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Mr_Blue

High School 2 Man Crew. Plate umpire appealed to me for a check swing call when I was in C. Ever happened to you?

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Felt like I had to make an account to ask about this situation. Have you ever been asked "Did he go?" while you were standing behind the pitcher? Happened to me.

 

0-2 count. Batter appeared to obviously offer at a close pitch, his hands looked well in front of the plate and bat also looked like it had went around with his wrists breaking enough that I could say I'm 100 percent sure it was a swing. I'm sure everyone watching the game knew it was a swing, including everyone in the stands and definitely the 3rd base coach who was ejected for arguing after what happened. It looked like one of those calls that are pretty easy to make from where I was standing.

 

Anyways, I'm waiting on the PU to make the call and he hesitates then points at me and asks if he went. I was so shocked that he was asking me for help on this one that I made a mistake here. I should have just made the call but I looked back at him and just said "It's your call." Now I guess everyone thinks that neither one of us know even though it looked like a pretty obvious call. Now the dugouts are starting to chirp a bit so I call time and we talk for a minute. I tell him what I saw and that it was definitely a swing. I wouldn't call it a swing if it was close but this one wasn't close. We call the kid out. One of the coaches comes to argue, even though I'm sure he had to know we got the call right he wasn't happy with how we made it. He keeps arguing and is warned not to continue and he goes to the dugout. He stops for maybe 10 seconds but is tossed for something he says when he gets to the dugout. Game went okay after that. Then the PU punched out the next batter on the first pitch because I guess he forgot the count wasn't 0-2 anymore. So that didn't help us look any better.

 

Overall the game went okay after that. We handled the coach okay. Ejection went probably as well as it could have. After the game the PU wanted to switch crews so I worked with a different guy. Then he texted me after the game "Thanks for screwing me today ***hole I pray I never work with you again. This is high school varsity ball not the little bull**** you usually do." Which I thought was a little ridiculous, but oh well. I can't help but feel bad for being caught off guard on that play.

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33 minutes ago, Mr_Blue said:

 Have you ever been asked "Did he go?" while you were standing behind the pitcher? Happened to me.'

All the time.  Wouldn't it have been simpler if you gave him what you saw the first time he asked?

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2 minutes ago, johnpatrick said:

All the time.  Wouldn't it have been simpler if you gave him what you saw the first time he asked?

I say in the post that yes that's what SHOULD have happened. But that didn't happen. I was too surprised that he asked for help on that one. It was a swing but still close enough that I feel like it would have been an argument either way.

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15 minutes ago, Mr_Blue said:

I say in the post that yes that's what SHOULD have happened. But that didn't happen. I was too surprised that he asked for help on that one. It was a swing but still close enough that I feel like it would have been an argument either way.

Hmm, I'm not really sure what to make of this. The original post quite clearly makes it sound like a no-brainer, obvious, even Helen Keller could see kind of call. You did say that everyone in the park knew it was a swing. If it was really that obvious, they may not like the process but they should know it ended up right. But now you say it was close enough to be an argument either way - a totally different context that, yea I could see blowing up into a poopstorm with how it went down.

So let's break it down. You know you made a mistake - that's good. Everyone does, some bigger than others. Who ejected the coach, though? Did you tell the coach that "yes, I was late, but I saw a swing"? Did you take the heat and the coach just wouldn't let it go? Or did you let your partner take the brunt of it after you - admittedly - cut his legs out like that? If the latter, well....you compounded your error greatly. I gotta admit, I would have been furious as well. 

At this point, the best and really only thing that can be done is to learn from this and never, NEVER bounce this call back to your partner no matter where you are. There are some old-timers that will still never ask if their partner is in B/C, but not many. And I would recommend contacting your former partner and offering profuse and unqualified apologies. No excuses, no "yea buts...", etc.

Also, were you filling in? I mean no offense, but I'm just surprised someone would get to HS varsity and never have had a check swing appeal when in B/C.

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27 minutes ago, scrounge said:

Hmm, I'm not really sure what to make of this. The original post quite clearly makes it sound like a no-brainer, obvious, even Helen Keller could see kind of call. You did say that everyone in the park knew it was a swing. If it was really that obvious, they may not like the process but they should know it ended up right. But now you say it was close enough to be an argument either way - a totally different context that, yea I could see blowing up into a poopstorm with how it went down.

I'm pretty confident everyone at the game besides the PU knew it was a swing. He missed it and it happens. Especially with how hot it was. Sweat gets in your eye sometimes, the sun might have been a problem, anything could have happened. I know that it was a swing but what I was trying to say is I still feel like the coach would have argued saying "How can you tell if it's a swing if you're behind the pitcher?" I know I should have called it. It would have probably been just a simple explanation and then everyone stays in the game.

The coach went out towards the PU by the plate to argue. I went up to the plate right as the coach did thinking I was gonna get an earful because I had kind of asked for it, but he didn't stay long enough to lay into both of us and he went back to the dugout after being warned by the PU. He did a good job handling him. We set up for the next pitch with me being in A. Then he was tossed for something that he said that the PU heard.

No, not filling in. I'm still young and I've only been doing this for 7 years. Just registered with the state for HS ball last year for the first time. I'm sure you're surprised but in all my years of playing and watching baseball from little league through HS and up until now I honestly haven't seen a PU appeal to a guy in B or C which is why I was so confused because I haven't seen it happen "all the time". And yes definitely learned something from it. Never making that mistake again. I would have apologized to him in person but I had a message to call my other half asap because she wasn't feeling well and went into the emergency room so I was on the phone with her. There was just too much going on this morning.

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1 hour ago, Mr_Blue said:

Felt like I had to make an account to ask about this situation. Have you ever been asked "Did he go?" while you were standing behind the pitcher? Happened to me.

 

0-2 count. Batter appeared to obviously offer at a close pitch, his hands looked well in front of the plate and bat also looked like it had went around with his wrists breaking enough that I could say I'm 100 percent sure it was a swing. I'm sure everyone watching the game knew it was a swing, including everyone in the stands and definitely the 3rd base coach who was ejected for arguing after what happened. It looked like one of those calls that are pretty easy to make from where I was standing.

 

Anyways, I'm waiting on the PU to make the call and he hesitates then points at me and asks if he went. I was so shocked that he was asking me for help on this one that I made a mistake here. I should have just made the call but I looked back at him and just said "It's your call." Now I guess everyone thinks that neither one of us know even though it looked like a pretty obvious call. Now the dugouts are starting to chirp a bit so I call time and we talk for a minute. I tell him what I saw and that it was definitely a swing. I wouldn't call it a swing if it was close but this one wasn't close. We call the kid out. One of the coaches comes to argue, even though I'm sure he had to know we got the call right he wasn't happy with how we made it. He keeps arguing and is warned not to continue and he goes to the dugout. He stops for maybe 10 seconds but is tossed for something he says when he gets to the dugout. Game went okay after that. Then the PU punched out the next batter on the first pitch because I guess he forgot the count wasn't 0-2 anymore. So that didn't help us look any better.

 

Overall the game went okay after that. We handled the coach okay. Ejection went probably as well as it could have. After the game the PU wanted to switch crews so I worked with a different guy. Then he texted me after the game "Thanks for screwing me today ***hole I pray I never work with you again. This is high school varsity ball not the little bull**** you usually do." Which I thought was a little ridiculous, but oh well. I can't help but feel bad for being caught off guard on that play.

Sometimes a plate umpire just misses a swing no matter how obvious.  That's why they go to their partner for help.  Catcher might have blocked the view or whatever.   That's neither here nor there.  Doesn't matter if you're shocked, give what you saw.  And by saying that you were shocked it seems to me that you are coming on here looking to hear somebody tell you that you did the right thing.  Well, you didn't even come close to doing the right thing.  

And I also agree with your partners texts.

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5 minutes ago, Mr_Blue said:

I'm pretty confident everyone at the game besides the PU knew it was a swing. He missed it and it happens. Especially with how hot it was. Sweat gets in your eye sometimes, the sun might have been a problem, anything could have happened. I know that it was a swing but what I was trying to say is I still feel like the coach would have argued saying "How can you tell if it's a swing if you're behind the pitcher?" I know I should have called it. It would have probably been just a simple explanation and then everyone stays in the game.

The coach went out towards the PU by the plate to argue. I went up to the plate right as the coach did thinking I was gonna get an earful because I had kind of asked for it, but he didn't stay long enough to lay into both of us and he went back to the dugout after being warned by the PU. He did a good job handling him. We set up for the next pitch with me being in A. Then he was tossed for something that he said that the PU heard.

No, not filling in. I'm still young and I've only been doing this for 7 years. Just registered with the state for HS ball last year for the first time. I'm sure you're surprised but in all my years of playing and watching baseball from little league through HS and up until now I honestly haven't seen a PU appeal to a guy in B or C which is why I was so confused because I haven't seen it happen "all the time". And yes definitely learned something from it. Never making that mistake again. I would have apologized to him in person but I had a message to call my other half asap because she wasn't feeling well and went into the emergency room so I was on the phone with her. There was just too much going on this morning.

I'm confused as to why you were in the C slot and then, after a check swing appeal, you went to the A slot?  What was the reason for being on the C slot in the first place?  

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3 minutes ago, umpstu said:

Sometimes a plate umpire just misses a swing no matter how obvious.  That's why they go to their partner for help.  Catcher might have blocked the view or whatever.   That's neither here nor there.  Doesn't matter if you're shocked, give what you saw.  And by saying that you were shocked it seems to me that you are coming on here looking to hear somebody tell you that you did the right thing.  Well, you didn't even come close to doing the right thing.  

And I also agree with your partners texts.

No, I obviously didn't do the right thing. Reason I'm posting is because I still feel like crap about it. I usually just read posts here but felt like I had to ask for help and see what other people thought and I just wondered how common it was to see a guy appeal to the BU in B or C.

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Just now, Mr_Blue said:

No, I obviously didn't do the right thing. Reason I'm posting is because I still feel like crap about it. I usually just read posts here but felt like I had to ask for help and see what other people thought and I just wondered how common it was to see a guy appeal to the BU in B or C.

Yes, it's common. Most of the time, it's either super oviis and you say yes he did, or you're not absolutely sure and say no he did not.

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1 minute ago, Mr_Blue said:

No, I obviously didn't do the right thing. Reason I'm posting is because I still feel like crap about it. I usually just read posts here but felt like I had to ask for help and see what other people thought and I just wondered how common it was to see a guy appeal to the BU in B or C.

 

1 minute ago, Mr_Blue said:

No, I obviously didn't do the right thing. Reason I'm posting is because I still feel like crap about it. I usually just read posts here but felt like I had to ask for help and see what other people thought and I just wondered how common it was to see a guy appeal to the BU in B or C.

It's very common.  And you need to call your partner to apologize asap.

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2 minutes ago, umpstu said:

I'm confused as to why you were in the C slot and then, after a check swing appeal, you went to the A slot?  What was the reason for being on the C slot in the first place?  

Sorry. I forgot it wasn't the very next batter that the ejection happened on. I was in A when it happened so it was during one of the next few at bats.

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1 minute ago, udbrky said:

 

Yes, it's common. Most of the time, it's either super oviis and you say yes he did, or you're not absolutely sure and say no he did not.

Usually the only time you say he went is if he literally corkscrews into the ground.  

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1 minute ago, umpstu said:

Usually the only time you say he went is if he literally corkscrews into the ground.  

Yeah, that's the super oviis part.

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I can't believe this, especially after what I've written today, but I'm taking the "softer side" on this.

Not on the call - even if shocked, you should have just given what you had.  And it led to the SH*#storm that followed.

But - again, opinion of HokieUmp, LLC only - the partner was a dick about it.  Kind of massively.  Sure, it was a bad look on the call, and it led to an EJ.  But gunning the batter on strike one later was HIS cock-up, even if events got him distracted.  More importantly, I'm not a fan of the switching out AND the follow-up dickishness via text.  If you're man enough to text someone to call names, and run down the person's level, be man enough to say it to them AT THE TIME.  Better still, help a brother out by walking him through the issue.  (Unless, of course, you're one of those that believes keeping others down helps you get better ball OR that the umpire world is just SO chockers with people, that we don't need all the guys working we can get.)

Dude's a dick.

I'm not even sure I can get behind the "apologize to him" camp, unless he's a 'big dog' and might screw up your schedule.  My return text might be:  "sorry for the mistake and the problems it caused.  but don't worry about us working together from this end."  With an optional* "go F*#K yourself."

(*May not be optional.)

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It was wrong for him to switch crews and it was wrong for him to text you like that.  Did you screw him?  Sure.  But instead of using it as a chance to help you learn, your partner pouted and then sends you a scathing text?  That's BS.

I suspect if I went to my partner and he replied with "It's your call," I would more forcefully ask, "DID. HE. GO?!!" and put it right back on him.  Then we would have a conversation after the game to help him better understand 2 man mechanics and working as a crew.  It is the responsibility of more advanced umpires to help those coming up.  Guys that don't see it that way are just hurting the brotherhood.

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57 minutes ago, HokieUmp said:

I can't believe this, especially after what I've written today, but I'm taking the "softer side" on this.

Not on the call - even if shocked, you should have just given what you had.  And it led to the SH*#storm that followed.

But - again, opinion of HokieUmp, LLC only - the partner was a dick about it.  Kind of massively.  Sure, it was a bad look on the call, and it led to an EJ.  But gunning the batter on strike one later was HIS cock-up, even if events got him distracted.  More importantly, I'm not a fan of the switching out AND the follow-up dickishness via text.  If you're man enough to text someone to call names, and run down the person's level, be man enough to say it to them AT THE TIME.  Better still, help a brother out by walking him through the issue.  (Unless, of course, you're one of those that believes keeping others down helps you get better ball OR that the umpire world is just SO chockers with people, that we don't need all the guys working we can get.)

Dude's a dick.

I'm not even sure I can get behind the "apologize to him" camp, unless he's a 'big dog' and might screw up your schedule.  My return text might be:  "sorry for the mistake and the problems it caused.  but don't worry about us working together from this end."  With an optional* "go F*#K yourself."

(*May not be optional.)

Glad you said this before me. Don't we need all the help we can get out there? Why not use it as a teachable moment? 

Which brings up a question - is it common for associations to have formal or informal black lists of umps they won't use? If you have a personal blacklist do you regularly turn down gigs because of it or is there a place in your scheduling software that allows you to make your blacklist known?

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13 hours ago, Mr_Blue said:

Sorry. I forgot it wasn't the very next batter that the ejection happened on. I was in A when it happened so it was during one of the next few at bats.

My random thoughts:

(1) You need to invest in a good mechanics book.  In your case, I recommend purchasing the "Minor League Baseball Manual for the Two-Umpire System".  There are several mechanics books out there.  Many will recommend the CCA (college) Manual.  The CCA Manual is great if you're looking for a book with easy-to-digest diagrams that show you where to start and where to go when the ball is put in play.  And, in fact, I do use that manual when I'm looking to refresh myself on rotations, etc.  The Minor League Manual, however, covers a lot of stuff that the CCA Manual does not discuss, including check swings.  As the MiLB Manual states, "PU may ask BU on his own for help on a check swing if in doubt."  And, there is absolutely no restriction on asking the base umpire for help when the base umpire is in "B" or "C".  In fact, the PU must ask the BU for help (no matter what position the BU is in) if the PU rules that that the batter did not swing and the defensive manager/coach wants an appeal.

The bottom line is that it appears that you need to learn more some two-man advanced mechanics.

(2)  You stated that you're young and just moving up to the varsity level.  As such, if we were together and you made this mistake, we would have had a long talk after the game with a goal of making you better (and not a goal of humiliating you).  With that said, your partner did not do that.  I don't know what his experience level is, nor do I know what his "place" is in your association.  I would likely text him back and apologize and say that "you're still trying to learn".  (As stated above, don't add any qualifiers to your apology other than to say "I'm learning".)  With that said, I wouldn't do much more. Clearly, he's not interested in making you a better umpire. 

(3)  You wrote in a post above, "but in all my years of playing and watching baseball from little league through HS and up until now I honestly haven't seen a PU appeal to a guy in B or C."  The likely reason that this is the case is because "in all (those) years," you were watching the game as a player and not as an umpire.  I'm willing to bet that at some point in your playing career (or during some game you watched as a fan) that this type of appeal did, in fact, occur.  You just didn't notice because you weren't watching the game as an umpire.  You need to make sure from now on that you are watching games as an umpire (assuming that you are no longer still playing at some level).  In short, your experiences as a player don't mean SH*# as an umpire.  In fact, being a former player (especially if you played at a high level) can be a hindrance to being a good umpire.  The reason is that as a player you are trained to watch developing plays during the game in a certain way.  As an umpire, you need to watch the game in a completely different manner.  Frankly, when I have guy call me asking to join our high school association I always ask , "what experience do you have".  When they respond with, "well, I played all the way through college," I respond with, "so, you have no experience".  [As an aside: I then work to get them in an umpire camp and working local youth leagues.]  In short, your experiences as a player don't really matter anymore.

(4) Use this as a learning experience.  But make it a "Big" learning experience and not a "small" learning experience.  A small learning experience is if you walk away saying only, "now I know that if the plate umpire appeals to me on a check swing when I'm in "B" or "C", I need to give him what I've got."  That's fine...but I challenge you to reach for a bigger learning experience.  A "Big" learning experience will have you walking away saying to yourself, "what other 2-man mechanics have I not picked up over my seven years of umpiring?  I need to get into a detailed mechanics book and really break down my mechanics.  Or, maybe, I need to attend a good 2-man mechanics camp."

Good Luck to you!

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17 minutes ago, lawump said:

My random thoughts:

...........

1. I have Baseball Umpiring Mechanics Illustrated published by Referee magazine that my state (Kansas) mailed me for 2 and 3 man high school crews. I've learned a lot since getting affiliated with the state. I obviously need to keep reading the stuff they've sent me so hopefully something like this doesn't happen again. I've always done my best and haven't had any big problems until now.

 

2. I probably won't reply. I feel like he's the type of guy that wouldn't care if I said I was sorry and that it was my fault. He would just say something like damn right it's your fault, now leave me alone. I already said I don't want to talk to you. If I see him in the future after he's had time to cool off I'll apologize, but if he's still a dick about it then I'll just let it go and not talk to him again. I felt like he was pretty full of himself from the moment we met in the parking lot. Wore aviator sunglasses the whole game, which I haven't seen someone do yet. Might have been a rock star, who knows.

 

3. You're right. I definitely watch the game differently now and focus more on the umpires than the game sometimes.

 

4. I would love to attend a GOOD 2-man camp. I drove 3 hours to do an 8 hour class that my state put on for guys with 0-5 years experience but it was an okay class at best. We didn't really do much and most of it was explaining the absolute basics to guys who were totally new. Umpiring isn't something taken too seriously here because the majority of it is smaller size towns that can barely put a team together. I'm lucky if I'm able to work with a guy who even shows up looking like an umpire and not wearing black work boots with a striped football referee hat and an old raggedy brown leather belt. The Mid-American Umpire clinic they're doing this year in Springfield would probably be good, but I might have to wait a year before trying that.

 

Thanks for taking the time to reply. Hopefully I can work with guys more like you in the future.

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You have gotten some good advice here. One concern I have. Twice you mention “being behind the pitcher” in “c”.  I’m thinking your starting position is too far up he middle. You should be on an imaginary line from home plate through the grass/ dirt line on the side of the mound, and half way between the rubber and 2B. It’s really to the side of the pitcher. If you’re behind the pitcher, you are probably too far towards the 

middle of the infield. 

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If your partner asks, it does not matter why he asks, and it does not matter where you are, be it in A, B, C, D. As the BU give the he went with the hand raised like an out, or no he didn't go with the arms out safe sign.

Remember, in all rules, the only time the PU can ask for help at all, is when the PU says the batter did not swing. There is no appeal if the PU says the batter did swing to get that decision reversed by the BU.

There may be some levels, "and high school may be one of the levels", in which the home plate umpire does not have to/is not forced to ask for help. If the PU determines in their mind that the batter went and he calls a strike or the batter did not go and he says no he did not go, he is not obligated to get help, (either on his own or upon request of the asking team) from his partner the BU.

In other levels, you have no choice but to ask the BU if the PU says the batter did not swing and get that second opinion upon request.

But, if the PU does ask, the BU gives what he has at all levels.

Now you may run into some old school, dinosaur umpires that want to work out, kind of a compromise with their partner. They may ask for help with their "full hand" open towards their partner/BU if they want their partner/BU to go with them (no he did not go) no matter what it looked like to the partner/BU on the call of swing or no swing. However, if they want the partner/BU to truly give the call they see, they will "point" at their partner with their pointer finger when they ask for help.

I would not recommend the above, but it may happen and would be more indicative of a prior era and also with a coach that was known to ask to check any time a batter flinched just to jerk the umpires chain, or maybe in retaliation for a perceived (maybe yes, maybe no) missed call, for the rest of the game. If this old school method were to be used, this would be pre-gamed with the umpires, and not some hope of telepathy during the game from an umpire using this method, to someone who might not have heard of this, or does not know this is how the old school umpire handles it.

Once again, if asked by the PU--give what you have, no matter your position on the field.

And listen to any advice lawump gives

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2 hours ago, Richvee said:

You have gotten some good advice here. One concern I have. Twice you mention “being behind the pitcher” in “c”.  I’m thinking your starting position is too far up he middle. You should be on an imaginary line from home plate through the grass/ dirt line on the side of the mound, and half way between the rubber and 2B. It’s really to the side of the pitcher. If you’re behind the pitcher, you are probably too far towards the 

middle of the infield. 

Yeah that's where I set up too. I didn't necessarily mean exactly behind the pitcher. I saw a guy who's B position was in the outfield this year...

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@Mr_Blue we've all been learning, each and every game.  It's been said that 90% of the game is played within 10% of the rules.  It's our job to be able to interpret them all in the event of a "not so common" type situation.  You've done well. you recognized, you asked for help............now, you need to move on.  You're only as good as your next call.  Don't dwell on this one @$$clown.  We're not all like him. As someone eluded to earlier, we are short officials.  Don't let this sour your taste for something you obviously enjoy.

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Mr. Blue, as others have said, don’t let this sour you.  Seems as if you have a pretty good grasp on this, but I don’t think we can say it enough.

You will work with all sorts of guys and gals over the years.  You learn something from all of them, even if that is “I don’t want to be like that guy.”

Getting started is tough.  You constantly hear about the shortage of officials in all sports, but we do a miserable job (in general) in helping develop new umpires and providing them with an environment they want to stay in.  Most of the studies will tell you new umpires who leave within 5 years do so because of the coaches/fans.  I would tell you that it is OUR fault for not helping the new guys in those situations or with supporting their efforts to get started and helping them get established.

I was registered for high school for almost two years before I started filling my schedule.  I would respond to calls for replacements that day (or in the near future) but coaches, ADs, and especially other umpires would see that I was new and turn me down.  I just about quit because I kept spending money and wasn’t making any.  In Year 3 people stopped turning me down.  I had virtually no more experience than the year before (or the year before that for that matter), but people didn’t view me as “new”.  That’s the kind of crap we need to get past.  Take on a new partner, work with younger umpires, and help them stay in the game.

I worked a day-long rotation with a new umpire a few weeks ago at a softball tournament.  I’ve known her for a while, but I had never worked with her.  As part of our pre-game, I asked her “What feedback do you want from me?  Anything specific you want me to watch?”  She said “I learn in small doses.  Give me one good thing and two things to work on.”  I could have given her much more (good and bad), but that would have overwhelmed her.  In that role, our job isn’t to fix everything today, it is to help our partner get better over time every time.

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Live, learn and move on.  An umpire's mental approach has to similar to that of an elite closer.  You are going to make mistakes and you have to let them go because you will be back out there tomorrow.  Try not to make the same mistake twice.

Your partner does not get any points under the "Mentorship" category.  As some of our other esteemed colleagues noted here, this would have been an opportunity for him to counsel you.

One more item to consider, this should be a topic you discuss with your partner in the pre-game chat.  Remember, a good pre-game can go a long way to preventing a lousy post-game.  

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On ‎7‎/‎15‎/‎2019 at 4:20 PM, Mr_Blue said:

1. I have Baseball Umpiring Mechanics Illustrated published by Referee magazine that my state (Kansas) mailed me for 2 and 3 man high school crews. I've learned a lot since getting affiliated with the state. I obviously need to keep reading the stuff they've sent me so hopefully something like this doesn't happen again. I've always done my best and haven't had any big problems until now.

 

2. I probably won't reply. I feel like he's the type of guy that wouldn't care if I said I was sorry and that it was my fault. He would just say something like damn right it's your fault, now leave me alone. I already said I don't want to talk to you. If I see him in the future after he's had time to cool off I'll apologize, but if he's still a dick about it then I'll just let it go and not talk to him again. I felt like he was pretty full of himself from the moment we met in the parking lot. Wore aviator sunglasses the whole game, which I haven't seen someone do yet. Might have been a rock star, who knows.

 

3. You're right. I definitely watch the game differently now and focus more on the umpires than the game sometimes.

 

4. I would love to attend a GOOD 2-man camp. I drove 3 hours to do an 8 hour class that my state put on for guys with 0-5 years experience but it was an okay class at best. We didn't really do much and most of it was explaining the absolute basics to guys who were totally new. Umpiring isn't something taken too seriously here because the majority of it is smaller size towns that can barely put a team together. I'm lucky if I'm able to work with a guy who even shows up looking like an umpire and not wearing black work boots with a striped football referee hat and an old raggedy brown leather belt. The Mid-American Umpire clinic they're doing this year in Springfield would probably be good, but I might have to wait a year before trying that.

 

Thanks for taking the time to reply. Hopefully I can work with guys more like you in the future.

Calling @MidAmUmp

 

Want a very good two man clinic... http://midamericanumpireclinic.com/home.html

 

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