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yawetag

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Everything posted by yawetag

  1. I just got an email that was sent to about 200 umpires in the state from an LLC that was set up less than a month ago. They got my name through an assigner I've never used in the state. Apparently, I can get money - don't know what they're keeping. I flagged it as spam and will send an email to the assigner (and the groups he's with) to complain about his giving my information without my permission.
  2. If you're taking the stance to put the PU behind the mound, you'd just be better off doing one-man mechanics on a small field.
  3. yawetag

    Ads, Redux

    Lucky you. I've gone from Desklandia (where I spend 8+ hours talking to people who apparently aren't in my house - strange) to Couchtopia to Bedopolis.
  4. yawetag

    Ads, Redux

    There are places other than home? What are these magical places?
  5. yawetag

    Ruling on this play

    You all forgot the most important variable: Day game or night game?
  6. That "short term" is based solely on the fact that social distancing might actually be helping. Take that away and the short-term needs increase exponentially.
  7. Or don't officiate. I'll extend this to umpires agreeing to officiate. We can all wait a few more months, right?
  8. If a ball rolls under a fence or becomes lodged in/under the fence, it's a dead ball and all runners get two bases from TOP. If fielder raises his arms and umpire is able to determine the ball was lodged or went under, then ball would be considered dead at the time the fielder raised his arms. In this situation, though, fielder raised arms and before the umpire could determine the status of the ball, fielder picks up the ball and throws it in. At this point, ball is still live and all action continues. Any play stands, unless an umpire can say for certain the ball actually was lodged or went under - which is almost impossible to claim without going out and looking. Also, if you can physically see the fielder reach under the fence to grab the ball, you can kill the play. B1 advancing at all (even to 2B) is at his own choice and is liable to be put out, as long as an umpire doesn't kill it. I'm fairly sure there's a case play in the Fed casebook that deals with this exact play.
  9. And remember - this is only on a U3K situation when the batter is able to advance (1B open with less than two outs, any time with two outs).
  10. I'd say to always keep U1 in A position. It gives you an extra set of eyes on fair/foul down that line (which he'll have all calls down that line) and prevents the two of you from essentially being on top of each other. Be ready to get the best position you can on fly balls down the LF line. Any line drives or grounders - give it the best you can. Covering the bases will be tricky. Being there's no real guide for this, it might have to be a case of "see a hole, fill a hole" for the first week or two. If you've got partners who are just as serious as you, you'll begin to see how you can adjust based on situations. There might be times BU watches the touch of 1B by BR, then hustles down the line to cover HP, all while PU is covering the infield. You might have times where PU covers anything on the left side of the infield and HP while BU covers the right side and 2B. Maybe Williamsport will scrabble together some guidance, but you'll probably find it's lacking, too. Just do the best you can.
  11. That's opening a different can of worms. I think we've all worked with the "If I point with the left hand, don't call it a strike!" umpire. My comment back has always been "I have trouble with my directions - and definitely when you're facing me."
  12. Welcome to the "About Us" forum. I'll spare the humdrum of my life, other than to say I'd love for the two kids to get out of my hair. Their schools are doing the best they can given the very little notice they had, and my work has told us to work from home until the unforeseeable future. My job is directly related to tens of thousands of office buildings across this country, which means many of our employees in the branches have been furloughed. Here in the corporate office, my department has been spared, but can't say the same for many others I work around. Any one who still remains has taken pay cuts of varying percentages - I've been told our department was on the low end. Personally, we've had to move our family trips back a year. We were heading to Los Angeles in July and Japan next year. With the Olympics pushed back a year, though, we're pushing that to 2022. All my family has been safe so far, and that's all I can ask.
  13. If you can show 70,000 people so far have committed suicide since the outbreak, then I'll agree we're on the same moral high-ground. We could easily move this discussion to one where we have a society and government that takes care of its people, so that losing a job doesn't lead someone to think suicide is the only answer. You know, free mental health (OH NO!) or temporary unemployment that actually keeps someone afloat (THE NERVE!), or maybe even a social policy that allows someone the means to keep their family healthy, fed, and housed while they can't work (COMMUNISM!!!). There's no irony that the vast majority of the "OPEN OUR STATES!" people are the same ones that think any of those three are bad ideas.
  14. When you go to a restaurant or get your hair cut or attend a sporting event, you rely upon others to do the things needed to make that experience happen. You see, for those who think opening the country today - whether it's for their own job or for their own entertainment - requires others to also work. And while you insist people have a choice to go out or not, the reality is that many of the employees don't.
  15. Almost every one of those who died in nursing homes didn't leave the confines of the building.
  16. While others are helping you with the actual question, I'll be the semantics police. If the ball hits the batter - its fair/foul determination has yet to be made. Therefore, you can't say "after hitting a fair ball" because that would imply that when the ball was over fair territory, it was either (a) touched by a fielder or a runner, or (b) bounded past 1B or 3B. In your situation, it's done neither, so it's neither fair nor foul.
  17. Not offended at all, and something I meant to add to my post. You said it the same way I meant.
  18. One of the wisest things I've heard recently, and more related to journalists looking for sources: If you're talking to a doctor or a scientist about COVID and they don't say "I don't know..." or something similar during the conversation, you need to find a new doctor or scientist to source. So much about this is unknown that anyone who thinks they have the answers most definitely doesn't.
  19. Two more factors to consider: 1. How much baseball experience does this person have? How much experience in other sports? 2. How much officiating experience does this person have, in any sport? One thing I learned doing volleyball this year is that being able to anticipate what's going to happen can help so much in how you approach a particular situation. Because I had no experience in volleyball, it was hard for me to have that forethought. However, having officiating experience helped in a lot of things, such as game management. Just feeling comfortable in the pressure of a close match allowed me to keep calm during crucial moments. I say this because so much of what you consider obvious may not necessarily be so to an outsider. Consider the student before you consider your teaching. As for the rule book, I'll second the definitions. From there, start with the obvious - the basics of safe/out, strike/ball, fair/foul (this one could be long, depending on their ability to grasp it). And every time you continue, make sure to go back to applicable definitions. The best officials never stop reading the book. The best teachers always return to what's been learned.
  20. This might be an unpopular opinion, but I'll say it anyway. Any youth baseball league that runs a season this year can never again claim safety is their top priority.
  21. Start with the rule book, please.
  22. They need to get guidance from professionals. This would be state medical professionals and people from Little League. As @JonnyCat says, this isn't the UIC's job.
  23. yawetag

    Zebra Web

    In general, no. CSV uploads can't easily compare what you already have on the calendar to determine what needs to be removed, added, or edited; it'll just add everything in the CSV to what's already there.
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