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fishnfed

balk or not

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r1 and r2.  As F1 comes out of the set, the batter simply backs out of the box; no time requested or awarded.  The pitcher stops as his front foot plants.  HP does not call balk and states that the batter can not make the pitcher balk.  I've never seen this and was wondering what the knowledge base thinks.  Thanks,  FishnFed

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2 minutes ago, fishnfed said:

r1 and r2.  As F1 comes out of the set, the batter simply backs out of the box; no time requested or awarded.  The pitcher stops as his front foot plants.  HP does not call balk and states that the batter can not make the pitcher balk.  I've never seen this and was wondering what the knowledge base thinks.  Thanks,  FishnFed

That's correct. In this case call time and have the pitcher and batter start from "scratch."

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5.04(b)2 comments.

The following two paragraphs are additional material for Rule 5.04(b)(2) Comment (Rule 6.02(b) Comment), for Major League play only: If pitcher delays once the batter is in his box and the umpire feels that the delay is not justified he may allow the batter to step out of the box momentarily. If after the pitcher starts his windup or comes to a “set position” with a runner on, he does not go through with his pitch because the batter has inadvertently caused the pitcher to interrupt his delivery, it shall not be called a balk. Both the pitcher and batter have violated a rule and the umpire shall call time and both the batter and pitcher start over from “scratch.”

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This is the FED (high school) rule reference.

1. If the pitcher, with a runner on base, stops or hesitates in his delivery because the batter steps out of the box (a) with one foot or (b) with both feet or (c) holds up his hand to request "Time," it shall not be a balk. In (a) and (c), there is no penalty on either the batter or the pitcher. The umpire shall call "Time" and begin play anew. In (b), a strike shall be called on the batter for violation of 7-3-1.

This is the OBR reference

The following two paragraphs are additional material for Rule
5.04(b)(2) Comment (Rule 6.02(b) Comment), for Major
League play only:

If pitcher delays once the batter is in his box and the umpire
feels that the delay is not justified he may allow the batter to
step out of the box momentarily.
If after the pitcher starts his windup or comes to a “set position”
with a runner on, he does not go through with his pitch
because the batter has inadvertently caused the pitcher to
interrupt his delivery, it shall not be called a balk. Both the

pitcher and batter have violated a rule and the umpire shall
call time and both the batter and pitcher start over from
“scratch.”
The following paragraph is additional material for Rule
5.04(b)(2) Comment (Rule 6.02(b) Comment), for National
Association play (in lieu of the additional two paragraphs,
above, that apply to Major League play):
If after the pitcher starts his windup or comes to a “set position”
with a runner on, he does not go through with his pitch
because the batter has stepped out of the box, the umpire
shall not call a balk. The umpire shall call an automatic
strike if Rule 5.04(b)(4)(A) (Rule 6.02(d)(1)) calls for such
sanction.

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advantage vs. disadvantage

As cited above, you cannot allow the offense to do something that would unfairly penalize the defense.

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17 hours ago, fishnfed said:

r1 and r2.  As F1 comes out of the set, the batter simply backs out of the box; no time requested or awarded.  The pitcher stops as his front foot plants.  HP does not call balk and states that the batter can not make the pitcher balk.  I've never seen this and was wondering what the knowledge base thinks.  Thanks,  FishnFed

HP was correct. If the batter causes the balk why penalize F1.

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Building on Richvee's reference to the FED rule, if the batter steps out with both feet AND the pitcher delivers a pitch (any pitch), two strikes are called.  One for stepping out and one for the pitch.

To me the thought of this happening is kind of funny.  Could you imagine the reaction from everyone when you call TWO strikes on one pitch?  LOL.

I would probably just wimp out and call one strike.

Has anyone ever made this call in a game?

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1 hour ago, James88 said:

Building on Richvee's reference to the FED rule, if the batter steps out with both feet AND the pitcher delivers a pitch (any pitch), two strikes are called.  One for stepping out and one for the pitch.

To me the thought of this happening is kind of funny.  Could you imagine the reaction from everyone when you call TWO strikes on one pitch?  LOL.

I would probably just wimp out and call one strike.

Has anyone ever made this call in a game?

Closest I came was R3, and the batter requested time after F1 had started is motion. F1 stopped and didn't deliver. OHC wanted a balk to score the run. Almost got himself an early dismissal not believing the batter cannot cause a balk. ( "I've been in baseball my whole life and I never heard that before", yada yada). All I could think of was how crazy it would have been had F1 delivered a pitch and not stopped.

It can get pretty crazy. Remember, if the batter steps out, and the ball is delivered, it is a strike no mater where it goes and it's live. Can you imagine the chaos if a batter steps out an 0-2 count, with runners on, F1 uncorks a wild pitch, and we call strike 3?....

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12 hours ago, James88 said:

Building on Richvee's reference to the FED rule, if the batter steps out with both feet AND the pitcher delivers a pitch (any pitch), two strikes are called.  One for stepping out and one for the pitch.

To me the thought of this happening is kind of funny.  Could you imagine the reaction from everyone when you call TWO strikes on one pitch?  LOL.

I would probably just wimp out and call one strike.

Has anyone ever made this call in a game?

Gosh, I wish they would fix the editing on this rule.

 

It WAS that way,.  Then, they changed the rule on automatic strikes to be "if the batter steps out AND delays the game, call a strike."

In the play presented in this thread, the batter did NOT delay the game -- don't call the automatic strike.

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Had a local umpire do this in a district game. TWICE!

The same player was guilty of leaving the box to throw off the pitcher. Second one was for strike three. He had been warned multiple times not to do it. He did it anyways and got called out.

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Gosh, I wish they would fix the editing on this rule.

 

It WAS that way,.  Then, they changed the rule on automatic strikes to be "if the batter steps out AND delays the game, call a strike."

In the play presented in this thread, the batter did NOT delay the game -- don't call the automatic strike.

Although if the batter steps out with both feet and the pitcher stops his motion (doesn't deliver the pitch), that definitely falls in the delay category. I'm for calling THAT strike. But we are still only getting one :)

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

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