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6 hours ago, umpstu said:

Advice from me is to work as many plate games as possible.

Are you saying this as general advice, or Arch? Either way, I'm interested in knowing why you say that. Personally, I feel a balance is a good thing, ESPECIALLY if you're working youth ball where you're working a minimum of two games at a time.

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I'm not @umpstu, but getting good at the plate takes a lot more time than getting good at the bases.

For anything double-header, work one of each. I'd suggest working the plate for the first game of the night. You're focused, you're well-hydrated, and you're not worn out yet. Sometimes the earlier games are lower-level, too, so the pressure is a little less.

For solo matches, I'd suggest 2/3 of your games to be behind the plate - maybe even 3/4 early on. You'll probably get this when you work with veterans anyway, but make it an effort to work them.

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Having been doing this for 3 years now and basically done the plate for a season and then some.

 

I would recommend to anyone starting out  try the bases 1st 

I think it will give you more time to learn the rules and etc. and learning positioning on the field.  Calling catches outs, safes etc..  Its to me more relaxed than being behind the plate.  

I know no one will be stuffed behind the plate without some instruction and also someone on the field to help out.  But to me learning the bases and then the plate was easier on me I think. 

Plus it got me used to watching the plate umpire when I could to see what he was doing and why.  not always mind you I was busy on the bases but when I could watch I would.

Anyway I also would suggest a class after you have done some work on the field or behind the plate.  

Something I figured out too.  It was far easier for me to find games to do volunteering to do bases for another PU  than it was to find plates to do ( as a less exp PU you get scheduled less, least that's how I feel, I could be wrong)  of course this being my 3rd year but 1st behind the plate, I was given a LOT of games this year.   A Lot I must have done 70 games at least I gotta get better at tracking them.  league games then league tourney games in 2 towns and then district 1 playoffs and district 1 finals and then I got 2 games in the state finals this year ( 3b and LF eh it wasn't the most prestigious spots but I was happy to be there) 

anyway. thats my take on my life as a young  ump..

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2 hours ago, ArchAngel72 said:

Having been doing this for 3 years now and basically done the plate for a season and then some.

 

I would recommend to anyone starting out  try the bases 1st 

I think it will give you more time to learn the rules and etc. and learning positioning on the field.  Calling catches outs, safes etc..  Its to me more relaxed than being behind the plate.  

I know no one will be stuffed behind the plate without some instruction and also someone on the field to help out.  But to me learning the bases and then the plate was easier on me I think. 

Plus it got me used to watching the plate umpire when I could to see what he was doing and why.  not always mind you I was busy on the bases but when I could watch I would.

Anyway I also would suggest a class after you have done some work on the field or behind the plate.  

Something I figured out too.  It was far easier for me to find games to do volunteering to do bases for another PU  than it was to find plates to do ( as a less exp PU you get scheduled less, least that's how I feel, I could be wrong)  of course this being my 3rd year but 1st behind the plate, I was given a LOT of games this year.   A Lot I must have done 70 games at least I gotta get better at tracking them.  league games then league tourney games in 2 towns and then district 1 playoffs and district 1 finals and then I got 2 games in the state finals this year ( 3b and LF eh it wasn't the most prestigious spots but I was happy to be there) 

anyway. thats my take on my life as a young  ump..

Maybe it's just a personal thing.  Since you learned the bases and then the plate, that's all you know.  You will make a name faster by working the plate.   And a great thing about the plate is you don't fall asleep.  There is something happening every pitch that requires your attention.  If I'm working a DH I'm on the plate for the first game.

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17 hours ago, Richvee said:

They do come in bunches, don’t they?  I had a relatively impact free season, until Sunday.  HS sophomore showcase. Pitchers not familiar with catchers, kids throwing low 80’s, all added up to 2 to the mask, 2 off the shin, one direct off the knee, 2 off the foot, and one to the gut. All in 9 innings. :smachhead:

Last night had a pain free game until the bottom of eighth and then took an 84 mph untouched into my right bicep.  HS varsity fall ball so kids might not be too familiar with each other yet but I did not hesitate to let them know to get their act together.  And then took a foul ball directly to the mask in the top of the 9th.  Yikes.  Go Cardinals.

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It still boggles my mind that you can do two years before you get behind the plate, but more so that anybody would let you do that.  You must have umpires growing on trees there!

I know that new umpires are always hesitant to get behind the plate (and sometimes they don’t have all their gear yet), but I gently push them to do it.  You can’t hide out on the bases forever.  Get over the fear and do it.  (Personally, I prefer the plate.)

That said, I agree with @Biscuit that a good mix is best, especially when you are starting out.  Early on I found myself doing so many plates that my base work was starting to suffer.

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In my first years, I almost had no choice but to work the plate. Maybe I just worked with a bunch of plate dodgers.

Then, I learned the magic of payback. I'd gladly work the spring plates. That way, when summer rolled around, I could say "I worked the plate the last time we worked together; can you work the plate tomorrow?"

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19 minutes ago, yawetag said:

In my first years, I almost had no choice but to work the plate. Maybe I just worked with a bunch of plate dodgers.

Then, I learned the magic of payback. I'd gladly work the spring plates. That way, when summer rolled around, I could say "I worked the plate the last time we worked together; can you work the plate tomorrow?"

 

30 minutes ago, The Man in Blue said:

It still boggles my mind that you can do two years before you get behind the plate, but more so that anybody would let you do that.  You must have umpires growing on trees there!

I know that new umpires are always hesitant to get behind the plate (and sometimes they don’t have all their gear yet), but I gently push them to do it.  You can’t hide out on the bases forever.  Get over the fear and do it.  (Personally, I prefer the plate.)

That said, I agree with @Biscuit that a good mix is best, especially when you are starting out.  Early on I found myself doing so many plates that my base work was starting to suffer.

 

It was my choice and lack of gear and training that I stayed out on the bases.  I did not want to step behind the plate with out some schooling at it.

 

20 minutes ago, yawetag said:

In my first years, I almost had no choice but to work the plate. Maybe I just worked with a bunch of plate dodgers.

Then, I learned the magic of payback. I'd gladly work the spring plates. That way, when summer rolled around, I could say "I worked the plate the last time we worked together; can you work the plate tomorrow?"

 

I don't dodge plates at all anymore I take them anytime I can, But I will also jump on bases any time I can too.  I dont mind either.  well OK I do not want to be the rabbit to be running the outfield.. but thats about it LOL

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