Jump to content
  • 0
Sign in to follow this  
Guest Randy

Base running Ruling

Question

Guest Randy

In a Pennsylvania youth girls softball game the bases were loaded with 2 outs.   On the next pitch, the batter swung and missed for strike two.   The runner at 3rd base mistakenly thought it was strike three and started jogging to their home 3rd base dugout.  When she was about 10 feet from the dugout, she realized there were only 2 strikes and sprinted back to 3rd base.  The other team didn’t make a play to tag her as they were a bit confused also.   After she returned to 3rd, the opposing team said she should be called out for running out of the baseline and the ump agreed and called her out, ending the inning.

While she did jog towards the dugout, she never left the field of play.  She never touched her coach or any other player and since the other team never made an attempted play, she didn’t obstruct anything.  I thought the ruling of running out of the baseline in this case was inaccurate.   Can you tell me what the correct call should have been and under what rule?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Incorrect ruling, you can be out of the basepath only when the team is attempting a tag on that runner. A runner may be ruled out for abandoning their effort to run the bases, but it is usually only applied in baseball when the runner enters the dugout or clearly runs across the field thinking they're out. But googling the ASA softball rulebook, they seem to state the runner would have to reach the dugout to be ruled out.

Edit: correct->incorrect

 

 

*

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
19 hours ago, Guest Randy said:

In a Pennsylvania youth girls softball game the bases were loaded with 2 outs.   On the next pitch, the batter swung and missed for strike two.   The runner at 3rd base mistakenly thought it was strike three and started jogging to their home 3rd base dugout.  When she was about 10 feet from the dugout, she realized there were only 2 strikes and sprinted back to 3rd base.  The other team didn’t make a play to tag her as they were a bit confused also.   After she returned to 3rd, the opposing team said she should be called out for running out of the baseline and the ump agreed and called her out, ending the inning.

While she did jog towards the dugout, she never left the field of play.  She never touched her coach or any other player and since the other team never made an attempted play, she didn’t obstruct anything.  I thought the ruling of running out of the baseline in this case was inaccurate.   Can you tell me what the correct call should have been and under what rule?

The runner "could be" out, but not for the reason stated.

Depending on the softball code (or local league specific rules) some rule sets only require the runner to reach the "team area" to have abandoned and be called out - to recognize the possibility of recreational "school yard" and "third world" fields that have no defined dugout beyond a bench (if there is even a bench) that is somewhere (usually) in dead ball territory - or it's simply a statement that each team owns a "zone" that is not limited to DBT...though dead ball territory is usually the safest bet, a strict interpretation of the letter of the rule doesn't require it.

For example - this is from International rules of softball..."The runner is out...When he abandons a base and enters his team area, or leaves the field of play, while the ball is alive" - it clearly distinguishes the team area, and dead ball territory, as two potentially different scenarios - ie. the team area could still be on the field of play.

But no, to the ruling stated on the field, you can only have an "out of the basepath" out if there is an attempt to make a tag.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

First.......I would like to commend you for searching out the correct application of rules.

Second.......I would ask that you take  this to your league director(s), to ensure the umpire(s) is/are educated on this application of the rule moving forward.

Third......I would NOT approach the umpire or the director(s) with "I asked these guys on the internet and...." .   You should find a copy of the rules used in your league and present that.

Fourth......I would suggest that you consider taking an opportunity at umpiring.  You already took the first step by asking.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
22 hours ago, Gfoley4 said:

Correct ruling, you can be out of the basepath only when the team is attempting a tag on that runner. A runner may be ruled out for abandoning their effort to run the bases, but it is usually only applied in baseball when the runner enters the dugout or clearly runs across the field thinking they're out. But googling the ASA softball rulebook, they seem to state the runner would have to reach the dugout to be ruled out.

 

 

GFoley, INCORRECT ruling.  The OP said the umpire called her out.

If the umpire said she was out of the base path, the ump is just as far off base as she was.  (Pun intended.)
 

Depending on how it happened, there could be an argument for a look back rule violation, in which case she would be out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
14 hours ago, The Man in Blue said:

GFoley, INCORRECT ruling.  The OP said the umpire called her out.

If the umpire said she was out of the base path, the ump is just as far off base as she was.  (Pun intended.)
 

Depending on how it happened, there could be an argument for a look back rule violation, in which case she would be out.

 

On July 16, 2020 at 10:23 PM, Gfoley4 said:

Correct ruling "IS", you can be out of the basepath only when the team is attempting a tag on that runner. A runner may be ruled out for abandoning their effort to run the bases, but it is usually only applied in baseball when the runner enters the dugout or clearly runs across the field thinking they're out. But googling the ASA softball rulebook, they seem to state the runner would have to reach the dugout to be ruled out.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 7/17/2020 at 7:16 PM, The Man in Blue said:

Depending on how it happened, there could be an argument for a look back rule violation, in which case she would be out.

Ooooh - I think that would cause an uproar even more than the "team area" argument - I know you're talking a conceptual hypothetical but I worry some overzealous ump would try to to justify it...or some jackass coach to argue it - first you'd need the ball thrown back to the pitcher, in the circle and the pitcher doing nothing as far as the runner is concerned...at which point the runner is allowed to stop (once) and (immediately) return to the base - unless the runner stops, stares at the pitcher for a couple of seconds, does some kind of false start, (and even then I'd want to know the runner just isn't plain confused) calling the look back in this scenario would be a really really strict interpretation of the rules - the rule isn't meant to punish a base runner's confusion, it's meant to curb bush league time wasting...

Calling this out is (almost always) a bad look (even if it can be justified in a court of law, or in a debate competition), and the coach is a horse's ass for arguing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...