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Guest Warren

Intentional Walks

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Guest Warren

Count 1 ball and no strikes. 2 out. After the second pitch to the batter, the defensive manager notifies the plate umpire that he would like to intentionally walk the batter. Simultaneously, the offensive manager notifies the plate umpire that he would like to enter a pinch hitter. What would the ump do? Put the new batter into the game and then send him to first on the intentional walk or just send him to first without the substitution?

 

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1 hour ago, Guest Warren said:

After the second pitch to the batter, the defensive manager notifies the plate umpire that he would like to intentionally walk the batter.

So the count is now 2 balls, 0 strikes, right? As a baseball guy, I'd have a real hard time buying an intentional walk on 1-1, unless that first strike was a foul ball that where the Batter just missed tee'ing one up, the pitcher doesn't have a good track record against that batter, and the batter likely ain't going to miss again.

In any case, an Intentional Walk (IBB) is a Dead-Ball Award. Time is called by the Plate Umpire, and the Batter is signaled/directed/instructed to take 1B. Thus, the calling of "Time" is at the request of the defense, thus, the IBB has to be enacted. With Time (already) called, the offense then contacts / approaches the PU, and indicates he wants to substitute. At this point, is he substituting a pinch runner for the (new) R1, or a Pinch Batter for the upcoming Batter?

This proceeds in sequential steps, guys... just like there are "no ties in baseball", there are no simultaneous requests for Time.

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To our guest, Warren, what rule set was your game played under? It does make a difference. For example, in Little League the intentional base on balls has to be requested before a pitch has been thrown. Here’s the answer for the Official Baseball Rules (OBR) found in the 2018 Minor League Baseball Umpire Manual (section 10.1, p. 135) (bold emphasis added):

If the defensive team's manager notifies the umpire that he would like to intentionally walk the batter,

·        Prior to the at-bat beginning:  As the batter approaches the plate the umpire will call "Time," the ball is dead, and the umpire shall award the batter first base and advance any other runner(s) forced to advance by the batter being walked.

·        During an at-bat:  The umpire will call "Time," the ball is dead, and the umpire shall award the batter first base and advance any other runner(s) forced to advance by the batter being walked.

If a substitute batter is being entered into the game, the plate umpire should confirm and officially signal the batter into the game prior to addressing the defensive Club's request to intentionally walk the batter.

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8 hours ago, Guest Warren said:

Simultaneously, the offensive manager notifies the plate umpire that he would like to enter a pinch hitter.

The question has a false premise. There's no such thing as simultaneous in baseball.

Something happened first. The other guy gets to make his decision based on that.

Sometimes, you just gotta umpire.

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8 hours ago, Senor Azul said:

To our guest, Warren, what rule set was your game played under? It does make a difference. For example, in Little League the intentional base on balls has to be requested before a pitch has been thrown. Here’s the answer for the Official Baseball Rules (OBR) found in the 2018 Minor League Baseball Umpire Manual (section 10.1, p. 135) (bold emphasis added):

If the defensive team's manager notifies the umpire that he would like to intentionally walk the batter,

·        Prior to the at-bat beginning:  As the batter approaches the plate the umpire will call "Time," the ball is dead, and the umpire shall award the batter first base and advance any other runner(s) forced to advance by the batter being walked.

·        During an at-bat:  The umpire will call "Time," the ball is dead, and the umpire shall award the batter first base and advance any other runner(s) forced to advance by the batter being walked.

If a substitute batter is being entered into the game, the plate umpire should confirm and officially signal the batter into the game prior to addressing the defensive Club's request to intentionally walk the batter.

I don't do much LL, but I thought if a pitch was thrown, the difference is that remaining pitches on an IW would be added to the pitch count. ?

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22 minutes ago, Tborze said:

I don't do much LL, but I thought if a pitch was thrown, the difference is that remaining pitches on an IW would be added to the pitch count. ?

Off topic and you can't start an IBB in mid AB in LL. It has to be before a pitch is delivered.  And you add 4 pitches to the pitch count

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Guest THANK YOU

I found the rule reference. It is not for LL. Thank you to all that helped me.

As it happens in mid at bat, the new batter is subbed in and then you proceed with the defensive request.

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Unfortunately, it seems that we are not going to get a response from the OP to Mr. yawetag’s request for a rule citation nor to my request for information about which rule set he wanted to know about. So now might be a good time to hijack this thread by bringing the following old question up again.

A few years back a question was asked about a smart defense recognizing that the batter at the plate was batting out of order. They wanted to ensure they got an out so they intentionally walked the BOO batter and then made their appeal. Is this a legal maneuver? Would you honor the appeal and call the correct batter out for MYTAB?

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1 hour ago, Senor Azul said:

Unfortunately, it seems that we are not going to get a response from the OP to Mr. yawetag’s request for a rule citation nor to my request for information about which rule set he wanted to know about. So now might be a good time to hijack this thread by bringing the following old question up again.

A few years back a question was asked about a smart defense recognizing that the batter at the plate was batting out of order. They wanted to ensure they got an out so they intentionally walked the BOO batter and then made their appeal. Is this a legal maneuver? Would you honor the appeal and call the correct batter out for MYTAB?

You're damn right I will. The offense messed up, the defense knew the rule and how to use it to their advantage. 

As for the OP, it's whoever asks first. If I can't tell who asked for time first, whoever I talk to first based off of the coin-flip in my head gets their request.

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23 hours ago, Senor Azul said:

Unfortunately, it seems that we are not going to get a response from the OP to Mr. yawetag’s request for a rule citation nor to my request for information about which rule set he wanted to know about. So now might be a good time to hijack this thread by bringing the following old question up again.

A few years back a question was asked about a smart defense recognizing that the batter at the plate was batting out of order. They wanted to ensure they got an out so they intentionally walked the BOO batter and then made their appeal. Is this a legal maneuver? Would you honor the appeal and call the correct batter out for MYTAB?


Legal, yes.

Honor the appeal and call the batter out, yes I did.

 

Been there, done that.  Didn’t get a t-shirt though.

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The text I quoted earlier from the 2018 MiLBUM can also be found in the 2017 MLBUM. However, I did not quote the whole thing. That interpretation goes on to say (same section, same page)—

Keep in mind a few additional points…

·        Once the defensive manager notifies the umpire he would like to no-pitch intentionally walk the batter, it will be too late for the defense to successfully appeal the following:

-- a missed base or a base left too soon

--half-swings

--an improper batter (batting out of order)

--misapplication of a rule (protest)

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