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Minor League Baseball Umpire Training Academy

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This will be a dedicated forum for members and guests (No registration required) to post questions related to The Umpire School. A representative from The Umpire School will review and respond to inquiries here. 

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Any chance on a preemptive narrative by a representitive from The Umpire School?  i.e.  cost, length of course, pre registration, requirements, routine, what is provided in the cost, etc.....

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I met several principals of TUS in early 2011 before they were 100% up and running.  They held a free clinic at historic Durham Bulls stadium in NC that lasted an entire day.  Several of the lead instructors ran the clinic and to this day I will say that was without doubt the best instruction I have ever received.  If I had the vacation time to burn and the extra cash I'd go to the full school in a heartbeat.

 

Awesome news that U-E has partnered with them.

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I attended the umpire school this year and I had a great time. The instructors were great, personable and always willing to help. The complex was amazing. Hearing from students who went to Harry's or Jim's who had to travel from class to the field sounded like a hassle and I was glad I didn't have to do that at TUS. The low numbers allowed a lot of reps on the field and time for individual instruction where I heard at other schools that is not the case. Who knows once TUS becomes more popular and the numbers grow if they will be able to offer that advantage anymore.

One of the things I wasn't too keen on was that everything was simulated. Which many of us thought made it more difficult because the speed wasnt there and a great deal of plays weren't being made because the umpires were fielding. I think it would be beneficial to add at least some of live games into the curriculum.

I would recommend TUS to anyone who is looking to improve tremendously on their umpiring skills not just people looking to get into the system.

I think it is great that UE is partnering up and looking forward to good things to come from this partnership.

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It is always good to have a fall back position but if you think school isn't for you now then certainly give pro school a shot.

Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2

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I'll throw my hat in there that I am interested in attending... Very long story short, college is looking more and more difficult to attend for me this year, and I should have the money to attend following my high school grad party.

 

I figure that now at 18 is as good a time as any to go for it... I mean, why not? Worst case scenario, I leave after a month of instruction with a great experience, and I have that diploma under my belt to work my way up into the college ranks. I then get into formal schooling at a community college after a "gap year"... Best case scenario, the obvious. I'm on my way.

 

Many people I've talked to though say that it's smarter to get a college diploma prior to going for it because you will probably need it somewhere down the road. What are your, and the umpire community on UE's, thoughts on attending TUS straight out of high school?

 

Thoughts?

 

Go to college.  

 

It is very hard to make a living umpiring.  

 

I guess I get confused where you say college is going to be tough to attend, but you can drop $4,000 on umpire school for a month.

 

$4,000 is probably a year of tuition at a community college. 

 

It is your life, you can do as you choose, but you should earn some type of degree first.

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Going to college first is good advice.  I will offer the other side of this debate. 

 

As you go through college, get internships, commit to club and group events, develop a relationship with a woman, and generally prepare for a life after college - it becomes extremely difficult to take time off from those commitments.   With every passing day of college, the list of commitments grows.   Personally, my schedule filled up quickly and by the time I was 21, taking 5  weeks off would have been impossible. 

 

That said, I still advised my son to go to college first. 

 

My son Cam will be attending TUS this year, before college.   He will be only 18.   Not the right decision for everyone, but after watching him work for 4 years and receiving consistently positive feedback from umpires, coaches, teachers, family and clinicians, I can't help but agree with his decision.   When he returns, he will have a marketable skill and the training that will allow him to excel in the avocation and earn money while he pursues his education, enters adulthood and his list of commitments grows. 

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There's something to be said for doing what you love, follow a dream. There's also something to said for having a fallback plan. Sometimes, for some people that "gap year" makes it real tough to get back into "school mode",  especially if you're not sure exactly why you're going to school and just taking courses. It's a tough decision, and (please don't take this he wrong way) even tougher to make when you're 18. My advice would be, keep umpiring wherever you're working now, go to Community college with that TUS tuition money. Do your two years there, then decide if you want to give umpiring a legit shot. You'll still only be 20, and you'll have a basics of a 4 year college degree in the bag. Just my  :2cents: .  

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I will go on both sides of this fence.  I work in higher education.  I will advocate getting an education paramount to almost anything.  Education in today's economy breeds opportunity.  That being said.  I went to college and told my father I would go to umpire school once completed.  Well, as Dix stated my plate at that time was full.  I've talked to many and they tell me that pro school will not help me get into D1 in my area.  My network, education, and skill set in 3-man will.  However, that being said I will never most like see a Pac-12 field b/c of who controls the conference.  He likes ex-pro guys.  That is his preference and his right and I don't blame him for it.  If I go this year it is solely based on a better umpiring education.  If it's right for you and you have the opportunity I'd say go for it.  However, if you can get educated and have a fall back and show more maturity, smarts and athletism then the 18 year old fresh off of HS then to me that is the most advantageous way to do it.  Just my $0.02 

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I see many kids take time off before heading to college. So why not go to TUS. Afterwards you can go to college while making better money doing better games.

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There's something to be said for doing what you love, follow a dream. There's also something to said for having a fallback plan. Sometimes, for some people that "gap year" makes it real tough to get back into "school mode",  especially if you're not sure exactly why you're going to school and just taking courses. It's a tough decision, and (please don't take this he wrong way) even tougher to make when you're 18. My advice would be, keep umpiring wherever you're working now, go to Community college with that TUS tuition money. Do your two years there, then decide if you want to give umpiring a legit shot. You'll still only be 20, and you'll have a basics of a 4 year college degree in the bag. Just my  :2cents: .  

 

rich....I completely agree. the gap yr is the hardest part. remotivating yourself to go to school after being in the "real world" can be difficult..thats the danger here. if u can do it by all means go for it just be careful

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 I have known and coached many of talented kids who have "had a dream" to go off and do something for themselves that would have truly made them feel positive and happy about themselves. Only to be given advice that made them put that dream on hold and never do it! Tomorrow is not guaranteed to us. You are a young MAN of 18 years you have the world before you and if you feel strongly enough to man up and put your $4000.00 on the table and further educate your self in something that you feel is positive, fun, you are good at and makes you happy GO FOR IT!! 

 

I will be bold enough to say that you will probably be one of the youngest people in your session, and that in it's self should make you wonder why?  Why are so many older than I interested in further there knowledge of this admirable profession umpiring? 

 

Waterford Michigan is north of Detroit, so I guess it is safe to say that you ump games April through October. This gives you plenty of time to take a few classes at a local community college if you choose. Umpiring is a physical job, so your education and pursuit of a degree is a great idea.

 

Live your dream not mine or anyone else's!  Be happy.  

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I will also say, not to contradict my earlier post b/c I stand by it.

 

The $4,000 you spend to go to school, should pay itself back many, many times over.  If you decide to move, that is a marketable skill you can take with you anywhere.

 

But the advice I would give my own child would be to consider college first.

 

It's likely that to  99.9999999% of us on here, umpiring money is secondary money to our first job. 

 

Retired folks excluded.  You already put in your time.

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Go to TUS for the 4 weeks, then sign up for online, term courses, much like those most of us take in the military.  They are self-paced college degree programs, message me I will show you some schools based on your degree goals. I attained my Bachelor of Science in Sports Management, while being deployed several times, umpiring, and being a committed husband and father. If I can, you can and remeber your only young once, chase your dreams until you pass out.

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Go to TUS for the 4 weeks, then sign up for online, term courses, much like those most of us take in the military.  They are self-paced college degree programs, message me I will show you some schools based on your degree goals. I attained my Bachelor of Science in Sports Management, while being deployed several times, umpiring, and being a committed husband and father. If I can, you can and remeber your only young once, chase your dreams until you pass out.

That is a great suggestion -- BTW I work for a leading online for-profit University. I would be willing to discuss education privately with anybody who has questions. 

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Follow your dreams...Plan your work & work your plan!

 

I bought cars for $4000 that I spent a ton more of cash on them. I had a ball with them and now they are gone except for the memory of the cars.

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Thanks so much to everyone here. It's awesome to know so many people care. I haven't made a decision yet, and I'll definitely need to talk to my family about it, but when I make a decision, you guys will be some of the first to know.

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Wow.  Lots of great advice. You have a lot to think about.

 

Everyone is different and we all different goals and aspirations.  Let me ask you this.  What would you be doing if you could not umpire professionally?  I find this question often leads people to thing long and hard about a "back up" plan.  Many of our umpires take online classes year round to meet their educational goals while still pursuing their umpiring dreams.  However, the majority of our umpires, go to college first and come into the game with that degree in hand.  Many but not all seem better prepared for life on the road, away from home, ability to adjust to the baseball life when they have that degree in hand and have a clear, realistic plan about what they will do when and if they get released.  If you cant honestly answer these questions, it means you are not ready.

 

Keep in mind, we want well rounded individuals who have more to their identity that being an umpire.  

 

I would encourage to explore all your options (both schools) and speak to someone on our staff.  We can help guide you.  

 

Hope this helps.

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Wow.  Lots of great advice. You have a lot to think about.

 

Everyone is different and we all different goals and aspirations.  Let me ask you this.  What would you be doing if you could not umpire professionally?  I find this question often leads people to thing long and hard about a "back up" plan.  Many of our umpires take online classes year round to meet their educational goals while still pursuing their umpiring dreams.  However, the majority of our umpires, go to college first and come into the game with that degree in hand.  Many but not all seem better prepared for life on the road, away from home, ability to adjust to the baseball life when they have that degree in hand and have a clear, realistic plan about what they will do when and if they get released.  If you cant honestly answer these questions, it means you are not ready.

 

Keep in mind, we want well rounded individuals who have more to their identity that being an umpire.  

 

I would encourage to explore all your options (both schools) and speak to someone on our staff.  We can help guide you.  

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

This is very honest advice.  These guys seem to be about more than just tuition dollars.  

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I attended the umpire school this year and I had a great time. The instructors were great, personable and always willing to help. The complex was amazing. Hearing from students who went to Harry's or Jim's who had to travel from class to the field sounded like a hassle and I was glad I didn't have to do that at TUS. The low numbers allowed a lot of reps on the field and time for individual instruction where I heard at other schools that is not the case. Who knows once TUS becomes more popular and the numbers grow if they will be able to offer that advantage anymore.

One of the things I wasn't too keen on was that everything was simulated. Which many of us thought made it more difficult because the speed wasnt there and a great deal of plays weren't being made because the umpires were fielding. I think it would be beneficial to add at least some of live games into the curriculum.

I would recommend TUS to anyone who is looking to improve tremendously on their umpiring skills not just people looking to get into the system.

I think it is great that UE is partnering up and looking forward to good things to come from this partnership.

 I'm just seeing this forum but +1 to what Kyle said. TUS is awesome. A buddy of mine went to Harry's and is considering going back next year and not to knock Harry's but I definitely recommend giving The Umpire School a shot. It's an awesome experience. 

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I'll throw my hat in there that I am interested in attending... Very long story short, college is looking more and more difficult to attend for me this year, and I should have the money to attend following my high school grad party.

 

I figure that now at 18 is as good a time as any to go for it... I mean, why not? Worst case scenario, I leave after a month of instruction with a great experience, and I have that diploma under my belt to work my way up into the college ranks. I then get into formal schooling at a community college after a "gap year"... Best case scenario, the obvious. I'm on my way.

 

Many people I've talked to though say that it's smarter to get a college diploma prior to going for it because you will probably need it somewhere down the road. What are your, and the umpire community on UE's, thoughts on attending TUS straight out of high school?

 

Thoughts?

GO FOR IT NOW! If you have the money to go and no obligations for 4 weeks of your life then go. I'm positive of at least one 18 year old who made it to the PBUC eval course and there may have been more. 

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