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Guest RSH

Returning pitcher in a game for major league

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Guest RSH

Can a major league pitcher starting a game as pitcher go back in to the pitcher spot after moving to a different position on the field?

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Yes. Joe Maddon did it more than once with the Cubs recently. For example:
https://www.mlb.com/cut4/three-cubs-pitchers-play-left-field-in-cubs-15-inning-win-over-the-reds-c1868355

Moving the pitcher to another position prevents his team from using the designated hitter the rest of the game. See rule 5.11(a)(8):
"Once the game pitcher is switched from the mound to a position on defense, such move shall terminate the Designated Hitter role for that Club for the remainder of the game."

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On 7/15/2020 at 5:58 AM, Guest RSH said:

Can a major league pitcher starting a game as pitcher go back in to the pitcher spot after moving to a different position on the field?

Yes, as long as he hasn’t been completely pulled from the game. Although in DH leagues, as soon as the pitcher takes a different position or a batter takes the mound, that team forfeits use of the DH for the rest of the game.

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My question is, if a closer came in, blew the save, switched positions, and then took the mound again in the next inning after his team regains the lead, can he still get a save? And if so, would he have a blown save and a converted save in the same game?

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On 7/30/2020 at 12:15 PM, spark2212 said:

My question is, if a closer came in, blew the save, switched positions, and then took the mound again in the next inning after his team regains the lead, can he still get a save? And if so, would he have a blown save and a converted save in the same game?

As long as he satisfies this definition, I don't see why not.   The interesting part of the rule it is about when he "enters the game" - this would mean, strictly interpreted, a player who plays all game at CF and pitches the final inning to "save" the win can't be credited with a save.  Unless you interpret it to mean "starts pitching".

The interesting question would be, if this is true, then if he allowed the other team to tie it up again, would he be charged with two blown saves in the same game?   Again - I don't see why not (you could have multiple pitchers charged with blown saves in a game, so it follows that one pitcher could have multiple blown saves).

In the end, as long as there is no more than one win, and one save credited (and can't be to the same pitcher), there can be any number of blown saves.

The official scorer shall credit a pitcher with a save when such pitcher meets all four of the following conditions:

(a) He is the finishing pitcher in a game won by his team;

(b) He is not the winning pitcher;

(c) He is credited with at least 1 ⁄3 of an inning pitched; and

(d) He satisfies one of the following conditions:

(1) He enters the game with a lead of no more than three runs and pitches for at least one inning;

(2) He enters the game, regardless of the count, with the potential tying run either on base, or at bat or on deck (that is, the potential tying run is either already on base or is one of the first two batters he faces); or

(3) He pitches for at least three innings.
 

On a side note - my favorite part of the "save" stat...and one of the many reasons I think it deserves virtually zero weight in measuring a pitcher's quality, is if your team is winning 28-0, if your starting pitcher throws six innings, and your second pitcher throws the next three innings to close out the game, he gets the save - as long as his team still wins and the lead never changes hand.

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From the Wikipedia entry for Save (baseball) (emphasis added)—

A blown save (abbreviated BSV, BS or B) is charged to a pitcher who enters a game in a situation which permits him to earn a save (a save situation or save opportunity), but who instead allows the tying run to score. Note that if the tying run was scored by a runner who was already on base when the new pitcher entered the game, that new pitcher will be charged with a blown save even though the run will not be charged to the new pitcher, but rather to the pitcher who allowed that runner to reach base. If the reliever allows the tying or leading run, but the reliever's team wins the game, the reliever wins the game. Due to this definition, a pitcher cannot blow multiple saves in a game unless he has multiple save opportunities, a situation only possible when a pitcher temporarily switches defensive positions. The blown save was introduced by the Rolaids Relief Man Award in 1988. A pitcher who enters the game in a save situation and does not finish the game—but his team still leading—is not charged with a save opportunity. Save percentage is the ratio of saves to save opportunities.

On August 22, 2007, Wes Littleton earned a save with the largest winning margin ever, pitching the last three innings of a 30–3 Texas Rangers win over the Baltimore Orioles. Littleton entered the game with a 14–3 lead, and the final 27-run differential broke the previous record for a save by eight runs. The New York Times noted that "there are the preposterous saves, of which Littleton's now stands out as No. 1."

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