Jump to content
  • 0
spark2212

Move towards second while injured

Question

I don’t know if you saw the play a few nights ago where Eduardo Nuñez hurt himself coming down the first base line. He was ruled safe but immediately stumbled to the ground. Now, he landed in fair territory, so for the purposes of tagging him out has he made a move towards second or is this an obvious exception?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Why on earth would falling down count as an attempt to advance? 

It's a myth that anything could be interpreted as a "move toward second" other than clearly and distinctly turning into foul territory.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I don't see an attempt to advance.  Obvious exception to what? Runners ending up in fair territory? Turning toward 2nd?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Remember there has to be an attempt to advance to second. Here it is clear that no attempt was made.

As stated above, and despite what we all learned in little league, the base runner does not have to run into foul territory. 

ALTHOUGH, after looking at the score 14-1, B8 I may call him out. :lol:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Mr. maven, it may be a myth now but from 1887 through 1909 there was a rule that a batter-runner was liable to be put out if he turned left after overrunning first base.

In 1887 a new rule (in rule 53, subparagraph 9) was introduced that said—

If, in over-running First Base, he also attempts to run to Second Base, or after passing the base he turns to his left from the foul line, he shall forfeit such exemption from being put out.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
35 minutes ago, noumpere said:

Those damn umpires from 1909 just don't keep up with the rules changes.

They were more concerned with the length of their handlebar mustaches!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, Senor Azul said:

Mr. maven, it may be a myth now but from 1887 through 1909 there was a rule that a batter-runner was liable to be put out if he turned left after overrunning first base.

In 1887 a new rule (in rule 53, subparagraph 9) was introduced that said—

If, in over-running First Base, he also attempts to run to Second Base, or after passing the base he turns to his left from the foul line, he shall forfeit such exemption from being put out.

Turn or pivot?  I'd bet they meant the same as now which is why they changed the wording..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

As usual, Mr. Rich Ives, you would be wrong. I can provide proof from the BRD, from the Jim Evans manual, and from former major league umpire Billy Evans who worked in the American League from 1906 through 1927.

Billy Evans wrote in the 1922 edition of the book Simplified Baseball Rule Book, “Years ago when a baserunner crossed first base, it was necessary that he turn to the right after so doing. Otherwise he made himself liable to be put out.”

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
2 hours ago, Senor Azul said:

As usual, Mr. Rich Ives, you would be wrong. I can provide proof from the BRD, from the Jim Evans manual, and from former major league umpire Billy Evans who worked in the American League from 1906 through 1927.

Billy Evans wrote in the 1922 edition of the book Simplified Baseball Rule Book, “Years ago when a baserunner crossed first base, it was necessary that he turn to the right after so doing. Otherwise he made himself liable to be put out.”

The umpires were calling the rule as they understood it. So why did they change the wording? I'd still bet they didn't really mean that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...