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  1. I had the honor of working the 1st ever college game played at the Field of Dreams movie site. Here are some of my favorites for this once in a lifetime opportunity.
    6 points
  2. I had the honor of working the plate on this game. Everything said on the video is correct. In our pregame as a crew and at the plate meeting, anything that would hit the corn in the air would be judged a HR regardless of height.
    4 points
  3. I think there is a couple of ways to handle this situation, and this can help you in others, as well. 1. You could have just ejected right after the F-bomb. Kid was mouthy, maybe it was time he learns in a Fall Ball game rather than a regular season. I'd have no problem with you dumping the kid. 2. Rather than saying, "please watch your language," a stern "That's enough" in conjunction with your hand up giving the stop sign, is a better warning. Now if the kid doesn't get the warning and mouths off again, he's done. He got his warning, after that, it's on him. Saying, "please watch your language," and wanting a response back, sets you up for needless banter with the player. What if he doesn't answer you? Now you have to decide if you want to escalate the interaction. You told him twice to watch the language, and you got a snarky remark back. Keep your conversation to a minimum. Give him a stern warning. If the player decides to continue with being a jerk, then he gets dumped and learns a lesson. Saying "please watch your language" is asking him to comply. "That's enough" is telling him to knock it off. You're the one that is in charge of the situation. Don't let the kid be in charge. Hope that is helpful.
    4 points
  4. "I would equate the fielder jumping up, catching the ball, and landing on the base with inadvertently stepping on the base. Without anything further, like an actual tag of the runner, I would have a "safe" call: the act of inadvertently landing on the base does not constitute an appeal, even if we deem the base touched inadvertently by the fielder with complete control." I respectfully disagree. By returning to 3B after the catch, the runner is clearly indicating he left too soon. By throwing to 3B, F4 is also clearly indicating an appeal. In this situation, I do not equate jumping up in the air to catch a high throw then coming down on the base as an inadvertent action. F5, by touching the base with control of the ball ahead of the runner, as was mentioned in the OP, is an out. The play is over and the runner is out. The attempt to also tag the runner is a secondary and unnecessary play.
    4 points
  5. Almost curious how many if the posts covering the 9 years of this thread (almost 630 total posts), involve @wolfe_man?
    3 points
  6. Never used one before in my life. I worked 3 innings with it on this night before going back to my Cobalt. Had a lot of trouble signaling count and partners.
    2 points
  7. Did you use early 20th Century equipment like the Wilson too? Ok, that one was for MadMax.... Its almost beer time....
    2 points
  8. I shall not today attempt further to define what a close play is with a shorthand description, and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know one when I see one. My apologies to the former justice.
    2 points
  9. Thanks 1) i cant count how many times i have seen pitchers lean down to look at sign and maybe cant see again and try to lean closer, or just do it twice quickly for no reason at all If he’s leaning in, then leans in a little more that’s fine. What will trigger a balk is after getting a sign, starting to come set ( maybe even the start of the arms coming together) , and then an “ oh wait” moment where he stops, and looks back in for another sign.
    2 points
  10. Here's something else to think about. The rule states, in part, "...which can be caught by an infielder with ordinary effort." Nowhere does the rule say where the ball has to be caught.
    2 points
  11. The technical right call should be 'you stay here'. Reality? The foot is behind the plate, in front of the catcher who is most likely blocking me out, so unless I am 10000000% that the foot is outside the box, that batter is going to 1st. Any chance a 1/16" of the shoe is touching chalk? Doubtful that anyone has a better view of this either, other than the pitcher and maybe my partner(s) if they are inside by the mound. This is one of those tough ones to catch and enforce appropriately.
    2 points
  12. You have a challenge. You used it earlier. If you use up all your players, you don't get to call in more players. You used up your resources unwisely. Sorry coach. Why should anything be different? If we are just going to review everything, why bother having umpires at all. Let NY call it all remotely. While I don't like the idea of limiting what plays or types of plays can be reviewed, I have serious objection to constantly changing rules and expanding things incrementally because somebody didn't like a call the year before. Go the football route ... give coaches a FINITE number of challenges (whatever number you want) and that's it. None of this "Well, we can't review it this inning, but if the exact same thing happened the next inning we could." Asinine.
    2 points
  13. Why would suddenly veering into foul territory make this any less interference than suddenly veering into fair territory which is exactly what he did? R3 knew exactly what he was doing and was hoping for an outcome exactly what happened. Back in my playing days I have done this same thing. Believe me, I know umpires have plenty to look for but I would think with the game on the line he (HP Umpire) should kind of have his radar up as soon as that ball was hit. Seriously, just my two cents.
    2 points
  14. Yeah, it’s perfect for any umpires working in… say… Virginia, Indiana, or Ohio. Ooh! I nearly forgot! Michigan. 😈 Don’t glare at me like that, Jeff. Heh, you found ‘em faster and easier than I could. It’s okay… @Stk004 speaks that lingo… he’s far from an “older Ump” 👨🏼‍🦳
    2 points
  15. Why would a tie have any kind of sleeves?
    2 points
  16. So f--- ball is the place to work on your f---ing language? I disagree. If that is the view of f--- ball in your area, then it is the place to get better at what you are doing, not a (root) beer league for the kids to get away with things they won't get away with in other games.
    1 point
  17. Ah, in tourneys, ejections can have a couple of levels of 'severity'. The first is for minor things, which is 'rest of game'. The second is '+1', which means "this game, plus the next". Our tourney also has "Rest of day", "Rest of tourney", and sometimes, "Forever". The 1st 2 (rest of game vs +1) is up to the ump to decide on their own. Ump + Site Director can do a "Rest of Day", and typically Tourney Director is required for the other two.
    1 point
  18. Why the double standard for behavior? I get some “looseness” on rules/procedures/etc. because maybe we’ve got 12 y.o. coming to Pony/Babe Ruth for the first time and pitching from the set is like walking on the moon to some kids. I’d never sacrifice behavior for “well, it’s just fall ball.”
    1 point
  19. The Field of Dreams college baseball game between Luther College and Briar Cliff featured a 1st inning home run into the corn field by Cam Reimer, although outfielder Cullen Stamp dove/tripped/fell into the corn trying to catch the fly ball. Rules regarding ballpark design help us in our quest to answer the question of what umpires would have called had Stamp successfully caught the baseball. Official Baseball Rule 2.01 is called Layout of the Field and specifies that "the distance from home base to the nearest fence, stand, or other obstruction on fair territory shall be 250 feet or more." Although the distance provision of this rule didn't always exist (it was put into the book primarily to account for some bizarre dimensions the Dodgers encountered when playing at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum their first few years in California), the general gist is expanded upon in Rule 5.06(b)(4) regarding base awards and baseballs leaving the playing field in flight. Although no solid fence-line exists at the Field of Dreams ballpark in Iowa, the manicured corn-line serves as an adequate boundary to mark in and out of play territory. Accordingly, had the fielder caught the ball while in the air, having last touched in-play territory, this would be a catch, and if the fielder then fell into the corn, it would be a catch-and-carry situation (dead ball, out stands, runners advance one base, if there are runners). However, if the fielder were to catch the ball only after stepping into the corn field, this would not be a valid catch. We also discuss the issue of a stadium lighting pole in live ball territory, akin (in a sense) to the flagpole formerly of Tal's Hill in Houston (MLB). Video as follows: Alternate Link: Can of Corn HR or Catch? Visiting the Rulebook (CCS)View the full article
    1 point
  20. Do you think he did? I really thought it looked like he was turning to avoid being hit in the face, not moving his head into the path. With the TV angle, I can't say I disagree, just that I saw it differently. 😉
    1 point
  21. God, I love it when a coach gives you a perfect chance at a great comeback. "Coach, come to think of it, I am also probably the only umpire in America willing to throw a coach out for just for laughs."
    1 point
  22. Assuming runners are on base, this is a balk. Coming set needs to be a single, uninterrupted motion. Not sure which foot you mean or what that has to do with the motion to come set. Once engaged, F1 may do just 3 things: pitch to the batter, step and throw/feint to a base, or disengaged. None of these actions are among those 3; with runners on, this is a balk. "Ever so slightly" anything should never be called in amateur baseball. Life is too short for that. F1 may not "turn his shoulders" to look at a runner, because doing so constitutes a feint. So if F1 does this to 1B, it's a balk for feinting a throw to 1B, not because the shoulder motion itself is illegal. That's why at MOST I would call time and tell F2 to go out and get his F1 not to turn his shoulders. If it's big and obvious, no choice but to call the balk. But "ever so slightly" is ignorable 100% of the time.
    1 point
  23. Well I guess it all depends on ability and experience. I mean I kno the lingo bc I’m a baseball head! But @Stk004 is too young. I been doing it for 21 years now and I’m still considered “far from an “older Ump”” lol he’s a baby! No Mal. Intent lol
    1 point
  24. ... and therein lies the problem. If they don't have a rule set they are playing by, then I'm going with your call of safe. It is wrong under every known published rule set ... but you said so and they couldn't point to a proper rule set to use. If they argue, award him home. 😉
    1 point
  25. Your runner should have been called out. You did not specify a rule set so here are 2021 OBR rules that support this call-- Rule 5.06(b)(3)(B) Comment: A runner forced to advance without liability to be put out may advance past the base to which he is entitled only at his peril. If such a runner, forced to advance, is put out for the third out before a preceding runner, also forced to advance, touches home plate, the run shall score. Play. Two out, bases full, batter walks but runner from second is overzealous and runs past third base toward home and is tagged out on a throw by the catcher. Even though two are out, the run would score on the theory that the run was forced home by the base on balls and that all the runners needed to do was proceed and touch the next base. Rule 5.05(b)(1) Comment: A batter who is entitled to first base because of a base on balls, including an award of first base to a batter by an umpire following a signal from a manager, must go to first base and touch the base before other base runners are forced to advance. This applies when bases are full and applies when a substitute runner is put into the game. If, in advancing, the base runner thinks there is a play and he slides past the base before or after touching it he may be put out by the fielder tagging him. If he fails to touch the base to which he is entitled and attempts to advance beyond that base he may be put out by tagging him or the base he missed.
    1 point
  26. The volleyball culture is much more amenable than the baseball culture. The whining and sniping about everything is not the expected behavior in VB. VB is a lot more than "Is it a lift?" Just like baseball it takes time a dedication to master all aspects of the sport And just like baseball, VB will humble you when you think you have reached the acme. In 18 years I have seen a lot and had a lot of opportunities to officiate some very good volleyball. I believe it is equal to baseball in it's intricacies when officiating and if made to pick one over the other, I would take VB because I will be able to work VB until I cannot climb a three step ladder. I have never been hit with a VB that has left a bruise, welt, or fracture and it is likely I never will. Because many people did not play organized volleyball in their youth they never consider it as a viable option as an official. In the time it takes me to officiate varsity and JV matches I make almost 1.5 times as much as I do in baseball. In all ways VB makes more sense than BB.
    1 point
  27. Actually it was a NFHS rule for the umpire to call it if he saw it happen. Did it once and that was enough. An umpire shouldn't have to make an appeal play for a team. I believe it was changed after one season.
    1 point
  28. So the crux of this situation as I understand it is focused on the tag and control of the ball, but I'd like to focus on the front half of the situation. The consensus seems to be that the throw to F5 was not a clear appeal. Respectfully, how is a throw from F4 in this situation not a clear appeal that R3 left early? In my mind, there's no other reason F4 would be throwing to F5 other than to appeal an early departure for R3.
    1 point
  29. I assume you mean to explore the gray of an action less obvious than this:
    1 point
  30. Caveat up front: the Cardinals are "my" National League team, but second only to the M's. I thought this video was really interesting (thanks again for posting these here, @Lindsay) and I get why RLI wasn't called. What I don't understand is how PU didn't see the runner as intentionally trying to disrupt the throw. We have the benefit of seeing R3 start running outside the foul line then moving to the inside of the line, but how many times do runners take that line during "normal" play? Hardly ever, I'd wager.
    1 point
  31. Not as much as baseball, but that's just me. I do enjoy it, though. It has a couple of advantages. There are never any rainouts/weather like baseball or football, and there's not the constant running of basketball. Unlike most other sports, you can call a "do over" if you screw it up. There's also less of a tolerance of sportsmanship BS - I've heard a curse word one time total in the last 7 years I've been doing this
    1 point
  32. From the 2021 Minor League Baseball Umpire Manual (section 5.30, pp. 65-66): In order to make a legal catch, the fielder must have one or both feet on or over the playing surface (including the lip of the dugout) and neither foot on the ground inside the dugout or other out-of-play surface… Protective Netting A fielder running into any screen or protective netting set on a field facing wall or railing (e.g., a backstop or protective netting along the first or third base lines) shall be considered as having entered the stands if, in the judgment of the umpire, neither foot is on or above the playing surface, even if he rebounds immediately back onto the field. Regardless of the location of the fielder’s feet, the umpire may judge the fielder to be in the stands, if the fielder becomes stuck in the safety netting, fails to immediately rebound or steps/falls into an out-of-play area. A fielder is permitted to lean against the netting and use his hands or head to hold himself up and prevent him from falling into the stands. Play 5: Runners on first and second base, one out. The right fielder makes a running catch on a foul fly ball on the warning track and his momentum causes him to fall into or becomes stuck in the field safety protective netting attached to the top of the field wall in foul territory. The fielder then rebounds onto the playing field. May the fielder throw for a play? Ruling 5: No. “Time” is called, and all runners advance one base.
    1 point
  33. I've been working volleyball for about 3 weeks now. The issue is that there's really not all the edge cases to discuss with volleyball like there is with baseball. The biggest thing you might have is a video of "would you call this a lift?" and at what levels (if you were to call a middle school match as tight as you do a college match, there would be a lift on about every volley). Incidentally, I heard the best quote from a coach in years yesterday. The other team's setter dumped the ball into an open area and nobody even moved toward it. Coach: "Girls! You can't be surprised when volleyball happens!"
    1 point
  34. Over 30 years ago, I was cutting my teeth as a LL umpire. I was doing softball in a Summer league. And I had the following exchange. (HT coach looked like Popeye with Black Birth-Control Glasses.) The other team had a strong infield with a first baseman that was tall, athletic, and very agile. A lot of throws required her to stretch sideways, but her length made it a well-earned out. Then I heard from the HT dugout: "I want an Interference call there!" (He meant Obstruction, but there was none IMJ.) Also, he was a coacher, not the manager, so he had no standing. Nonetheless, one other time in that inning, and twice in the next inning I got the same rant: "I want an Interference call!" Next play, the throw from F5 just went over the outstretched glove of the "condor" first baseman. BR made second on the error. And it happened again: "I want an interference call on that play!" So I pointed to the BR at second base: "Hey Number 21! Your coach wants an interference call. You are out for interference!" I turned to Popeye and asked, "Happy now?" Mike Las Vegas
    1 point
  35. @SCRookie, every league even the same league fall versus spring has its own culture, flavor, style, etc...and as human beings I suppose this applies somehow to umpires and umpiring, too. At the same time, one of the oldest clichés in sports is, "How we practice is how we play". And it's true for umpiring, too. If an umpire works fall ball say down at 10U (and that's fine, the game needs umpires at almost ALL levels...) and that umpire starts saying and doing things like, "Oh, it's 10U fall ball...I don't have to clean my shoes." or "It's fall ball, I don't have to be there until 10 minutes before game time." or "It's fall ball, so I'll take a step or two up the line after clearing the catcher but, I'm not going further because I can see swipe tags, pulled feet and running violations from there just fine..." or "Meh...the batter just fouled that ball off the fence but, I'm not going to inspect the baseball because it's fall ball..." Well, guess what is likely going to happen next? After 2 or 3 months of umpiring fall baseball in this relaxed, casual state...you're going to put your gear away for the winter and not think about baseball and or umpiring until February when you start getting notifications for HS scrimmages and then you show up to work those scrimmages with the same half-hearted efforts you were using to work fall ball and your craft suffers and you have to un-do all those bad habits you picked up. This notion that human beings can "flip the switch" when "the games matter" is largely a myth. How we practice is how we play. Work fall baseball, absolutely. Work spring baseball, absolutely. Keep a written list of things you are working on. You know what those things are; you've heard them repeatedly from your mentors and umpire brothers that you know and trust. Part of your pre-game for ALL baseball games should be to tell your crew what YOU are working on and have them tell you what THEY are working on. Don't overload yourself. You have a ballgame to work. And then in post-game, review those "working items". How did everyone do? Take notes and consider the feedback you were given. Could any of it be positively implemented on your craft to make you a better umpire? An umpire who doesn't take the field to work on things is not working to become a better umpire. ~Dawg
    1 point
  36. Didn't look like a voluntary release to me. Pretty clear no catch. I'm surprised at the initial call. I'll add another theoretical to that though: catch and carry? (Nobody was on base, but if they were and he caught it ...)
    1 point
  37. Depends on what you're asking. Did they get it right by rule? Yes...and in fact, that was confirmed as the game was play under protest, which was denied - the umpires' administration of the call was affirmed. There were runners on first and second, there were less than two outs, and the umpire judged that the fly ball could be caught be an infielder with ordinary effort. Did they get it right by judgment? Well...that's judgment. And by rule, the umpire's judgment is, with few exceptions, beyond reproach. It can't be disputed or argued, and is, by definition, always "right"...even if the umpire, upon further discussion and consideration, changes his mind, it's his decision to make, and, by definition, his final judgment is always "right". Beyond the checked swing appeal, the only exception to this is the leagues that allow instant replay review. IFF is one of the many judgment calls in MLB that cannot be reviewed under instant replay. So, even under today's rules, the umpire's judgment was right. But, I think anyone with two working eyes, a degree of common sense, an IQ above room temperature, and who isn't a die hard Braves fan, (but I repeat myself) can honesty see that this fly ball could have easily been caught by an infielder with ordinary effort.
    1 point
  38. 1 point
  39. Yup. A former-MLBU here in Phoenix has heavily advised it. I nicknamed it C-hatch cover. You put your left foot close to the centerline, about 6 feet back from that valve hatch cover. The Umpire’s point is that you are still in front of the fielders, such that you can see a line drive enter the glove, if that happens. A sharp grounder that is fielded by the F6, for example, is either going to: A) go to the plate (thus, you’re out of the way), B) go to 3B having frozen R3 (thus, you’re at a much better angle by staying in; also, especially helpful on backpicks from F2 to F5), or C) go to 1B, after looking back R3, wherein you have time to react accordingly.
    1 point
  40. This is Mask #3 in my arsenal, and up until a few days ago with the addition of the All-Star FM-Visor (AKA the Sunderhead, AKA the Jeff's Folly), was an overcast / night / cold -game only mask option for me. No longer the case! It's a FM4000 Hollow Steel: Yup, she's got a bit of a warble in the lower left horizontal eye slot bar where she took a wallop, but other than that, she's in great shape! And now I can use it even in the brightest of days. Lookat that visor! Why didn't I have one of these sooner??!! (Hmmm @Thunderheads? Oh right, cuz ya didn't want to make me one... )
    1 point
  41. This is Mask #2 in my arsenal, a Wilson DynAlum: This isn't any run-of-the-mill DynaLite Aluminum. It's a V1, so it still has the rounded ear guards (instead of the angled ear guards indicative of V2). @wolfe_man supplied me this one while I was on the summer circuit, and my other DynAlum broke (bent and sheared it). After the season, I sent it off to Tony at MaskIt, hoping to get recoated in Sky Blue Metallic. However, he misread the request, and did it in Bright Aluminum, which actually is even better than the original. With the powdercoating, it doesn't fade or show the impact marks at all. This is outfitted with black Team Wendy's, an UmpLife "Headhugger" V2 harness, and a Markwort rainbow-blue sun visor.
    1 point
  42. @BobUmp, so I take it... you really like that ZRO-G? 🤔 🧐 Here's the latest addition to my arsenal, via @Kelly McNary... the CanaryCage AlCsd: Notice that the ear struts are single & horizontal, in that "wrapped paperclip" manner, ala Wilson DynaLites... but this isn't a Wilson. Instead, there's a patent number printed on the frame (something Wilson does not do), that @Matt investigated and discovered is attributed to Diamond. Thus, the mask is an aluminum, by Diamond, with similar flat-bar construction as their lauded iX3s, but with a rounded chin guard instead of a squared chisel guard. This is outfitted with tan Team Wendy's, an UmpLife "Headhugger" V2 harness, and a Champro silver-smoke sun visor.
    1 point
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