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This site appears to be dying a slow death right now.  So, I'll make a contribution.

 

We have some guys on here with some "skins on the wall" who work at a pretty high level.  Guys like Haid and some others (can't think of all their CB Handles right now).  So here's an opportunity for those of you looking to advance your careers - ask these guys anything you want to know about moving up.  It can be anything from what they did to get where they are to travel and everything in between.  Hopefully these guys will contribute and give back a little bit.

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What can an older Umpire do to move up levels?

 
Learn the T-ball rules better?

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What can an older Umpire do to move up levels?

 

Learn the T-ball rules better?

 

But I won't need t-ball rules if I move up!

 

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What can an older Umpire do to move up levels?

You are going to have to outwork everyone younger than you.

If they run, you sprint

If they jog, you run

If they walk, you jog

 

What you should have going for you is the understanding that you aren't entitled to things.  So many younger umpires think they are entitled to bigger and better games and don't understand paying dues and gaining experience.

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What can an older Umpire do to move up levels?

Take an elevator.

 

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What can an older Umpire do to move up levels?

Take an elevator.

 

Stairs would be a better exercise!

 

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What can an older Umpire do to move up levels?

You are going to have to outwork everyone younger than you.

If they run, you sprint

If they jog, you run

If they walk, you jog

 

What you should have going for you is the understanding that you aren't entitled to things.  So many younger umpires think they are entitled to bigger and better games and don't understand paying dues and gaining experience.

 

 

All this sounds great, but we all know that some folks who make these decisions simply will not accept umpires above a certain age, and they are unlikely to change their minds.  Being in great shape (and LOOKING like you are in great shape) can only help.  Perception is so important.

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Grayhawk,  this can be true depending on where you live.  However, regardless of age you can move up with the right network.  Everyone has advantages and disadvantages.  We all have different skills in our tool box.  The key is knowing what yours are on both ends.  This allows you to work on perception and the holes in everyone's game.  Jax, availability will help, being a great crew guy will help.  Being a people person and doting all of your eyes and crossing your tee's when it comes to communication with institutions and assignors.  And finally, working on your network.  One of the best ways for guys to move up is to go to a clinic that the powers that be are at.  It's a micro bubble of them to see and get alot of feedback from instructors on potential candidates for their conferences.  It can get you on there radar one year and then get you a job the next.  Age +/-, availability +/-, athleticism +/-, network +/-, communication +/-, professionalism +/- all of these things and more  can change perception of people on your game.  So know your strengths and weaknesses and address them or showcase them.  Best of Luck

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What can an older Umpire do to move up levels?

You are going to have to outwork everyone younger than you.

If they run, you sprint

If they jog, you run

If they walk, you jog

 

What you should have going for you is the understanding that you aren't entitled to things.  So many younger umpires think they are entitled to bigger and better games and don't understand paying dues and gaining experience.

 

 

All this sounds great, but we all know that some folks who make these decisions simply will not accept umpires above a certain age, and they are unlikely to change their minds.  Being in great shape (and LOOKING like you are in great shape) can only help.  Perception is so important.

 

There are always "some folks" but honestly, I've never heard an upper level assignor say they wouldn't use a guy simply because of his age.

His age + mobility or ability or attitude or something else is another story, but just age alone I've never heard of anyone being overlooked.

 

Now, the reality is if you're just getting started and you're 55, your chances are pretty slim that you are going to get hired in a D-1 conference.  You need to have realistic goals.

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What can an older Umpire do to move up levels?

You are going to have to outwork everyone younger than you.

If they run, you sprint

If they jog, you run

If they walk, you jog

 

What you should have going for you is the understanding that you aren't entitled to things.  So many younger umpires think they are entitled to bigger and better games and don't understand paying dues and gaining experience.

 

 

All this sounds great, but we all know that some folks who make these decisions simply will not accept umpires above a certain age, and they are unlikely to change their minds.  Being in great shape (and LOOKING like you are in great shape) can only help.  Perception is so important.

 

There are always "some folks" but honestly, I've never heard an upper level assignor say they wouldn't use a guy simply because of his age.

His age + mobility or ability or attitude or something else is another story, but just age alone I've never heard of anyone being overlooked.

 

Now, the reality is if you're just getting started and you're 55, your chances are pretty slim that you are going to get hired in a D-1 conference.  You need to have realistic goals.

 

 

Most of these upper level assigners are pretty smart guys, so I doubt they would admit to age discrimination even if they were guilty of it.  However, age is probably used more as a tiebreaker anyway.  There's just no shortage of umpires with just as much rules knowledge, great mechanics, game management skills, etc that are 10-20 years younger than someone in their 40s and 50s.  Why hire the older guy - all other things being equal?  Not saying it's wrong - just that it's the way it is.

 

I think your comment about realistic goals is extremely valuable.  I'm a 48 year old varsity HS umpire, and know that NCAA D1 is out of my reach.  However, since I am in really good shape, and am extremely mobile, I think I have a chance at JC, NAIA and maybe D3 if I continue to improve and get seen by the right people.  I may put my name in for JC at the end of the 2015 HS season if I am getting the right feedback.

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What can an older Umpire do to move up levels?

You are going to have to outwork everyone younger than you.

If they run, you sprint

If they jog, you run

If they walk, you jog

 

What you should have going for you is the understanding that you aren't entitled to things.  So many younger umpires think they are entitled to bigger and better games and don't understand paying dues and gaining experience.

 

 

All this sounds great, but we all know that some folks who make these decisions simply will not accept umpires above a certain age, and they are unlikely to change their minds.  Being in great shape (and LOOKING like you are in great shape) can only help.  Perception is so important.

 

There are always "some folks" but honestly, I've never heard an upper level assignor say they wouldn't use a guy simply because of his age.

His age + mobility or ability or attitude or something else is another story, but just age alone I've never heard of anyone being overlooked.

 

Now, the reality is if you're just getting started and you're 55, your chances are pretty slim that you are going to get hired in a D-1 conference.  You need to have realistic goals.

 

 

Most of these upper level assigners are pretty smart guys, so I doubt they would admit to age discrimination even if they were guilty of it.  However, age is probably used more as a tiebreaker anyway.  There's just no shortage of umpires with just as much rules knowledge, great mechanics, game management skills, etc that are 10-20 years younger than someone in their 40s and 50s.  Why hire the older guy - all other things being equal?  Not saying it's wrong - just that it's the way it is.

 

I think your comment about realistic goals is extremely valuable.  I'm a 48 year old varsity HS umpire, and know that NCAA D1 is out of my reach.  However, since I am in really good shape, and am extremely mobile, I think I have a chance at JC, NAIA and maybe D3 if I continue to improve and get seen by the right people.  I may put my name in for JC at the end of the 2015 HS season if I am getting the right feedback.

 

I'm talking about behind the scenes: at clinics, in private conversations, etc. I've never had an assignor tell me he can't use a guy simply based on age. Now, I've never had a conversation about a 71 year old...

We all know with age comes other issues...namely mobility...and that's what I've heard - "I just don't see how I can use that guy, he's not that mobile and he's not getting any younger."

 

The obvious reality is baseball/umpiring is a young man's game. A young guy has a future to grow and advance, but an older guy who outworks a younger guy is still going to get a look. Young guys come with baggage - entitlement (should be getting more/better games), commitment (their girlfriend/wife doesn't want them to go), off the field (don't have reliable transportation, still think beer is a food group, etc.). 

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Clinics have been great at getting me looked at by higher level guys, and I know they have helped other guys in my HS org. I am not working anything higher than HS yet, but I hope to be and think I am on a good path to get there.

 

A guy in my chapter went to your KC clinic Jason and got hired by John Brauer (sp?) and it wasn't even a college clinic I don't think. So you never know what will come out or who will like you.

 

I know I have seen my mechanics improve dramatically the last couple of years with clinics and the people that make the decisions are noticing I think. I am hoping it is reflected in my schedule in the Spring, but all I can do is keep improving and hope it pays off.

 

I am trying to remember what else you mentioned.

 

What got you your break into the next level Jason? I am trying to remember what you said. I am definitely interested because a lot of D II and D I guys I talked to have minor league and umpire school on their resumes, but what about guys who that is not an option for?

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What got you your break into the next level Jason? I am trying to remember what you said. I am definitely interested because a lot of D II and D I guys I talked to have minor league and umpire school on their resumes, but what about guys who that is not an option for?

Obviously I've been to umpire school, so that helped.  A lot of it was being in the right place at the right time and available to go.

 

I worked a lot for free.  Most college non-con games in our area at that time were on Tuesdays so I'd turn back a paying HS game to go work a D-II game for free.  I gained experience and everyone pretty much left me alone because my partners told the coaches I was working for free.  Eventually those free games turned into splitting the pay and those turned into paid games.  Those veteran guys went to bat for me with supervisors and that's how I got hired.

 

Work scrimmages for free in the fall.  Get to know the college guys in your area and volunteer to work for free with them in the spring.  They'd be a fool to turn down free help and an opportunity to work 3-man or 4-man.

 

Unfortunately, it's becoming more of a business.  Every guy with a schedule wants you to attend "his clinic".  I don't agree with that but I don't make the rules.  So you have to go, work hard, have someone on the staff go to bat for you and jump through the hoops.

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What got you your break into the next level Jason? I am trying to remember what you said. I am definitely interested because a lot of D II and D I guys I talked to have minor league and umpire school on their resumes, but what about guys who that is not an option for?

Obviously I've been to umpire school, so that helped.  A lot of it was being in the right place at the right time and available to go.

 

I worked a lot for free.  Most college non-con games in our area at that time were on Tuesdays so I'd turn back a paying HS game to go work a D-II game for free.  I gained experience and everyone pretty much left me alone because my partners told the coaches I was working for free.  Eventually those free games turned into splitting the pay and those turned into paid games.  Those veteran guys went to bat for me with supervisors and that's how I got hired.

 

Work scrimmages for free in the fall.  Get to know the college guys in your area and volunteer to work for free with them in the spring.  They'd be a fool to turn down free help and an opportunity to work 3-man or 4-man.

 

Unfortunately, it's becoming more of a business.  Every guy with a schedule wants you to attend "his clinic".  I don't agree with that but I don't make the rules.  So you have to go, work hard, have someone on the staff go to bat for you and jump through the hoops.

 

That's a great idea. Never thought about working the scrims. Would be a great way to see college level ball and get to know people.

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This site appears to be dying a slow death right now.  So, I'll make a contribution.

 

We have some guys on here with some "skins on the wall" who work at a pretty high level.  Guys like Haid and some others (can't think of all their CB Handles right now).  So here's an opportunity for those of you looking to advance your careers - ask these guys anything you want to know about moving up.  It can be anything from what they did to get where they are to travel and everything in between.  Hopefully these guys will contribute and give back a little bit.

first of all, ...cool post/thread-topic!

 

second .... "dying a slow death" ... why, because it's off -season for most?

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How many years of umpiring did it take you guys to break into the NCAA ranks?

I started umpiring in 1994.  Started getting college assignments in 1997.  Was hired in a D-2 conference in 2001 and a D-1 conference in 2008.  Obviously a lot of breaking in has to do with availability and ability...although you don't have to have a lot of ability if you are available for a 12:00 start on a Tuesday.  Some of it has to do with being in the right place at the right time (I worked my first D1 game because I was going to watch my friend work and one of the guys on the crew came down with food poisoning before the game).

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second .... "dying a slow death" ... why, because it's off -season for most?

 

Usually by now guys are discussing MLB umpire jock strap preferences or what shoe laces everyone wears.  But this off-season there's not been much going on around here.  I tried stirring up some discussion last year about rules.  Thought I'd try something a little different this year.

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What can an older Umpire do to move up levels?

You are going to have to outwork everyone younger than you.

If they run, you sprint

If they jog, you run

If they walk, you jog

 

What you should have going for you is the understanding that you aren't entitled to things.  So many younger umpires think they are entitled to bigger and better games and don't understand paying dues and gaining experience.

 

 

All this sounds great, but we all know that some folks who make these decisions simply will not accept umpires above a certain age, and they are unlikely to change their minds.  Being in great shape (and LOOKING like you are in great shape) can only help.  Perception is so important.

 

There are always "some folks" but honestly, I've never heard an upper level assignor say they wouldn't use a guy simply because of his age.

His age + mobility or ability or attitude or something else is another story, but just age alone I've never heard of anyone being overlooked.

 

Now, the reality is if you're just getting started and you're 55, your chances are pretty slim that you are going to get hired in a D-1 conference.  You need to have realistic goals.

 

 

Most of these upper level assigners are pretty smart guys, so I doubt they would admit to age discrimination even if they were guilty of it.  However, age is probably used more as a tiebreaker anyway.  There's just no shortage of umpires with just as much rules knowledge, great mechanics, game management skills, etc that are 10-20 years younger than someone in their 40s and 50s.  Why hire the older guy - all other things being equal?  Not saying it's wrong - just that it's the way it is.

 

I think your comment about realistic goals is extremely valuable.  I'm a 48 year old varsity HS umpire, and know that NCAA D1 is out of my reach.  However, since I am in really good shape, and am extremely mobile, I think I have a chance at JC, NAIA and maybe D3 if I continue to improve and get seen by the right people.  I may put my name in for JC at the end of the 2015 HS season if I am getting the right feedback.

 

NOT true. Last year i attended a clinic and a guy who was 61 got hired into the Sunbelt Conference. Dont ever say your too old... too old to make a run at the CWS maybe? just because of the number of yrs you have to have to work Regionals, then super regionals.

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