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Vegas_Ump

BOO

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No, I'm not talking about Halloween!  :-)  There is a FED BOO discussion above, and I wanted to point out some Little League consequences.  

Using Little League rules (OBR-based).  I had many cases last year when an improper batter came to bat, and the offense realized their error, and they asked for time to bring the proper batter up.  It was granted, and the proper batter came to bat and inherited the count.  All was well......almost.

However, I had cases where the DM wanted outs!  He didn't realize the procedures under the BOO rule.  One guy kept heaping it on and was given an opportunity to earn a one-game suspension for his ejection!  Since it doesn't happen that often, attention is not paid to the rule that much.

The biggest consequences often goes unnoticed!  Where you have mandatory play, each player must complete at least one at-bat.  The definition of an "at bat" states that the batter must come to the plate WITH NO COUNT and be retired or becomes a batter-runner.  So if a proper batter comes to bat to inherit the count of an improper batter, or if a proper batter is called out on a proper BOO appeal, neither case gets credit for a time at bat.  Thus, MPR rules may be a thorn in their sides even if a BOO is dispositioned correctly.  

Mike

Las Vegas

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3 hours ago, Vegas_Ump said:

However, I had cases where the DM wanted outs!  He didn't realize the procedures under the BOO rule.  One guy kept heaping it on and was given an opportunity to earn a one-game suspension for his ejection!  

JFC - I keep hearing about this more and more...if you think the rules are wrong, protest...if you don't want to protest STFU.

Is it appropriate for an ump to direct a coach in this direction to end the discussion?

 

Coach, do you think I have the rule wrong?

Yes

Do you want to protest?

If no then "All right, then that's enough"

If yes then "protest noted, let's play" (or follow whatever process is required)

 

Now I get it, and I've lived it where the protest process is more headache than it's worth, but the bottom line is the coach has an avenue to argue the rule, and it's not on the field.   We can have whatever thoughts we want about a coach and ump "discussing" a judgment call, and how far it should or should not go...there's just very little practical reason for a rules discussion to last more than a couple of sentences...."can you run that by your partner?"  "are we willing to look in the rule book for a few seconds?"  "OK, no worries, then I'd like to protest"   

4 hours ago, Vegas_Ump said:

The biggest consequences often goes unnoticed!  Where you have mandatory play, each player must complete at least one at-bat.  The definition of an "at bat" states that the batter must come to the plate WITH NO COUNT and be retired or becomes a batter-runner.  So if a proper batter comes to bat to inherit the count of an improper batter, or if a proper batter is called out on a proper BOO appeal, neither case gets credit for a time at bat.  Thus, MPR rules may be a thorn in their sides even if a BOO is dispositioned correctly.  

Do you mean the batter must physically come to the plate...because a batter who is called out for MYTAB is charged with an at bat....he's 0 for 1 now...he was retired.

So, if it's ABC and B bats and A comes to the plate...he's then called out for missing his turn before the first pitch...since he was standing at the plate, does this satisfy the MPR?  Or does the fact that it's a statistical at bat alone meet the requirement?  (eg. he was still waiting in the on deck circle)

And, to get real cute, B now comes back to the plate...even though he did bat, and got a hit, all that is erased, so he hasn't met his MPR yet, right?

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From the 2019 Little League Rules Instruction Manual (Regulation IV)

(i)   Mandatory Play: Every rostered player present at the start of a game will participate in each game for a minimum of six (6) defensive outs and bat at least one (1) time. For the purpose of this rule, “six defensive outs” is defined as: A player enters the field in one of the nine defensive positions when his/her team is on defense and occupies such position while six outs are made; “bat at least one (1) time” is defined as: A player enters the batter’s box with no count and completes that time at bat by being put out, called out by an umpire or by reaching base safely.

INSTRUCTOR’S COMMENTS:

➔ This now defines what constitutes the requirements of mandatory play. Under 3.03, a starter does not have to play a defensive position for six “consecutive” defensive outs because he/she has reentry rights but he/she MUST get six defensive outs sometime during the game. A substitute MUST get six “consecutive” defensive outs before he/she is removed from the game.

  To qualify as a time at bat for this rule, the batter MUST complete a time at bat by stepping into the batter’s box with no count and completing the time at bat by being put out; reaching base safely or being called out by an umpire. If a Rule 6.07 violation (Batting Out of Turn) is discovered before a batter has completed his/her time at a bat and the proper batter replaces the improper batter who had a count on him/her, neither player has met the requirements of this rule for mandatory play and both players will have to complete a time at a bat sometime later in the game. If a player/batter is called out by an umpire for using an illegal bat or for Rule 6.07 violation, this will qualify as an at bat for the purpose of this rule.

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20 hours ago, beerguy55 said:

JFC - I keep hearing about this more and more...if you think the rules are wrong, protest...if you don't want to protest STFU.

Is it appropriate for an ump to direct a coach in this direction to end the discussion?

Yes - it's ALWAYS appropriate to tell a coach to STFU.

....... Oh.  Wait.  That's not what you were asking, is it?

In seriousness, I love the idea:  "I've ruled [X].  You protesting that?  No?  Moving on, then."  I had a BOO about a year and a half ago, and I ruled it wrong, as I found out later.  Apparently, though, I was convincing enough in my handling that the coach didn't have an issue - or at least, not even enough of one to even speak to my partner about it.  (In this case, the phrase "better lucky than good" was in play.)

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