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ticky tack balks or not


Guest Assistant Coach K

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Guest Assistant Coach K

 

 

1) Pitcher is in stretch, gets signs, starts to lean up, but leans back down again either quickly or to get a sign again.  A) did not lift his foot but still leaned up and down, b) lifted his foot but put down in same spot, c) lifted and either further or closer

 

2) Pitchers foot/feet are on the mound and foot/feet in rubber, and is standing there throwing the ball in his glove or moving arms legs , checking his glove, etc.  Cant tell the difference if his about to pitch or not as has very minimal delivery.

 

3) right handed pitcher from stretch is set. He puts his head down to peak at runner but you can see ever so slightly shoulder move doing this. Never see it called  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Guest Assistant Coach K said:

1) Pitcher is in stretch, gets signs, starts to lean up, but leans back down again either quickly or to get a sign again.  A) did not lift his foot but still leaned up and down, b) lifted his foot but put down in same spot, c) lifted and either further or closer

Assuming runners are on base, this is a balk. Coming set needs to be a single, uninterrupted motion. Not sure which foot you mean or what that has to do with the motion to come set.

5 minutes ago, Guest Assistant Coach K said:

2) Pitchers foot/feet are on the mound and foot/feet in rubber, and is standing there throwing the ball in his glove or moving arms legs , checking his glove, etc.  Cant tell the difference if his about to pitch or not as has very minimal delivery.

Once engaged, F1 may do just 3 things: pitch to the batter, step and throw/feint to a base, or disengaged. None of these actions are among those 3; with runners on, this is a balk.

6 minutes ago, Guest Assistant Coach K said:

3) right handed pitcher from stretch is set. He puts his head down to peak at runner but you can see ever so slightly shoulder move doing this. Never see it called  

"Ever so slightly" anything should never be called in amateur baseball. Life is too short for that.

F1 may not "turn his shoulders" to look at a runner, because doing so constitutes a feint. So if F1 does this to 1B, it's a balk for feinting a throw to 1B, not because the shoulder motion itself is illegal.

That's why at MOST I would call time and tell F2 to go out and get his F1 not to turn his shoulders. If it's big and obvious, no choice but to call the balk. But "ever so slightly" is ignorable 100% of the time.

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Some of this is going to be level-dependent, but:

1) Balk

2) The pitcher is allowed to "make himself comfortable" on the rubber, and if the actions you describe are momentary and part of that, I'd allow it.  If they are extensive or after that action, I'd call it.  I suspect you are describing the latter, especially the part about throwing the ball in the glove.

3) Not a balk if the shoulder movement is slight and only what is needed to move the head.

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Guest Assistant Coach K

Thanks

1) i cant count how many times i have seen pitchers lean down to look at sign and maybe cant see again and try to lean closer, or just do it twice quickly for no reason at all

2) @noumpere yes im leaning towards play ended, live ball, his feet are in/on the rubber could even be facing 2nd base.  Usually actions that pitchers do off the rubber.

3) ok, thats why i never see it called then... Thanks!

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Thanks

1) i cant count how many times i have seen pitchers lean down to look at sign and maybe cant see again and try to lean closer, or just do it twice quickly for no reason at all
 

If he’s leaning in, then leans in a little more that’s fine. What will trigger a balk is after getting a sign, starting to come set ( maybe even the start of the arms coming together) , and then an “ oh wait” moment where he stops, and looks back in for another sign. 

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The following case book plays are how high school rules would answer the OP’s question 2. And then an OBR interpretation from the Wendelstedt manual (2013 edition, p. 103) to add to the previous answers for question 3.

2019 NFHS Case Book play 6.1.3 Situation E:  With R1, F1, in a set-position stance with the ball in his gloved hand and his pitching hand at his side, takes his sign. He removes the ball from his glove and goes to a set position. RULING:  This is a balk.

2019 Case Book play 6.1.3 Situation F:  With R1, F1 receives the ball from F2 and with his feet in set position stance and in contact with the pitcher’s plate (a) nervously tosses ball in glove two or three times, or (b) removes the ball from his glove. RULING:  This is a balk in (a) and (b). Restrictions on F1’s movements begin when he intentionally contacts the pitcher’s plate with his pivot foot.

***

“A pitcher turning his shoulders is not, in itself, a feint to a base. It is almost impossible for a pitcher to turn to check a runner at a base behind him without turning his shoulders.”

And so ends our lesson on human anatomy for today.

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