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Answering the "Hey where was that tag blue'


Umpire942

Question

A coach thinks you missed a call.  We all know 2 man, especially with multiple runners and in far away positions at TOP.  You have to make a call, and you saw him tagged out.  Head first slide, I had him tagged in the shoulder at 3b. (where the base coach who was also right there is mad and asking)

Do we have to answer where it was , especially when its not asked nicely?   

on opposite, on the safes, does it help to say nope "he got his arm to the bag first" out loud ? (pick off)

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1 hour ago, beerguy55 said:

Because a split second before the torque wrench was applied to the faucet handle, it had been calibrated by top members of the state and federal department of weights and measures to be dead-on balls accurate.

It's an industry term

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(1) I agree with the comments on asking to see the ball. It's my job to see the ball. If I'm not sure there's secure possession or the ball might be on the ground hidden by the tangle or a cloud of dust, I'll start moving. The coach (and good players) will know what the deal is, and low and behold, I'll hear a coach yell, "Show him the ball!" Or I'll just wait till I can see it. I'd never ask a player to show me a live ball.

(2) Each game and play is different. But if there's a weird tag play, like on the helmet as the runner slides in feet first, or on the cleats as the runner slides head first, or a tag on the chest on a BR at first, I think it's perfectly ok to either verbalize or touch your head (or the appropriate body part) with a "He got him, on the foot, he's out!"  For me, it can spare me a conversation or make any one that happens much quicker. I also respect anyone who says they'd never do that.

(3) R-1 beats the throw and tag at second, but loses momentary contact with the bag, I know the two players and I might be the only ones in the yard who saw that. I think it's fine to give an "Out!  . . . he's off the bag (motion like we do when F-3 is off the bag), he's out!" I know that's not in any mechanics book, but I honestly did it last week in a very high level game, and OHC never said a word--and he's notoriously wordy 🙂

(4) I look at a double safe mechanic just like a huge bang out on a very close play. Sometimes they're appropriate, and like Thunderheads said, sometimes it just comes out! 🙂 Our job is to communicate our calls, but also (if appropriate) let everyone know what we saw. I've drilled the Basic Six repeatedly for hours many a weekend and weeks. Sometimes the Basic 6 just don't communicate the call we need to make. A big punchout isn't in any accepted Umpire Mechanics book. But we all know what it is, why it's necessary, and when to use it. And I say this, being a guy who actually doesn't like to see excessive signalling mechanics when it's not necessary by base umpires. While less is often more, sometimes more is exactly what the play and call require.

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On 8/1/2021 at 8:04 AM, mark38090 said:

We eat grits at least a couple days a week here. 

Sure but can you tell me the correct ignition timing be on a 1955 Bellaire Chevrolet with a 327 cubic engine and a 4-barrel carburetor?

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On 8/7/2021 at 10:55 PM, Velho said:

Sure but can you tell me the correct ignition timing be on a 1955 Bellaire Chevrolet with a 327 cubic engine and a 4-barrel carburetor?

No, Cause Chevy didn't make a 327 in '55, the 327 didn't come out till '62. And it wasn't offered in the Bel Air with a four-barrel carb till '64. However, in 1964, the correct ignition timing would be four degrees before top-dead-center.

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On 7/29/2021 at 5:36 PM, Recontra said:

A big punchout isn't in any accepted Umpire Mechanics book. But we all know what it is, why it's necessary, and when to use it. And I say this, being a guy who actually doesn't like to see excessive signalling mechanics when it's not necessary by base umpires. While less is often more, sometimes more is exactly what the play and call require.

Not saying you are wrong (because you're not), just want to provide context...

From the 2014 CCA Umpire's Manual:

5.1 Style and Form of Calls

3) Umpires are expected to increase the assertiveness of their call signal and voice as the play becomes closer. A casual, laid-back signal is not appropriate in a crucial, close play. However, over-elaborate, excessive signals are not an acceptable technique either.

~Dawg

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