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@HokieUmp

Please note that I am Canadian, so some of the lingo up here might be different. However, if I can, I'll try give a US equivalent.

There are only 3 reasons an adult umpire should be doing U11:

  1. you are umpiring a Provincial/State/District championship, zone or playdown
  2. you are mentoring a younger umpire to support their development
  3. the Assigner is REALLY, REALLY, REALLY stuck and even checked the graveyard before calling you

As for U9s, unless you are mentoring/supervising from the side, are you kidding me?

The younger umpires (12-14 year olds) should be doing those games. Those levels are great to practice and develop their machanics and positioning with the goal of both enjoying umpiring and developing as umpires. Its their place to grow as and enjoy being an umpire.

One of the things I have found is that when we as senior umpires mentor and supoort those younger umpires during games, on the field or from the fence, you get better retention and growth in their ability. More important, coaches and parents treat the little guys and gals umpiring those games differently when they see you in the stands and walking around the park. They are less likely to try to intimidate the our younger members of the umpire community when there is an adult umpire around and monitoring their hijinks.

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1 hour ago, BCBrad said:

@HokieUmp

Please note that I am Canadian, so some of the lingo up here might be different. However, if I can, I'll try give a US equivalent.

There are only 3 reasons an adult umpire should be doing U11:

  1. you are umpiring a Provincial/State/District championship, zone or playdown
  2. you are mentoring a younger umpire to support their development
  3. the Assigner is REALLY, REALLY, REALLY stuck and even checked the graveyard before calling you

As for U9s, unless you are mentoring/supervising from the side, are you kidding me?

The younger umpires (12-14 year olds) should be doing those games. Those levels are great to practice and develop their machanics and positioning with the goal of both enjoying umpiring and developing as umpires. Its their place to grow as and enjoy being an umpire.

One of the things I have found is that when we as senior umpires mentor and supoort those younger umpires during games, on the field or from the fence, you get better retention and growth in their ability. More important, coaches and parents treat the little guys and gals umpiring those games differently when they see you in the stands and walking around the park. They are less likely to try to intimidate the our younger members of the umpire community when there is an adult umpire around and monitoring their hijinks.

Believe me, I don't disagree with principles.  But let me tell you the reality - or rather, the reality as I've seen it from two states now.

There are NO "younger umpires."  Not in the high school chapters, not in the rec leagues.  I heard a statistic - no idea of its veracity - that said the average age of an umpire runs about 55 years old.  I'm 8 months from that number myself.  When I look around, the "young folk" seem to dudes who are in their 40s;  I suck at guessing ages, so there may be a lot of guys in they're 30s, but my point is:  these young teen umpires to which you refer, lined up in a parade, could all ride on the backs of unicorns, since both groups have similar commonality.

If I wanted little-dude work, I'd have more than I could stand, more than likely.  My choice not to is for me and keeping MY game at its best, not to help bring along younger umpires.  I would, but as I said, they just aren't around.  I would love for it to be otherwise.

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4 hours ago, HokieUmp said:

Believe me, I don't disagree with principles.  But let me tell you the reality - or rather, the reality as I've seen it from two states now.

There are NO "younger umpires."  Not in the high school chapters, not in the rec leagues.  I heard a statistic - no idea of its veracity - that said the average age of an umpire runs about 55 years old.  I'm 8 months from that number myself.  When I look around, the "young folk" seem to dudes who are in their 40s;  I suck at guessing ages, so there may be a lot of guys in they're 30s, but my point is:  these young teen umpires to which you refer, lined up in a parade, could all ride on the backs of unicorns, since both groups have similar commonality.

If I wanted little-dude work, I'd have more than I could stand, more than likely.  My choice not to is for me and keeping MY game at its best, not to help bring along younger umpires.  I would, but as I said, they just aren't around.  I would love for it to be otherwise.

Out of curiosity, how about any younger umpires for ASA or USSA or High School Girls slow pitch softball, not baseball in any areas. Non concussion umpiring.

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2 hours ago, dumbdumb said:

Out of curiosity, how about any younger umpires for ASA or USSA or High School Girls slow pitch softball, not baseball in any areas. Non concussion umpiring.

 

Not personal DD ... :cheers: ... BUT ...


You earned your name with that one.  :shakehead:  Was there a question in there or just that off-base comment?

 

Honestly, in my experience most young guys getting started want to get started in baseball.  They are more familiar with it and more comfortable with it.  Likewise, most young gals getting started want softball because they are familiar with it.  Not all, but most.

As umpires get older/more comfortable, they get more adventurous and test the waters on the other side.  Guys move into softball and gals move into baseball.  

Some older guys move to softball because the field is smaller (ironically, the game moves much faster).  Some move over because of the $$ (faster games = more games).

In person, have seen more and worse injuries to softball umpires than baseball umpires.  Less reaction time. Contrary to the name, the ball isn’t soft.  :tongue:

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6 hours ago, The Man in Blue said:

 

Not personal DD ... :cheers: ... BUT ...


You earned your name with that one.  :shakehead:  Was there a question in there or just that off-base comment?

 

Honestly, in my experience most young guys getting started want to get started in baseball.  They are more familiar with it and more comfortable with it.  Likewise, most young gals getting started want softball because they are familiar with it.  Not all, but most.

As umpires get older/more comfortable, they get more adventurous and test the waters on the other side.  Guys move into softball and gals move into baseball.  

Some older guys move to softball because the field is smaller (ironically, the game moves much faster).  Some move over because of the $$ (faster games = more games).

In person, have seen more and worse injuries to softball umpires than baseball umpires.  Less reaction time. Contrary to the name, the ball isn’t soft.  :tongue:

All right jeopardy man.

I noticed the statement that there were no younger umpires. So, I just wanted to find out if younger umpires were possibly going into the slow pitch side of softball, rather than going into baseball, or fast pitch softball, that is if, he had slow pitch softball in his area. Is slow pitch having the problem of getting younger umpires also.

I went to slow pitch because of less money as a barrier to entry with equipment, and less possibility of a concussion on the injury side of the equation.

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Ok, my turn to be sarcastic towards the game  ... nobody wants to do slow pitch.  
 

Although you do make a very good point about the cost barrier to entry.  :cheers:

 

I had a long conversation with a local UIC last night and we talked about “younger” umpires.  In the last four years of summer softball (USA, USSSA), we could only name four “under 30” new umpires that we had seen at the complex.  Two of those were my kids.  One is still doing it (my son in college).  He started with baseball and prefers baseball, but has more opportunity to make money with softball.

In NFHS, even fewer.

All other “young” umpires have typically been 30-40, and there haven’t been many of them either.  I would easily guess the average age of umpires that I work with to be over 50 (maybe even 55).  Many of the guys in the area are well into the 60s and even 70s.  That is true for both baseball and softball.

I need to take a look at our state roster over the weekend.  I’ll try to put together some actual statistics (though those won’t give age, they will give the number of years the person has been licensed).

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