothing wrong with a rule enforcing infield and outfield positioning...the current defensive strategy has led to a significant decrease to the number of times a ball is put in play - making the game less enjoyable for EVERYBODY. Hitting is hard enough as it is.
    2 points
  35. OF COURSE the announcer "just [doesn't] see that interference call." Can this become a new "ka-ching" type sound effect like the most horrendous phrase in the English language ("gets his money's worth"?
    2 points
  36. starting age and how many started at that age for the current full time staff of 76 MLB umpires. (18--2).......(19--6)......(20--6)......(21--5)......(22--11)......(23--16)......(24--14)......(25--9)......(26--2)......(27--2)......(28--1)......(29--1)......(30--1) call up staff has 2 umpires that started at 33.
    2 points
  37. He's gotten a lot more uptight since Dukes of Hazzard /s
    2 points
  38. Situation 1: If I had any confidence in the judgment of intent, I might rule MC. This does not kill the ball, but would be enforced after play (R3 probably scores, unless the ball bounces straight up or down). But in the real world, I would not rule MC, as the run scoring is penalty enough for F2's dumb play. Situation 2: This is a sportsmanship issue. If it's a FED game, I'd issue a 3-3-1f warning to the coach (and then F2 better be careful).
    2 points
  39. It's just cool to have been a part of this. Say what you want about LL, but there is really nothing out there quite like this in any other youth baseball organization. I do a lot of HS ball, too, but this is pretty special. Sometimes I'd rather do LL games for free, than some HS games. HS varsity games are much better competition, but man, they can be such A$$holes sometimes. Didn't have a lick of trouble in any game. Even the ones leading up to this tournament.
    2 points
  40. I work out of my trunk, so pants then shins.
    2 points
  41. Typical, 2 man system coaches argument ........great video Lindsay, a lot of high school guys will like this one!
    2 points
  42. If you didn't see him throw a bat then I wouldn't do or say anything.
    2 points
  43. Well, not to be argumentative, but I hope that I didn't say that, as it isn't correct and does not withstand scrutiny. The return of runners with non-FPSR INT is always TOI in FED, regardless of whether it's a force play. No, the reason it's TOP for FPSR is that this is the more severe penalty. The strong emphasis on safety in this rule warrants the harsher penalty: the offense will simply never be permitted to benefit from FPSR violations in any manner, and no advance of runners is possible on such plays.
    2 points
  44. For our NFHS umpires ... Ohtani was dangerously close to the legendary "two strikes, one pitch". Two significant differences in NFHS: NFHS does not allow the option of calling a ball on the legally delivered pitch when the batter steps out or asks for time. It is a strike regardless. NFHS also requires an additional strike penalty if the batter steps out with both feet. 6-2-4d(1) 1. If the pitcher, with a runner on base, stops or hesitates in his delivery because the batter steps out of the box (a) with one foot or (b) with both feet or (c) holds up his hand to request “Time,” it shall not be a balk. In (a) and (c), there is no penalty on either the batter or the pitcher. The umpire shall call “Time” and begin play anew. In (b), a strike shall be called on the batter for violation of 7-3-1. In (a), (b) and (c), if the pitcher legally delivers the ball, it shall be called a strike and the ball remains live. Thus, two strikes are called on the batter in (b). If the umpire judges the batter’s action to be a deliberate attempt to create a balk, he will penalize according to 3-3-1n. 3-3-1n is the extreme case ... ejection for attempting to cause a balk.
    2 points
  45. In the professional game, because the power is that much higher and speeds are that much faster, the slightest variation to an otherwise “routine, normal, standard” action can lead to a wildly different result. There is no “he would have been Out (or Safe, such as OBS) anyway” – if you (as Umpire) see anything that could affect a/the play, you call it. It’s why the Pros jump all over the slightest twitch of an F1, called as a Balk. There is no “delayed” call, to see what happens. That slight twitch could be the difference between R1 getting picked off or returning / advancing safely. So too here, if the Pro U1 doesn’t call INT at that exact moment, and the resulting shovel pass to F1 doesn’t successfully retire BR, how do we (baseball participants) know that that “could be” INT didn’t affect F3’s ability to make that play? Can’t go back (in the moment) and declare, “You know what? That was INT after all!”. The “threshold for potential” is different in the amateur game.
    2 points
  46. Our NH guy got the plate for the LL US championship Try not to suck Phil!!! Hope they all have a great game!
    2 points
  47. I don’t think there’s a one size fits all answer here. For the most part, I’m fine with calling time when F2 leaves for the mound. But…….. Lets say I have an “ active” r3. He’s running a few steps down the line every pitch because F 1 is winding up. Daring a throw from F2. He’s on his toes watching F2’s throw back to the mound looking for any miss step that may give him a chance to score. F2 catches the next pitch and before I can even say “ ball” or “ strike” he’s popped up and heading to the mound to talk to F1 without even turning around and holding up a hand. I know R3’s been waiting for something like this and I’m watching him before I think about calling time when no one asked for it. If r3 is heading back to third? Which is 99% if the time, call time.
    2 points
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