Jump to content

agdz59

Established Member
  • Posts

    345
  • Joined

Everything posted by agdz59

  1. agdz59

    Balks

    NFHS 6-2-5: It is also a balk if a runner or runners are on base and the pitcher... places his feet on or astride the pitcher's plate, or positions himself within approximately five feet of the pitcher's plate without having the ball. OBR 8.05 (i): If there is a runner or runners, it is a balk when the pitcher, without having the ball, stands on or astride the pitcher’s plate or while off the plate, he feints a pitch; Rule 8.05 Comment: Umpires should bear in mind that the purpose of the balk rule is to prevent the pitcher from deliberately deceiving the base runner. If there is doubt in the umpire’s mind, the “intent” of the pitcher should govern. However, certain specifics should be borne in mind: (a) Straddling the pitcher’s rubber without the ball is to be interpreted as intent to deceive and ruled a balk. If I put the ball into play, it is because I think the pitcher is ready to pitch. If he then shows he does not have the ball and,therefore, has deceived me as well as the runner, I most definitely am calling a balk.
  2. agdz59

    Balks

    But if the ball is put into play because the pitcher is making it look like he's ready to pitch, it is indeed a balk in all codes that allow for a balk.
  3. agdz59

    Balks

    Need more info. What level of play /rule set? The team huddles without a coach I take it? And then they break up and the 3rd baseman (F5) takes the ball with him to third base where he tags the runner. I assume the runner is off the base and the umpire has resumed play so the ball is live? Where is the pitcher when play is resumed? That's important. If time is still called and the ball has not been put back in play, it is nothing of course. If play has been resumed and the pitcher is on the rubber in his stance without the ball, yes, it's a balk. If play is resumed and the pitcher is not on the mound (I don't know why the umpire would resume play like this but let's go with it), I don't think that's a balk.
  4. I'm glad you answered this @beerguy55 because the coach's perspective is important. I've seen lots and lots of these this year in the youth / high school level games I do. It is obvious to me it's a pride / dare-type thing with these teenagers and pre-teens. Their teammates are yelling "wear it, wear it!" and they get applause from their dugout when they take one without moving. I've only called it a ball once and that was because it was a catcher who was fighting me on that day's mask protocol. But I've seen one kid take it off his helmet. How long before a kid takes it off his face just to show how tough he is? I'm concerned that a kid is going to get hurt before long, so do I start calling these balls more often at this level in an attempt to get the kids to at least take it off a well protected part of their body? What do you think coach?
  5. Why not? The college rule - right there in the first two sentences - says 1: this is a safety rule and 2: whether a double play is possible is irrelevant. I'll call that in college and high school all day long. It was textbook.
  6. I don't know how to post a tweet but Max Scherzer went off when they had to inspect him. The way they've decided to enforce this policy is a disaster. They should randomly take balls out of play after being pitched and check them. If that's even possible. Putting it on the umpires is, just, ugh.
  7. The tournament i did like this, yes, it reverted to the last full inning.
  8. Oh yeah - thought that was assumed. At least a point. If runners are on, I'll verbalize "Play!"
  9. Agreed. And if you aren't already in the habit, keep your right palm up at the pitcher to indicate "wait" any time the batter is taking signs or getting ready in the box. Especially at the younger levels. Then reset and warn like noumpere says. They'll figure it out pretty quick.
  10. Thank you for that case play Mr. Blue. I can't say I've ever looked for this. Has anyone out there actually called this kind of CI? Bet it always gets a conversation started. I'll need to remember this the next time I'm feeling lonely behind the plate.
  11. @johnnyg08 Thanks for posting the whole collegiate rule. I wish the NFHS rule book had the first two sentences of the college rule. NFHS 8-4-2-b leaves it entirely ambiguous as to the intent as a safey rule that does not require the defense to have had a chance at a double play: Why did they state #2 like that? Because that is what gets thrown back at you by every coach "They aren't required to slide". No coach but their only other option is 8-4-2-b-1: slide away, or avoid contact... Can we also tell NFHS coaches that the Collegiate standard is also the standard for NFHS? it's how they teach it here.
  12. F6 was touching the bag with his left foot with his body toward the pitchers mound and making the throw. R1 went straight in standing up, yes. There was no contact between F6 and R1.
  13. Sure. But I've asked here in the past if hindrance is necessary in High school and been told no. That at this level safety is the key factor. An instructor for our association said something similar. The runner must slide legally or get out of the way, period. Is that not the case?
  14. Because I had it in a summer ball game (NFHS rules) today with 9th-10th graders coached by the Varsity HC. I was on plate and what I saw was the runner go in standing up as the SS was throwing the ball to 1B. The throw was not hindered. I called time, said I had INT at 2B and the BR was also out. HC and his college aged assistant argued there was no hindrance and I agreed with them. I then said the NFHS rule is stricter than that - the runner must either slide legally or move away from the fielder or it is interference. I saw neither, just the runner going in standing. HC said I was wrong but let's go. I told him that's OK you think so. He then said lets look it up and talk about it when we meet again and I said I thought that was a good idea. So I'm considering this my research. 🙂 EDIT: I note the game ending CWS FPSR violation also posted today. My play was very similar except R1 did not hinder the catch or throw at 2B.
  15. I've done one of these. The rule was instituted because there were 6 games per field meaning 12 hours of game time.
  16. I think you did the right thing Dawg. I've taken a game or two past time limits and then thought about the liability I was assuming. No need to do that.
  17. oops! I didn't describe it right. Right handed batter and R2 stealing 3rd. I called ball, batter turned to his third-base-side dugout and tossed his bat toward the next batter to retrieve, then turned and ran to first. While he was passing the plate, the catcher who for whatever reason was late with the throw, had to throw over him. No ill intent, no bad sportsmanship. I called interference and was told later I probably should have let it go. The thinking was the catcher needs to be coached to come outside or inside to make the throw.
  18. I had one of these early this year. The right handed batter turned, threw his bat to his dugout also on the third base side, crossed the plate and ran into the catcher making the throw. I called the interference. My evaluator was there. At the association meeting that night during the "Any interesting plays this week?" portion of the meeting, he invited me to describe the play. The ensuing discussion made it clear most of the vets (and evaluator) would not have made the call for the same reason Wendelstadt gives - it has to be intentional. So now we know.
  19. We will never know that because we don't know what the visiting coach brought up to PU. If he never mentioned BOO, PU was right to do nothing. If he challenged the wrong batter, PU would still not do anything.
  20. I don't think so. A5 batted out of order to end the 5th. A4 was the proper batter. So A5 should have led off the 6th. What we don't know is what the home head coach said about A10 when he entered. If he told the umpire A10 was pinch hitting for A5, all is good. I'm not sure about OBR but if the coach said nothing about A10 before he showed up in the batter's box, he became an unannounced substitution for A5. A6 properly batted in the second spot in 6th in all codes. Correct?
  21. There is a lot of very useful feedback here and I appreciate it. If I might, please allow me to provide a little more color on what was going on, and what happened after, I talked to the fence. I am risking digging my hole even deeper than it already is, but giving the metrics you are providing in the recent posts here, I think I might be OK. My partner that weekend is someone who has been an umpire in these parts for years and has a deserved reputation for being hard to work with. He's been banned from different tournaments and assignors use him as a last resort because they are tired of dealing with angry coaches, parents and partners. That weekend, the tournament organizer was a fellow umpire who gave my partner work because, as he admitted to me, he wanted to give him another chance. Frankly, he had me work with him because I said I was willing. Saturday was typical. Balkfests at 12U for the slightest infraction, bizarre conversations at plate meetings and engaging coaches on trivialities that only served to piss them off. So early Sunday with that close play at first and I hear the grumbling behind me, I made the decision to try to ease the tension with my remark. That's the context. I do not typically talk to the fence at all. So what was the result with my assignor for that tournament? He called me Sunday night to thank me for helping keep things on our field under control. That he had heard from many people on both sides of the fence that appreciated my efforts. And, as I've seen other times, one coach told him that if my partner was going to be at the tournament next year, he would not be bringing his team. We ended by talking about how to improve the tournament next year. This last weekend I worked another tournament where two coaches talked to me personally and thanked me for how I handled things there. So, from the feedback I have received from assignors and coaches, I think I made an ok decision given the circumstances. Again, I appreciate the feedback I've gotten here. You guys are awesome, really.
  22. agdz59

    Base running

    A side note to your side note. Man, oh man this is so true. If any of these youth travel team coaches asked me for advice I would tell them to do two things 1) assign an assistant coach to be watching for missed bags while they are on defense and 2) coach your infielders that if they are not involved in a play to the outfield - instead of standing their watching and get called for obstruction when the runner bowls them over, watch runners for missed bases and teach them how to properly appeal. They will win games because of those two things, I can guarantee it.
  23. agdz59

    Base running

    So, a runner is put out twice: once with a tag, non-forced out and then again on appeal for a force out. Purely a guess but I would allow the appeal to supercede the tag since I don't see a real difference between this and any other play that is appealed. If the appeal is allowed, no runs score.
×
×
  • Create New...