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Guest Brad

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Guest Brad

At a little league game the batter did not attempt to move out of the batters box when a passed ball took place,

and there was a runner attempting to score from third, Once the catcher retrieved the passed ball, he threw it to the pitcher for the tag out at home,,, but upon doing this, the batter stepped into the play,

and the ball hit the batter.. and caused interference so that the defense could not make the play.

Is this batter interference? is this not interference?.. if it is interference, who is out?

Thank you.

Brad

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Not only is this wrong...it's patently stupid to encourage your RH batter to stay in the box when R3 is coming home...the batter is far more likely to hinder his own player than the defense.

Yes, this certainly sounds like batter INT (it's hard to assess judgment calls based on verbal descriptions). When a batter has time, he must clear the plate area and avoid hindering the defense playi

Eye si' watt ewe did .

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Yes, this certainly sounds like batter INT (it's hard to assess judgment calls based on verbal descriptions). When a batter has time, he must clear the plate area and avoid hindering the defense playing on R3 stealing. If he actually moved into the play, that almost certainly is INT, regardless of the time element.

R3 stealing is a special case for batter INT. With less than 2 out, R3 is out, other runners (if any) return, and the batter resumes his PA. With 2 outs, the batter is out and the inning is over (run does not score).

That's the rule in other codes, and I assume LL is the same on this point.

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Sadly, a lot of young players and misinformed coaches are under the continued idea that the batters box is a safe haven and as long as a batter stays there, they cannot be called for interference. As @mavensaid, it's hard to assess judgement calls on a written or verbal description. I would also add that not only is the batter's box not a safe haven, there can also be interference called on the batter for moving or trying to move out of the batter's box and still being the cause of interference.

Each play is indeed unique and has to be given the umpire's judgement.

~Dawg

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14 hours ago, SeeingEyeDog said:

Sadly, a lot of young players and misinformed coaches are under the continued idea that the batters box is a safe haven and as long as a batter stays there, they cannot be called for interference.

Not only is this wrong...it's patently stupid to encourage your RH batter to stay in the box when R3 is coming home...the batter is far more likely to hinder his own player than the defense.

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9 hours ago, beerguy55 said:

it's patently stupid

i've heard the term "a special kind of stupid" before.........I guess this is it.

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11 hours ago, beerguy55 said:

Not only is this wrong...it's patently stupid

True. But we also have to remember that most of these coaches are parents.  When something like this comes up in youth ball make your call and then between innings tell the coach the correct rule. MOST of them will say 'I didn't know that, thanks'.  SOME will say 'your wrong'. :huh:

Heck, Ive had coaches mad at me for not calling an infield fly with 2 outs and R1, R3,

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1 hour ago, aaluck said:

True. But we also have to remember that most of these coaches are parents.  When something like this comes up in youth ball make your call and then between innings tell the coach the correct rule. MOST of them will say 'I didn't know that, thanks'.  SOME will say 'your wrong'. :huh:

Heck, Ive had coaches mad at me for not calling an infield fly with 2 outs and R1, R3,

My favorite baseball quote of all time is Mickey Mantle, "It's unbelievable how much you don't know about a game you have been playing all your life." One can replace playing with umpiring, coaching and or spectating. As umpires, most of us take annual rules exams and attend field clinics, classroom sessions and or camps. I wonder how the game and the culture of the game would be different if fans, players and coaches were required to study and be tested on the rules? 

~Dawg 

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12 hours ago, aaluck said:

True. But we also have to remember that most of these coaches are parents.  When something like this comes up in youth ball make your call and then between innings tell the coach the correct rule. MOST of them will say 'I didn't know that, thanks'.  SOME will say 'your wrong'. :huh:

Heck, Ive had coaches mad at me for not calling an infield fly with 2 outs and R1, R3,

I'm not talking about rules, I'm talking about common sense.   The batter is between the runner and the plate...doesn't really matter what the rules are at that point...simple geometry and physics should tell the parent-coach that his player has a better chance scoring if the batter gets out of the way.  This isn't even education, it's instinct.   The young player at the plate gets a pass because he's still at an age where he's only aware of himself, and oblivious to his surroundings and situation.   This awareness needs to be taught...by the adults in the room.

There's time to teach/learn the intricacies and subtleties of the rules later (especially the rules that are, to put it one way, deeper)...and teachable moments will come naturally from time to time.  Inexperienced coaches and parents of young players would do well by simply starting with being practical, instead of worrying about what the batter is technically "allowed" to do.  (there's another reason for this...where inexperienced players and coaches reside, also reside inexperienced umpires...and they may or may not know what the coach may or may not know, so it's all moot). 

So, lesson one I would teach the young'uns...right or left-handed...when the pitch goes to the fence, go to the nearest on-deck circle as fast as you can (we'll deal with knowing specifically where the catcher is, and maybe going a different direction, in Lesson two)

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9 hours ago, beerguy55 said:

I'm not talking about rules, I'm talking about common sense.

Sorry, kind of though infield fly rule was common sense.

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