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SeeingEyeDog

Vision Testing (probable move to bi-focals)

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Greetings brethren,

     As part of my pre-season prep, I am having my eyes examined next week. I have always worn glasses to see better far away from me. However, for the last few months, I have had to start removing my glasses for reading and to see things up close. I suspect I will be receiving a prescription for bifocals.

     For those of you out there who wear glasses, can you please talk about your experiences with this change in vision as you lose your ability to see clearly closely? Was it a difficult process relative to our craft? What might I expect? Do you wear your bifocals behind the plate, on the bases? Never? Again, just curious what others' experiences were/are...what has worked? Not worked? And what to do and not do.

~S.E.D.

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I wear my distance glasses behind the plate and multi-focals (progressives...advanced bifocals) on the bases. I find that when I wear the progressives behind the plate I get more "feedback" that is negative. I just orderedOakley's that are distance only for both positions. With the progressives you have to move your head to get the best view. 

I can read without my glasses (at least in daytime). so I will just look below my glasses to do the paperwork.

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I am right eye dominant and have been toying with the idea of progressive in the left and a regular corrective lens in the right.  I have heard this works for some folks.

To note all year last season( my 1st behind the plate)  my main complaint was I was calling strikes too low.  After doing some checking on the zone I admittedly was.  I was calling bottom of the knee which LL is top of the knee.  fall ball was much better . To note all the complaints saying I was calling too low did admit I was very consistent in doing it. Usually they stopped complaining at that point.

So all that said I did not seem to feel my transitions "got in my way".

So anywho just tossing out an idea I here works for other people in different sports.

 

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5 hours ago, ArchAngel72 said:

So all that said I did not seem to feel my transitions "got in my way".

Keep in mind "transitions" are lenses that get dark in the sunlight, then lighten up indoors. "progressive" are lenses that let you focus at any distance from far to near. Two different animals often confusing for consumers. If you go to an optician and tell them you want transitions, you may not be getting the progressive you thought you ordered. You can get progressive transitions..but I degress... 

22 hours ago, SeeingEyeDog said:

For those of you out there who wear glasses, can you please talk about your experiences with this change in vision as you lose your ability to see clearly closely? Was it a difficult process relative to our craft? What might I expect? Do you wear your bifocals behind the plate, on the bases? Never? Again, just curious what others' experiences were/are...what has worked? Not worked? And what to do and not do.

 Bifocals have 2 focal points..One distance and one for reading. Bifocals create what is known as "image jump". When you look through the top at an object, and then move your eye to the reading area, the object will "jump" due to the change in the power of the lens.  With progressives, this is eliminated. It's a smooth change of power from distance down to the reading , thus eliminating the image jump, and giving you clearer vision from distance right through to near vision.   I have never worn a bifocal myself, but I would imagine it would be terribly difficult to track correctly with that segment line right below your line of sight. 

As far as doing the plate in progressive lenses...I don't have a problem. There's a corridor in a progressive lens. As your eye travels down the lens, you clear vision is nearer to you. The top has your distance Rx, the middle of the lens will let you see clear at 18-24", the bottom has the "full" reading power and allows you to see close up stuff. I have learned to angle my gig line in the slot, so with a RHB, my head, shoulders, torso are actually angled slightly towards F4, (or F6 with a LHB). When I'm looking straight ahead, I'm looking at home plate and F2's mitt. I then raise my eyes to see F1. I can then track all the way, with my head not moving and perfectly straight, looking through the center of my glasses when the ball reaches the zone.

It took a lot of practice, and I still move my head a little too much at times. As @Kevin_K will attest to.   

If you can read a lineup card without the glasses, you may want to try distance glasses for plate work, as @LMSANS does. For me, that's not an option any more. I can't see close with distance glasses on, and I can't see close even if I lift up the glasses and look close with no Rx. (I can thank my astigmatism for that).

It's a trial and error thing, but I'd give the progressives a shot behind the plate. Just try the angle...head straight directed at the zone, then raise the eyes to F1 and track with head still, eyes moving down the lens from top to middle as you track the incoming pitch.   

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5 hours ago, ArchAngel72 said:

I am right eye dominant and have been toying with the idea of progressive in the left and a regular corrective lens in the right.

My professional opinion is stay away from such an endeavor. You may learn to use the more dominant eye and suppress the sight of the "progressive eye" , but that will play games with your stereoscopic vision and hinder you depth perception.   I would not recommend it. 

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I would embrace any advice @Richvee has for corrective eyeware with his decades in the business as solid information.

And as far as his mechanics go, I would suggest that it his approach to umpiring that has lifted him from only rec ball and subvarsity assignments to a schedule of varsity and JUCO ball that most members of this board would be envious of.

As much as I rib him about being a bobble head, his umpiring is solid. 

As he reads this, he's probably thinks "What the hell has happened to the perpetual wiseass Kevin_K?" but I have to give him his due. He was the first guy I reached out to when I was working on my NJSIAA test that opened with this question:

The NFHS approved signal for indicating that an umpire has some relevant information for his/her left chest (heart).
A. Correct                   
B.Incorrect
 

He walked me off the ledge.

Thanks Rich!

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12 hours ago, Kevin_K said:

The NFHS approved signal for indicating that an umpire has some relevant information for his/her left chest (heart).
A. Correct                   
B.Incorrect

Thanks for the kind words Kev.  The best part of this question is, it's #1 on the test. Twice I opened the test, read this, and closed it. :bang:

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Whatever lenses you get, have them use chain link fencing for the frames.  It never fails all the fans.

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Ah!  The Eyes have it!

All my life I have had incredible vision.  I was a Phantom pilot for the Air Force, and I could spot bogies way far further out than my squadron mates could.  As I got older, I did need to get some "cheaters" to read or do the computer screen, but the eyes were still terrific.....or so I thought.

Turns out I was very right eye dominant.  That one always checked out 20/10 or no worse than 20/15!  The left eye still checked out at 20/20, but there were some demons living inside my eyeballs.  I had cataracts developing.  It was in my best interests to get them fixed.  My night vision was seemingly OK, but I could not read street signs!  Despite all the lights here in Las Vegas, it was a little bit disconcerting.  In 2017, I had the cataracts fixed.  The left side was actually pretty nasty, and the surgeon had to get rough!

Then I found out how messed up my left eye was.  Yes, the right eye was way over compensating, but then I noticed some scary manifestations.  When I did the eye chart, the left eye could not resolve anything.  It seems there was a little blur (that I though a corrective lens could fix), but the letters looked smudged.  It looked like I was peering through a piece of waxed paper with holes in it.  So I could see parts of the letters, but there was a smear across most of the letters, and I could not read them.

I started taking drops to smooth out the macula (the focal plane where your image forms).  That was getting better, and with some good science by my eye techs, they said said I was sampling at 20/30 (not bad for an old f*art), but there was still some blur and smear.  Then I started another manifestation.  I was diagnosed with macular pucker which causes straight lines to bow out to the right.  I would see the number "3", and the the top would go flat and stretch to the right, and the little nose on the numeral would disappear.  It started to look like a squished "5".  The lines on the side of the road would suddenly have a bulge to the right.  Watching ESPN, I could see the show OK but those little scrolls with the scores and news down below were smudged and constantly in motion!  Few things scare me, but that was one of them!

The good news is that I think some of this is clearing up!  My night vision is outstanding!  That's a good thing to have in Las Vegas!  I am still right eye dominant, but sometimes it seems the left eye is trying to sync up, and with its defects, it gets a little screwy.  Again, some of that has mollified.

Today, I can see a measurable improvement, but it does take time.  I am hoping that I can see and track pitches well enough to do baseball this year.  We start in about 3 weeks, and I'll have another eye exam by then.  But doing spreadsheets and other small-font computer stuff was an adventure for a while.  

By the way, does anyone have one of those flipping coins "SAFE!" or "OUT!";  "Ball!" or "STRIKE"?  :-)

I'll keep you posted.  I am not emotionally ready to step away from the game just yet, but I have to know that I may have to hang it up if my zone sucks.

Cheers!

Mike

Las Vegas

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Have you tried contacts? Even if you have progressive lenses to work at a computer/read/etc., just 'regular" non-progressive contacts prescribed for reading the eye chart at the distance will cover everything clearly up to about an arms' length away, say 2-3 feet. And the last three feet would also be compensated, just not "perfectly" where you could read the rule book in low light for instance, but you could certainly read your indicator in low light, write on a lineup card, or track a baseball. This would cover the distances you need for baseball. You could even play and hit/catch with non-progressives. The other advantage is the contact moves with the eye, unlike the glasses, so tracking a baseball is better with contacts, theoretically.

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