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NFHS rules -- backswing interference vs. follow-through interference


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Hi guys, I'm moving up this year from rec league ball to high school; we are under the 2020 NFHS rule book (yes, 2020, not 2021).  I'm studying the rules, and for the life of me I cannot figure out what backswing interference refers to ("...prior to time of pitch...").  I also cannot figure out how it is different from follow through interference. 

Help me understand?

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The term , “ backswing interference “ pertains to two different things in FED vs OBR. In FED, as others have explained, it’s simply the bat hitting the catcher or his glove prior to a pitch.  when thi

In NFHS terms, "backswing" means when they're warming up, taking practice swings in the box, and getting ready to hit. "Follow-through" is what happens after they swing at a pitch.

It's important to distinguish these, as the penalties are different. The penalty for follow-through INT is the same as batter INT. Other codes don't give this a different name because it's really

In NFHS terms, "backswing" means when they're warming up, taking practice swings in the box, and getting ready to hit. "Follow-through" is what happens after they swing at a pitch.

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It's important to distinguish these, as the penalties are different.

The penalty for follow-through INT is the same as batter INT. Other codes don't give this a different name because it's really just batter INT.

The "penalty" for backswing INT is just to kill it and reset. It's not really INT at all, because the defense isn't hindered (so the batter isn't out).

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2 hours ago, kylehutson said:

In NFHS terms, "backswing" means when they're warming up, taking practice swings in the box, and getting ready to hit. "Follow-through" is what happens after they swing at a pitch.

Usually when the batter does his "waggle" over the plate and then moves the bat back to raise it up to / above his back shoulder as the pitcher comes set (or acknowledges the  sign from the catcher).

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The term , “ backswing interference “ pertains to two different things in FED vs OBR. In FED, as others have explained, it’s simply the bat hitting the catcher or his glove prior to a pitch.  when this happens, call time and reset. 

The TERMS “ follow through interference “ in FED, and “ BACKSWING INTERFERENCE “ in OBR, pertain to the same thing... when the batter swings so hard he comes all the way around and hinders the catcher’s attempt to make a play on a runner. That’s the similarities. What differs is the penalty. In FED, it is treated exactly the same as batter interference. In OBR, the runner is simply returned to his TOP base. The batter is not out. 

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15 hours ago, maven said:

It's important to distinguish these, as the penalties are different.

The penalty for follow-through INT is the same as batter INT. Other codes don't give this a different name because it's really just batter INT.

The "penalty" for backswing INT is just to kill it and reset. It's not really INT at all, because the defense isn't hindered (so the batter isn't out).

So as to penalty, let me make sure I get this right.  There is no penalty for a backswing INT because it didn't interfere with a play (happened during the batter's warm up, etc.).  

So let's look at a follow-through INT, adjudicated the same was as batter's INT.  The pitch is delivered, and R1 takes off for 2nd.  The batter swings, and his follow-through hits the catcher, who is trying to throw down to 2nd.  The follow-through interfered with the catcher's ability to make play, thus, follow-through INT.  The defensive player at 2nd failed to make the tag in time to get the out.  

*IF* there are two strikes against the batter and this pitch was strike 3, then BOTH the batter and runner are out.

If the batter did not strike out on this pitch, then the batter is out for INT and the runner is sent back to first.  

Changing it up a little, if the play got the runner out at second, then you ignore the INT.

Am I understanding this correctly?

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3 minutes ago, mac266 said:

So as to penalty, let me make sure I get this right.  There is no penalty for a backswing INT because it didn't interfere with a play (happened during the batter's warm up, etc.).  

So let's look at a follow-through INT, adjudicated the same was as batter's INT.  The pitch is delivered, and R1 takes off for 2nd.  The batter swings, and his follow-through hits the catcher, who is trying to throw down to 2nd.  The follow-through interfered with the catcher's ability to make play, thus, follow-through INT.  The defensive player at 2nd failed to make the tag in time to get the out.  

*IF* there are two strikes against the batter and this pitch was strike 3, then BOTH the batter and runner are out.

If the batter did not strike out on this pitch, then the batter is out for INT and the runner is sent back to first.  

Changing it up a little, if the play got the runner out at second, then you ignore the INT.

Am I understanding this correctly?

You got it. 

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There is a caveat in FED, that says when it's strike three, and the batter interferes, the runner is out "if the umpire believes the catcher had a chance to throw out the runner" If. in the judgment of the umpire, the catcher had no chance at throwing out the runner, the runner can be returned to his TOP base. There's many discussions on this rule  throughout this site. My 2cents on this rule.... this ruling should be used sparingly. If that runner isn't standing on, or within a step or so of the base he just stole  when the pitch crosses the plate, I'm calling him out.

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1 hour ago, mac266 said:

*IF* there are two strikes against the batter and this pitch was strike 3, then BOTH the batter and runner are out.

If the batter did not strike out on this pitch, then the batter is out for INT and the runner is sent back to first.  

Changing it up a little, if the play got the runner out at second, then you ignore the INT.

Am I understanding this correctly?

So far, so good. If F2's first throw retires a runner, then clearly he wasn't sufficiently hindered to warrant the penalty, so the rule ignores the action at HP and the penalty lapses. Correct.

There are complications with R3 stealing, but you didn't ask about those. I mention them only because the general question seems to be "what is the generic penalty for batter INT, which also applies to follow-through INT," and this generic penalty also applies (though not to your example of R1 stealing 2B).

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26 minutes ago, noumpere said:

It can also happen on a D3K, especially (but not exclusively) if the ball gets more than a few feet away from F2.

 

I agree with the general conclusion, though.

That's slightly complicated by the fact that the batter will have additional constraints, including to GTFOOTW. Not garden-variety batter INT, and probably not going to be follow-through INT either.

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On 3/11/2021 at 8:40 AM, maven said:

So far, so good. If F2's first throw retires a runner, then clearly he wasn't sufficiently hindered to warrant the penalty, so the rule ignores the action at HP and the penalty lapses. Correct.

There are complications with R3 stealing, but you didn't ask about those. I mention them only because the general question seems to be "what is the generic penalty for batter INT, which also applies to follow-through INT," and this generic penalty also applies (though not to your example of R1 stealing 2B).

Ok, so R3 stealing and we have either a backswing interference or batter's interference (adjudicated the same way, so take your pick).  

In this case, if it was strike 3, both the batter and runner are out.

If it was not strike 3, the RUNNER is out instead of the batter, EXCEPT if it was the third out -- then the batter is out anyway so he doesn't get to start at bat the next inning.

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