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Senor Azul

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Everything posted by Senor Azul

  1. I have not found any mention of a lightning policy per se for professional baseball. I have found a few videos on YouTube showing lightning not affecting an MLB game until the lightning was actually over the field. Here’s what I have found so far-- From the 2018 Minor League Baseball Umpire Manual (section 4.4, p. 36): The umpire-in-chief shall be the sole judge as to whether and when play shall be suspended during a game because of unsuitable weather conditions or the unfit condition of the playing field; as to whether and when play shall be resumed after such suspension; and as to whether and when a game shall be terminated after such suspension. He shall not call the game until at least thirty minutes after he has suspended play. He may continue the suspension as long as he believes there is any chance to resume play. The umpire-in-chief shall be the sole judge in determining the length of suspension once “Time” has been called. The umpire-in-chief shall at all times try to complete a game. His authority to resume play following one or more suspensions shall be absolute, and he shall terminate a game only when there appears to be no possibility of completing it.
  2. Let’s see. The OP does not specify a rule set for which he is looking for an answer. Then Mr. Richvee mentions New Jersey as a possible reason for confusion on this subject. I think this is why--a thread posted in the High School forum just three months ago—More insights from NJ dated May 2, 2019. In that thread Mr. LMSANS posted the following— NFHS has informed NJSIAA that there is no rule forbidding the wearing of sunglasses whether they are reflective or not. Sunglasses that produce a glare that affects a defensive or offensive player's ability to see should be individually removed; not collectively as a team. If an umpire judges the sunglasses to be a danger to others they should be removed. The wearing of sunglasses on the bill of the cap or behind the cap (thinking we can't see them) still continues to be prevalent. On cloudy days, if a fielder is wearing sunglasses on top of the cap, it is being worn as an adornment for styling purposes. With information like the preceding out there isn’t understandable and reasonable, Mr. Thunderheads, that a Little League umpire might hold similar ideas? Besides, when he objected that there is no rule book citation to support the answers he was given someone finally posted a one-word reply from the Little League website with no rule cite or explanation or any details. Just one word! And another question for you, Mr. Thunderheads. How does this post-- And you are incorrect in your interpretation—make anyone a rules guru?
  3. I’d like to have further discussion of something Mr. Thunderheads stated earlier in this thread, “Here's the point .... IF IT'S NOT IN THE BOOK AS ILLEGAL ............. then ..........it's legal ... period.” No one took issue with it so I am assuming that everyone agrees with it. Well, let me be the first to disagree with that. An example can be taken from a question posed on this site some time back about whether a batter could try to initiate catcher interference by intentionally stepping back before swinging at the pitch. The resident experts here stated categorically that since there was no rule prohibiting it that it must therefore be legal. I posted an interpretation from the BRD that proved a batter could not do that even though there is nothing in the rule book about it. So, keeping that example in mind, I pose a couple of questions based on OBR for MLB players for your consideration. First, can a player wear white wrist bands? Second, can a base runner ask for time to change shoes? I am pretty sure the answers are not in the rule book. And, yes, I am trying to change the subject a bit and stop the dog piling on Mr. ArchAngel72.
  4. There have been at least two other threads about this issue of more than one ball on the field—one in 2015 and the other in 2018. Perhaps the most famous (probably because it involved two future HOFers) extra ball on the field incident took place on June 30, 1959, at Wrigley Field. Stan Musial took a ball four pitch that got away from the catcher and went all the way to the backstop of Wrigley. Seeing the ball got away Musial started running to first base. The pitcher and the catcher immediately started to argue with the HP umpire Vic Delmore that the reason the ball got away was that the pitch hit Musial's check swing. During the course of the argument Delmore handed a second ball to the catcher. The catcher sees that Musial is on his way to second and overthrows second base with the second ball going into center field. Musial saw the overthrow and started for third base. While all this was happening the third baseman ran in and picked up the first live ball and threw it to the shortstop Ernie Banks who applied a tag on Musial and he was called out. That out was upheld by the umpires after lengthy discussion. Umpire Delmore was let go after the season ended.
  5. In an MLB game played on August 5, 2014, between the Reds and Indians, there was a play involving an extra ball on the field—the umpires kept the ball live: With none out and two on (R1, R3), B1 hit a double to F9, who threw to F4 to F6 as a ball from the defensive bullpen flew onto the field near F4. F6 threw to F5 as R1 dove back to third and was tagged out. OBR Rule 5.01(b) states that after the umpire calls "Play" and until the umpire calls "Time," or until for legal cause (e.g., hit batsman, umpire or offensive interference, foul ball, etc.), the ball is alive. Rule 5.12 lists several additional opportunities to call "Time," including weather/darkness, light failure, an accident, mound visit, examination of baseball, fielder falls out of play, and the umpire orders a person removed. Rule 5.12(b)(8) states, "Except in the cases stated in paragraphs (2) and (3)(A) of this rule, no umpire shall call 'Time' while a play is in progress." According to these rules, the umpire should not kill the ball simply because an extra ball flies onto the field. The circumstance of an extra ball on the field is not listed as an opportunity to stop play.
  6. Since the OP does not specify the rule set his scenario was played under, I can say that Mr. maven is wrong for at least two rule sets. The NCAA code actually has a rule that covers the extra ball on the field situation and FED now has a case play that addresses this question: 2019-2020 NCAA Rule 6 Dead Ball—Play Suspended SECTION 5. Time shall be called by the umpire and play is suspended when: c. An unusual circumstance interferes with the normal progress of the game, such as any crowd action, animal, ball, or other object on the field (see 6-4-a PENALTY); 6-4a PENALTY—The ball is dead at the moment of interference and the umpire shall impose such penalties as to nullify the act of interference; 2018 NFHS Baseball Rules Interpretations SITUATION 5: With one out and a runner on third base, the defense is warming up a pitcher in its bullpen, which is located inside the fence in live-ball territory along the left-field fence. A ball from the bullpen gets past the bullpen catcher and goes to the fence to the left of the catcher. Meanwhile, the pitcher throws a wild pitch that gets past the catcher and goes to the fence to the right of the catcher. The catcher retreats to the fence, picks up the bullpen ball and throws it to the pitcher covering the plate for an apparent out on the runner advancing home. RULING: The runner is safe. Only the game ball can be used to record an out. (1-3-1)
  7. This is scored as just a single with one run scoring—here is the applicable scoring rule. 2019 OBR rule 9.06(f) Subject to the provisions of Rule 9.06(g), when a batter ends a game with a safe hit that drives in as many runs as are necessary to put his team in the lead, the Official Scorer shall credit such batter with only as many bases on his hit as are advanced by the runner who scores the winning run, and then only if the batter runs out his hit for as many bases as are advanced by the runner who scores the winning run. Rule 9.06(f) Comment: The Official Scorer shall apply this rule even when the batter is theoretically entitled to more bases because of being awarded an “automatic” extra-base hit under various provisions of Rules 5.05 and 5.06(b)(4)…
  8. Senor Azul

    Chasing out play

    2019 NFHS Case Book Play 8.4.2 Situation N: R3 is on third with one out when B3 hits safely. R3, while watching the ball, misses home plate. F2 calls for the ball, steps on home to retire R3 and throws to third to get B3 sliding in. RULING: Legal. Runner may be declared out for missing base during playing action upon proper appeal. 2019 NFHS Case Book Play 8.2.2 Situation M: With R2 on second, B2 hits a grounder to left field. R2 touches third base but misses the plate in attempting to score. F7 having thrown home, F2 steps on the missed base to retire R2 and throws to F6 in an attempt to put out B2: (a) before R2 attempts to return home; or (b) after R2 attempts to return to touch home plate. RULING: (a) Upon proper defensive appeal, R2 would be ruled out. (b) Since R2 initiated action prior to the defense touching the plate, R2 must be tagged to record the out. R2 may legally return to touch home if he has not touched the steps of the dugout and if a subsequent runner has not yet scored.
  9. Gil Imber (of Close Call Sports) wrote about runners passing each other on a ground rule double in an article dated September 16, 2016. He labeled the article Case Play 2016-11 Time to Pass a Runner. The game involved the White Sox and the Royals and was played on September 10 of that year (the batter-runner was Tyler Saladino and R1 was Leury Garcia). If the following link does not work perhaps Mr. grayhawk could find video of this play using his MLB subscription. http://mediadownloads.mlb.com/mlbam/mp4/2016/09/11/1156383683/1473559339073/asset_1200K.mp4 After 2016, the MLB Umpire Manual for 2017 wrote, concerning runners passing runners, "Runners passing are not protected from being called out in accordance with Rule 5.09(b)(9) by time being called or other dead ball situation (e.g, ground-rule double, home run, etc.) if they are still in the act of running the bases.
  10. Senor Azul

    Chasing out play

    From the 2018 Minor League Baseball Umpire Manual (section 5.44, p. 60): Official Baseball Rule 5.09(b)(12) states that should a runner in scoring fail to touch home plate and continue on his way to the bench, he may be put out by the fielder touching home plate and appealing to the umpire for a decision. However, this rule applies only where a runner is on his way to the bench and catcher would be required to chase him. It does not apply to the ordinary play where the runner misses the plate and then immediately makes an effort to touch the plate before being tagged… A runner is permitted to return to touch home plate when the ball is dead, as long as the runner has not entered the dugout and there are less than three outs and/or a following runner has not scored. That’s what is supposed to happen. If the catcher in your scenario had stepped on the plate when he made his appeal then the runner should have been called out and the umpire made a mistake in not rendering a decision. If the catcher did not touch the plate then it was his mistake in the appeal and an even bigger one by going into the dugout to tag the runner.
  11. Senor Azul

    Illegal Glove

    2018 NFHS Rule 1-5 ART. 7 . . . If a ball is touched with an illegal glove or mitt, that is discovered by the umpire, the coach or captain of the team at bat has the choice of taking the result of the play or having the award (8-3-3a, b, c) for use of an illegal glove or mitt. The illegal glove or mitt must be replaced immediately. A foul fly caught with an illegal glove/mitt shall be nullified and treated as a foul ball, unless the team at bat elects to take the result of the play. 2018 NFHS Rule 8-3 ART. 3 . . . Each runner is awarded: a. four bases (home) if a fair ball goes over a fence in flight or hits a foul pole above the fence, or is prevented from going over by being touched by a spectator, or is touched by an illegal glove/mitt or detached player equipment which is thrown, tossed, kicked or held by a fielder; b. three bases if a batted ball (other than in item a) is touched by an illegal glove or mitt, or by detached player equipment which is thrown, tossed, kicked or held by a fielder, provided the ball when touched is on or over fair ground, or is a fair ball while on or over foul ground, or is over foul ground in a situation such that it might become a fair ball; c. two bases if a fair batted or thrown ball becomes dead because of bouncing over or passing through a fence, or lodges in a defensive player’s or umpire’s equipment or uniform; or if a live thrown ball: 1. including a pitch, is touched by an illegal glove or mitt, or by detached player equipment which is thrown, tossed, kicked or held by a fielder; or
  12. Senor Azul

    Illegal Glove

    From the 2018 Minor League Baseball Umpire Manual (section 3.7, p. 32): Official Baseball Rules 3.04, 3.05, and 3.06 describe proper glove measurements and should be enforced for all gloves used in Minor League games… Measurements should be made from the front of the receiving side of the glove and the measuring tape should be placed in contact with the glove and follow all contours. An umpire may measure a questionable glove at his discretion, or the opposing manager may request a glove be measured…All measurements will be taken by the umpire between innings only. If the glove is illegal, it will be temporarily confiscated. A player refusing to obey the umpire’s order may be ejected from the game. Play that has occurred prior to the measurement will be allowed to stand…
  13. Senor Azul

    Illegal Glove

    From the 2016 BRD (section 131, p. 104): OBR Official Interpretation: Wendelstedt: A catch made with an illegal glove stands. The glove is removed. Authoritative Opinion: Evans: The penalty (for an illegal glove) is temporary confiscation of the illegal glove. No play or game action shall be nullified because of such an equipment violation. Players who fail to cooperate with an umpire’s order may be ejected. Note (from Carl Childress): OBR treats an illegal glove like an illegal substitute. You toss the sub but keep his plays.
  14. Let’s go to the Wendelstedt manual once again to see how to handle base awards for detached equipment on a batted ball. “The umpire will immediately signal a three base award. The ball is left in play and runners may advance beyond their award at their own peril. If the defense gains possession of the ball, and no runner is attempting to advance, the umpire will call time and award the runners their bases. “If, when the defense gains possession of the ball, at least one runner is attempting to advance, the umpire will leave the ball in play until all action ceases, or until a runner is tagged before reaching his awarded base.” P101: No one on, no outs, 1-2 count. The batter lines the next pitch fair down the first baseline. The right fielder throws his glove and strikes the ball just before the BR reaches first base. The ball shoots farther away into foul territory. When the right fielder finally throws the ball into the infield, the BR (a) has stopped at second base. (b) is tagged while sliding into third base. (c) reaches third base safely. (d) is tagged while sliding into the plate. Ruling: The umpire should signal a three base award when the ball is touched. In (a), the umpire should call time and award the BR third base. In (b), the umpire should call time when the BR is tagged, and award him third base. In (c) and (d), the play stands.
  15. Senor Azul

    LL Rules Question

    Mr. Rich Ives, I copied and pasted the excerpts from the article which means that the word decline which you so object to was in the original and the quote marks around that word are from the original as well. Those quote marks prove that your assertion is just that—an unsupported assertion. Those quote marks are called scare quotes and here’s a definition of the term-- Some writers put quotes around words they want to distance themselves from. Quotation marks used this way are commonly called scare quotes or shudder quotes. It’s a way of implying that you’re using a term in an unusual way or that you don’t necessarily approve of it. They can also be used to emphasize a word or phrase in a sentence in a mocking or annoyed tone. Scare quotes are sort of like air quotes. I think the use of scare quotes in the article around the word decline shows just the opposite of your claim that the writer misunderstands the concept of an intentional base on balls. Why don’t you try to refute the facts in the article rather than criticize the writing style? Let me help you by giving you a couple of facts to start your research. The game the writer cites was the fourth game of the first day of the 2016 LLWS (Thursday, August 18). Little League instituted the no-pitch IBB in the 2017 season. Good luck with your research and I am looking forward to your refutation of the article I posted.
  16. To our guest Jim, Little League (better known as the Majors division) by rule does not call balks. I am not sure whether the illegal stance would make an illegal pitch. A BALK: Baseball is an illegal act by the pitcher with a runner or runners on base entitling all runners to advance one base [Intermediate (50-70) Division/ Junior/Senior League]. A balk is not called in the Little League (Major) Division and below. (See Rule 8.05 - Illegal Pitch.) As for the question of how high the hands can be when stopped in the set position, I was taught that a pitcher could not stop above his head under OBR rules. As noted above, high school actually spells out in its rule 6-1-3 (and in a case play) that the pitcher must come to a stop with his glove at or below his chin. Here’s the only supporting evidence I can find on the subject-- From the 2013 Wendelstedt Rules and Interpretations Manual (p. 211): Play P178: R2, no outs, no count. The pitcher, after indicating the Set Position, stops with his arms high above his head. Ruling: This is a balk.
  17. Senor Azul

    LL Rules Question

    The following excerpts are from an article dated February 2017 written by Tom Robinson for the GameChanger website. Even though Little League announced the rule change as an increase to the pace of play, Mr. Robinson says it really was for the following reason— It was during the 2016 Little League World Series in South Williamsport, Pennsylvania that Goodlettsville (Tennessee) manager Joey Hale and Bend North (Oregon) manager Steve Mora found themselves in a chess match over an intentional walk in the opening game’s decisive inning. Mora went to issue an intentional walk with Bend North, the Northwest Regional champion, trying to close out a 2-1 victory in the bottom of the sixth inning. Hale “declined” the intentional walk, choosing to have Zach McWilliams swing at a 2-0 pitch that was well out of reach in order to try to get starting pitcher Zach Reynolds closer to the 85-pitch limit. With the count now 2-1, Mora changed his mind. He went for and got the first out of the inning. By using six pitches instead of four, however, Reynolds left the game one batter earlier than he would have and the Southeast Regional champions wound up rallying for a 3-2 win… With the new rule in place, the option to turn down an intentional walk in the hopes of driving up pitch counts will no longer be available. This change means managers will not have to figure that into the equation in the future, eliminating an odd Little League situation that would be far less likely to happen on other levels of baseball where pitch limits are not an issue.
  18. Here’s a real example-- On Sept. 14, 2005, the Boston Red Sox defeated the Toronto Blue Jays 5-3 at the Skydome. The difference in the game came courtesy of second baseman Tony Graffanino, who launched a two-run home run in the top of the fifth inning off of Blue Jays starter Josh Towers. The thing is that Graffanino could not complete his home run trot because the runner on first base at the time suffered an injury that didn’t allow him to finish running the bases. Who was that runner? Gabe Kapler. While running around second base, Kapler stumbled and ruptured his left Achilles tendon. Kapler was unable to continue running, which halted Graffanino at first base until Red Sox manager Terry Francona had to substitute a pinch-runner--who turned out to be Alejandro Machado--to finish running the bases for Kapler, allowing Graffanino to finish running the bases as well:
  19. Obviously, Mr. ArchAngel72, you read my post but it seems you did not read the post immediately before mine—the one I responded to. That post stated categorically that there were no other live ball awards besides a base on balls and I was trying to show that there were. Since you want a more relevant-to-the-OP reply, I will give you one. Here’s the actual OBR rule concerning injured runners. 2019 OBR rule 5.12(b)(3) When an accident incapacitates a player or an umpire; (A) If an accident to a runner is such as to prevent him from proceeding to a base to which he is entitled, as on a home run hit out of the playing field, or an award of one or more bases, a substitute runner shall be permitted to complete the play.
  20. 2019 OBR rule 5.06(b) (4) Each runner including the batter-runner may, without liability to be put out, advance: (B) Three bases, if a fielder deliberately touches a fair ball with his cap, mask or any part of his uniform detached from its proper place on his person. The ball is in play and the batter may advance to home base at his peril; (C) Three bases, if a fielder deliberately throws his glove at and touches a fair ball. The ball is in play and the batter may advance to home base at his peril; (D) Two bases, if a fielder deliberately touches a thrown ball with his cap, mask or any part of his uniform detached from its proper place on his person. The ball is in play; (E) Two bases, if a fielder deliberately throws his glove at and touches a thrown ball. The ball is in play;
  21. Senor Azul

    Substitution

    Here’s what the 2016 BRD says about multiple substitution in NCAA and the relevant NCAA rule. Mr, Jimurray, if you read the rule I think you’ll find your concerns about the NCAA ruling on this issue unwarranted. A multiple substitution involving the pitcher going to defense (automatically involves also the DH) must include three players before the coach may shuffle his lineup. EXCEPT: If the DH and pitcher move to defense at the same time, that is a multiple substitution. 2019-20 NCAA rule 5 Substitutions SECTION 5a. Each team shall have nine eligible players in the game at all times. e. If two or more substitute players of the defensive team enter the game simultaneously, the coach or a representative immediately shall designate to the umpire-in-chief the position of each in the team’s batting order. If this is not done immediately, the umpire shall place them in the batting order. Note: When the pitcher is not the designated hitter, moving the pitcher to a defensive position and bringing in only one new substitute player does not constitute multiple substitution for the purpose of batting-order changes. The pitcher moved to the defensive position must bat in the spot of the defensive player replaced and the new pitcher must bat in the DH position.
  22. As of August 3, 2019, there have been 302 no hitters thrown in the Major Leagues. Of those 302, 14 have been combined no hitters. Here’s the breakdown on the number of pitchers involved in the combos and a link to an article detailing all 14 combined no hitters: 6 pitchers—2 times 4 pitchers—5 times 3 pitchers—1 time 2 pitchers—6 times https://www.mlb.com/news/all-the-combined-no-hitters-in-baseball-history
  23. Senor Azul

    Substitution

    Mr. Richvee, I think you might find the following case book play from the FED helpful. 2019 NFHS Case Book Play 3.4.1 Situation G: Team A has had three charged conferences by the fifth inning. With the game tied in the sixth inning, the coach of Team A informs the umpire that (a) F6 and F1 are going to trade positions or (b) that S1 is replacing F1. Can the pitcher who is being replaced return to pitch later in the game, or is this considered a charged conference? RULING: In (a) and (b), the pitcher being replaced may return to pitch as long as all conditions of 3-1-2 Note are met. The umpire shall permit the coach to switch players or substitute, provided the coach does not take advantage of the situation by having a conversation with any of the players. A violation shall result in a charged conference being assessed, which would be more than allowed, resulting in the pitcher not being able to return to pitch. (3-1-2)
  24. Another baseball history question! I love baseball history--thanks for asking. The following excerpt is from the Wikipedia entry for baseball player William “Dummy” Hoy who was deaf but still had a great career in major league baseball. …(Hoy) is sometimes credited with developing the hand signals used by umpires to this day, though this view is widely disputed; Cy Rigler is believed to have created signals for balls and strikes while working in the minor leagues (although, in the November 6, 1886 issue of The Sporting News, the deaf pitcher Ed Dundon is credited as using hand signals while umpiring a game in Mobile, Alabama on October 20 of that year), and Bill Klem is credited with introducing those signals to the Major Leagues, in the early 20th century. Indeed, no articles printed during Hoy's lifetime have been found to support the suggestion that he influenced the creation of signals, nor did he ever maintain that he had such a role… And here’s my theory as to why we as umpires need to be more emphatic on strike three. The hitter is now out and we need to let everyone in the ballpark know it.
  25. Senor Azul

    Fake tag

    I stumbled upon the following case play from the FED while searching for something else and I think it adds a bit of a wrinkle to this thread. 2015 NFHS Baseball Rules Interpretations SITUATION 19: Caught in a rundown between home and third, R2 is returning to third base when the catcher throws the ball to the third baseman who is covering the base. The third baseman does not catch the ball, which is caught by the shortstop who is backing up the play behind third base. Everyone else, including the third baseman, believes the third baseman has the ball when he tags R2 as he slides back into third base. The third baseman shows the umpire an empty glove and is confused as R2 safely slides into third base. The offensive head coach wants the umpire to declare a fake tag and award R2 home. RULING: This is not a fake tag. The third baseman simply did not catch the ball. (2-22-2)
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