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Guest Strike In Decatur

When the plate umpire makes a particularly good or bad call, the camera will often zoom in on the face. The umpires always seem to be aware of the camera zoom as well.

I don't expect any real first-hand knowledge replies, but I'd love to hear opinions about whether/how the umpires know the camera is on their face.

I also wonder if the umpire feels corrected or possibly confirmed by the zoom shot following their close call.

Thanks!

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27 minutes ago, Guest Strike In Decatur said:

When the plate umpire makes a particularly good or bad call, the camera will often zoom in on the face. The umpires always seem to be aware of the camera zoom as well.

I don't expect any real first-hand knowledge replies, but I'd love to hear opinions about whether/how the umpires know the camera is on their face.

I also wonder if the umpire feels corrected or possibly confirmed by the zoom shot following their close call.

Thanks!

There's always a camera on the home plate umpire on any broadcasted MLB game.  It's not a matter of knowing when.

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10 hours ago, Guest Strike In Decatur said:

 

I also wonder if the umpire feels corrected or possibly confirmed by the zoom shot following their close call.

Thanks!

Although I am quite sure umpires are aware when a camera is pointing at them (and there's a good chance at least one of the stadium cameras is pointing at the plate ump always), I have yet to meet a single human being who (without being told) knows if the camera operator is using a zoom shot...that doesn't happen until you see the video after the fact.

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As for the (college) games I have worked that have been televised, I never have a clue.  Hopefully, one is so focused on the game that one even forgets that the cameras are there (that has certainly been the case for me).  I certainly don't have the time during a game to try and figure out which camera has the red light on and then determine if that camera is focused on me.  

As you can see from my (logo/avatar/whatever-its-called) on this website, my wife captured that picture as she was watching at home on her laptop. And, as you can see, I had no clue that the camera was on me.

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Guest NeuroUmp

Stare detection is a fascinating field of study. We can accurately make conscious decisions using visual input in our direct gaze and only 4% of our peripheral vision on either side of our gaze. Two reasons we often consciously "guess/decide" inaccurately about being stared at: 1) humans are highly attuned to stare detection (for reasons of love and survival), and 2) our confirmation biases tend to misinterpret 96% of the data on each side of our periphery ("rose-colored glasses").

The subconscious aspect of stare detection is definite, variable among subjects, and less understood. A 2013 study showed that blind subjects showed the same activity in the amygdala (threats and arousal) as sighted subjects when handed a photo of a person staring at them. This tells us that the visual cortex is helpful, but not determinative for stare detection. Theories with less-than-solid proof at this point in our understanding suggest inclusion of subconscious input from external sources (e.g., collective consciousness).

It is my belief that the umpire in question has observed the "bad call zoom" repeatedly on television and therefore reacts subconsciously, based on conscious and subconscious inputs, when he or she may have made a bad call. The umpire's ability to focus may prevent the conscious mind from even being aware of the internal conflict showing on his or her face.

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Wow. It will take me a while to unpack that.

I have never called a game on tv, and likely never will, but I assume I am being watched after any close call and am very conscious to have on my poker face.

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21 hours ago, Guest NeuroUmp said:

Stare detection is a fascinating field of study. We can accurately make conscious decisions using visual input in our direct gaze and only 4% of our peripheral vision on either side of our gaze. Two reasons we often consciously "guess/decide" inaccurately about being stared at: 1) humans are highly attuned to stare detection (for reasons of love and survival), and 2) our confirmation biases tend to misinterpret 96% of the data on each side of our periphery ("rose-colored glasses").

The subconscious aspect of stare detection is definite, variable among subjects, and less understood. A 2013 study showed that blind subjects showed the same activity in the amygdala (threats and arousal) as sighted subjects when handed a photo of a person staring at them. This tells us that the visual cortex is helpful, but not determinative for stare detection. Theories with less-than-solid proof at this point in our understanding suggest inclusion of subconscious input from external sources (e.g., collective consciousness).

It is my belief that the umpire in question has observed the "bad call zoom" repeatedly on television and therefore reacts subconsciously, based on conscious and subconscious inputs, when he or she may have made a bad call. The umpire's ability to focus may prevent the conscious mind from even being aware of the internal conflict showing on his or her face.

You crazy Neurologist you.

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