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First, let’s look at current NFHS rule 1-5-11: ART. 11 . . . Non-traditional playing equipment must be reviewed by the NFHS Baseball Rules Committee before it will be permitted to be used. A

I would allow it only for F2 to broadcast back to the dugout, and only to remark on how good my zone is. Kidding. No, not legal for FED.

Is it NOCSAE approved?

4 minutes ago, Stan W. said:

and my favorite.....Day game or Night game? 

But aside from just being snide, my question actually has a basis in the rules - we can't allow them to have anything inside their helmet that isn't NOCSAE approved.

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First, let’s look at current NFHS rule 1-5-11:

ART. 11 . . . Non-traditional playing equipment must be reviewed by the NFHS Baseball Rules Committee before it will be permitted to be used.

As far as I can tell the last time the FED ruled on anything technology-related was in 2015 when they approved dugout usage of video monitoring or replay equipment for coaching purposes during games. The rule governing the use of technology aids by the coach is 3-3-1h and is illustrated in related case plays 3.3.1 Situations O and P (also see case plays 3.3.1 OO and PP for video).

Since there appears to be no approval from the NFHS Baseball Rules Committee yet I would say that the use of wireless communication between dugout coach and catcher is not yet legal.

The NCAA has used wireless communication in an experimental trial that started in 2018 and has not yet approved it for general use. Little League specifically makes it illegal for any wireless communication between coach and on-field personnel in its rule 3.17.

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I would allow it only for F2 to broadcast back to the dugout, and only to remark on how good my zone is.

Kidding. No, not legal for FED.

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In the 80s, my Dad traveled to Japan a few times each year. He would always bring back newspaper clippings or souvenirs related to baseball. (I was the first catcher in my LL to have a Mizuno catcher's mitt. Actually, it was the first Mizuno anything in my LL.)

One of his clippings was a story about the development of a Mizuno catcher's mitt which had buttons, wires, batteries and light bulbs which allowed the catcher to signal pitch calls. (I hope they coded it by saying the 2nd light in the sequence was the hot signal or whatever...)

I'm guessing it was a prototype and not ever approved for play, though. Too much risk of injury, for sure...

~Dawg

Found a link and posted it here: 

 

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13 hours ago, Thatsnotyou said:

Fed rules. Is it legal for a catcher to wear a one-way radio and take pitch calls from the dugout?

As the others have said, no, it is not legal. However, be really, really careful about this. Some earpieces that you might suspect are earbuds for a radio transceiver are actually modern, discreet hearing aides... 

Which are legal, and cannot be discriminated against nor barred from use. 

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9 hours ago, MadMax said:

As the others have said, no, it is not legal. However, be really, really careful about this. Some earpieces that you might suspect are earbuds for a radio transceiver are actually modern, discreet hearing aides... 

Which are legal, and cannot be discriminated against nor barred from use. 

I don't know if this is universal, but in my state, any such medical device should have a letter from the state high school association saying that it's legal. And if I saw such a thing and they didn't have the letter (but the logic appeared OK, such as in this case), I would let them play, but inform them I would be filling out a report to the state so they would have to get such a letter or have the game retroactively forfeited.

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9 hours ago, MadMax said:

As the others have said, no, it is not legal. However, be really, really careful about this. Some earpieces that you might suspect are earbuds for a radio transceiver are actually modern, discreet hearing aides... 

Which are legal, and cannot be discriminated against nor barred from use. 

I figured there was a chance it was that, so I asked before making any assumptions. It wasn't a hearing aid. I have a good rapport with this coach, so I talked with him about it between innings. He said it was approved at the conference meeting before the season. I asked if there were any umpire/state admins etc. there, and he didn't believe so. He said they were told they could only use it for a single purpose - catcher receiving pitch calls from the dugout. Can't talk back, can't have it in while he's batting.  

Though I couldn't recall a specific rule prohibiting it, logically I figured there's no way this is legal, or I would have seen this years ago, heard about it in a POE, etc. Just because a rule book doesn't explicitly say you can't do something, it doesn't mean you can. 

Since it was a conference game, the other coach was well aware of it (and was fine with it), and no one said anything else (and the signs were getting in quickly), I let it go. I don't know if it's a "not pick boogers" situation even though I was 99.9% sure this wasn't legal, but I decided to leave well enough alone at that point. Not a hill I needed to die on that afternoon, and it wasn't giving them any sort of unfair advantage (that I could tell).

I think the play from here may be what @kylehutsonmentioned - just inform the state and let them sort it out. 

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7 minutes ago, Thatsnotyou said:

I think the play from here may be what @kylehutsonmentioned - just inform the state and let them sort it out. 

That's where I would go next. And be sure to tell them that the conference approved it: the state association will need to communicate with all of them, plus the assigner/commissioner about their ruling (presumably in the negative).

The conference never considered whether it was illegal by rule—nobody knows the rules, and the probability is approaching zero that this thought even entered any of their heads—they were deliberating about whether it was fair, and whether all the schools (or, possibly, individual coaches or AD's) wanted to invest in these for their team.

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So, how could this be abused? 

Maybe the coach telling his catcher to go talk with the pitcher therefore saving a DC?

Telling the catcher to appeal a  missed base? leaving early?  That is usually done verbally by getting the fielders/catchers attention and telling them what to do.  

Telling the catcher to inform the umpire he sucks?

What else?

If it would eliminate the card holders around the wrists or belt, I could be for this.

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Abuse isn't the main concern. Safety is.

And it might in fact be safe. FED requires that new technology be proven safe before they allow it.

That's an approach the FDA and EPA might consider adopting.

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