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Not sure how i have made it though the years, but its really starting to get to me.  I purchased a 200$ thin vest which is supposed to last 4 hours.  How its going to fit under a WV is beyond me, but im giving anything a try.

how to do 9 let alone 9+ on a 90+ day.  + behind the plate.   Are you just asking for health trouble, let alone a miss?

What are the best tips, my problem is upper body and head heat, not really feat/legs

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1 hour ago, Umpire942 said:

 

how to do 9 let alone 9+ on a 90+ day.  + behind the plate.   Are you just asking for health trouble, let alone a miss?

9+games?! What time are you starting and stopping in the morning and evening, and how short are the games. 18 hours of plate in 90+ heat in one day is crazy! 

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14 hours ago, Rock Bottom said:

9+games?! What time are you starting and stopping in the morning and evening, and how short are the games. 18 hours of plate in 90+ heat in one day is crazy! 

innings, so a 9 mens + 7 18u  inning game in 90, both plate, my i kept up with pitches, but had a miss at the plate at catcher INF (possible)

 

regardless is both plate, i do have days and weekends will I will have 18 on a sat and 18 on a sun. (not even talking about after hours during the week)

 

looking for staying cool tips

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9 !  OMG

I tried 3 a couple years ago and did not make it thru the 3rd game in 95+ blazing sun 90% humidity crap. 

I did have a cool blues vest but I gave it to the 3rd game PU as I figured he needed it more.  It lasted for him til the 5th inning and then it was actually warm and he had to shed it.  To be honest he probably would have made it had they not delayed the game when I came out and the extra ump had to suit up and get in the game. 

Looking back I should have just worn it myself. LOL

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I cannot stress enough that hydration begins 24 hours before game time. If your urine isn't clear by game time, you are taking the field in a dehydrated state. Take a quart more of fluid for the day than you think you need to drink during your games and post-game. I had kidney stones 3 years ago that was linked to dehydration. I would've ripped a sink out of the wall or told you where Jimmy Hoffa is buried to make that pain stop and I'd do anything to avoid that ever happening again.

Get a zip lock baggie or small plastic container, put ice and water in that and a small hand towel. In between innings, place the hand towel around your neck or around your wrists. This will cool your blood as it passes those parts of your body which then spreads the cooling effect throughout your body. A few weeks ago, I had a partner who had one of those chamois towels that divers use which he was storing in ice cold water and then put it around his neck and tucked it inside his shirt. Not something I would do in a tournament, talent showcase or playoff game...but, for a random regular season youth travel game on a Saturday afternoon when it's 95 degrees, we do everything we can to stay cool.

Finally, the Catalyst Cryohelmet is the real deal. Designed for post-concussion therapy (a chilled head doesn't swell as much following a head trauma), the Cryohelmet also functions well to help you cool off and recover post game. I don't have one yet myself but, everyone I know that uses one is extremely pleased with it.

~Dawg

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While hydration is important, I can tell you as an endurance athlete Dawg's advice can be misleading.   Hydrating to the point of colorless urine is usually too much.   It can lead in some cases to a more serious issue of hyponatremia.   Lighter shades of yellow are fine. 

 

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Your kidney stones may be a different issue, but when it comes to athletic performance, my doctor (who has a sports medicine subspecialty) along with just about every sports physiology reference says you want pale, but drinking yourself to the point of trying to clear can cause over hydration and in-turn hypernatremia.   Umpires are subject to this because though perhaps not running continuously, they are standing in the hot sun throughout (often without any electrolyte replacement).

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On 6/23/2021 at 9:37 AM, SeeingEyeDog said:

I cannot stress enough that hydration begins 24 hours before game time. If your urine isn't clear by game time, you are taking the field in a dehydrated state. Take a quart more of fluid for the day than you think you need to drink during your games and post-game. I had kidney stones 3 years ago that was linked to dehydration. I would've ripped a sink out of the wall or told you where Jimmy Hoffa is buried to make that pain stop and I'd do anything to avoid that ever happening again.

Get a zip lock baggie or small plastic container, put ice and water in that and a small hand towel. In between innings, place the hand towel around your neck or around your wrists. This will cool your blood as it passes those parts of your body which then spreads the cooling effect throughout your body. A few weeks ago, I had a partner who had one of those chamois towels that divers use which he was storing in ice cold water and then put it around his neck and tucked it inside his shirt. Not something I would do in a tournament, talent showcase or playoff game...but, for a random regular season youth travel game on a Saturday afternoon when it's 95 degrees, we do everything we can to stay cool.

Finally, the Catalyst Cryohelmet is the real deal. Designed for post-concussion therapy (a chilled head doesn't swell as much following a head trauma), the Cryohelmet also functions well to help you cool off and recover post game. I don't have one yet myself but, everyone I know that uses one is extremely pleased with it.

~Dawg

I learned that there are no rules about amateur umpires staying cool once Wendelstedt worked an entire game at Wrigley with a towel around his neck. I was good with it, as was everyone. 

Use those towels, change clothes, go in dugouts between innings, whatever you can do. It’s an amateur baseball game and we’re the only guys who don’t spend half the game in a dugout doing whatever we can to stay cool. 

 

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All I can offer is this: Hydrate well before, during, and after a game. Think about using these: Cooling Towel w/ "Florida Water", FROZEN Cooling Pacts w / vest. The pacts have lasted 3 +/- hrs. in 90+ temps.PS, I wore this gear for testing while working on farm so pants, aren't part of the uniform 🙂

 

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All I can offer is this: Hydrate well before, during, and after a game. Think about using these: Cooling Towel w/ "Florida Water", FROZEN Cooling Pacts w / vest. The pacts have lasted 3 +/- hrs. in 90+ temps. . . . PS, I wore this gear for testing while working on farm so pants, aren't part of the uniform 🙂

 

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On 6/23/2021 at 7:37 AM, SeeingEyeDog said:

I cannot stress enough that hydration begins 24 hours before game time. If your urine isn't clear by game time, you are taking the field in a dehydrated state. Take a quart more of fluid for the day than you think you need to drink during your games and post-game. I had kidney stones 3 years ago that was linked to dehydration. I would've ripped a sink out of the wall or told you where Jimmy Hoffa is buried to make that pain stop and I'd do anything to avoid that ever happening again.

Get a zip lock baggie or small plastic container, put ice and water in that and a small hand towel. In between innings, place the hand towel around your neck or around your wrists. This will cool your blood as it passes those parts of your body which then spreads the cooling effect throughout your body. A few weeks ago, I had a partner who had one of those chamois towels that divers use which he was storing in ice cold water and then put it around his neck and tucked it inside his shirt. Not something I would do in a tournament, talent showcase or playoff game...but, for a random regular season youth travel game on a Saturday afternoon when it's 95 degrees, we do everything we can to stay cool.

Finally, the Catalyst Cryohelmet is the real deal. Designed for post-concussion therapy (a chilled head doesn't swell as much following a head trauma), the Cryohelmet also functions well to help you cool off and recover post game. I don't have one yet myself but, everyone I know that uses one is extremely pleased with it.

~Dawg

Kidney stones were the worst pain I have ever felt.  One of the nurses said she'd rather go through labor pains then go through stones again.

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