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Guest Kayrocker

Winning Pitcher

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Guest Kayrocker

The home team scores one run in the 1st inning.  For whatever reason, the home team uses a different pitcher every inning, 9 pitchers.  The home team wins 1-0.  Which pitcher gets the win and why?

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3 minutes ago, Guest Kayrocker said:

The home team scores one run in the 1st inning.  For whatever reason, the home team uses a different pitcher every inning, 9 pitchers.  The home team wins 1-0.  Which pitcher gets the win and why?

The official scorer decides.  The only one it cannot be is the starter because the starter has to go 5 to be the winner.

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2019 OBR Rule 9.17(b) Comment: It is the intent of Rule 9.17(b) that a relief pitcher pitch at least one complete inning or pitch when a crucial out is made, within the context of the game (including the score), in order to be credited as the winning pitcher. If the first relief pitcher pitches effectively, the Official Scorer should not presumptively credit that pitcher with the win, because the rule requires that the win be credited to the pitcher who was the most effective, and a subsequent relief pitcher may have been most effective. The Official Scorer, in determining which relief pitcher was the most effective, should consider the number of runs, earned runs and base runners given up by each relief pitcher and the context of the game at the time of each relief pitcher’s appearance. If two or more relief pitchers were similarly effective, the Official Scorer should give the presumption to the earlier pitcher as the winning pitcher.

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Guest BoomerSooner

Senor Azul's response cites the rule and supports Rich's reply that it is up to the official scorer. Given that the game finished 1-0 and every pitcher pitched 1 inning, there isn't anything that significantly differentiates the performance of any single pitcher over all of the others. In that case, you would go with the earliest pitcher the is eligible for the win, which would be the one that pitched the second inning.

Obviously a pitcher could have loaded the bases in his inning which on the surface doesn't seem as effective as a pitcher that might have struck out the side, but I can say from my research and discussions with other scorers that more weight is given to outs recorded and runs allowed, then the other criteria listed in the rule are considered. In the original example, every pitcher recorded 3 outs and allowed 0 runs, so their effectiveness is pretty similar. Using the original example with a twist: Had the second pitcher come in and loaded the bases without recording an out or even just 1 out and a substitute came in to finish the inning without allowing a run, the substitute would likely be considered more effective especially considering he had to work out of the jam.

I'll close with the point that ultimately this situation would be up to the official scorer and is essentially a judgement call. One scorer could completely disagree with my statements and I'd respect that just the same as I would another umpire's judgement calls on the field. 

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11 hours ago, Guest Kayrocker said:

The home team scores one run in the 1st inning.  For whatever reason, the home team uses a different pitcher every inning, 9 pitchers.  The home team wins 1-0.  Which pitcher gets the win and why? 

Trick question. The umpire is the winner: this 9-inning game was done in 1:42.

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12 hours ago, Guest Kayrocker said:

The home team scores one run in the 1st inning.  For whatever reason, the home team uses a different pitcher every inning, 9 pitchers.  The home team wins 1-0.  Which pitcher gets the win and why?

The scorekeeping-mom's son.

 

(You knew that was coming.)

Note that in NCAA, if the coach declares ahead of time that the starter is not going to pitch 5 innings, then the starter can get the win.  (I forget the exact wording, and I'm not interested enough to look it up.)

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1 hour ago, noumpere said:

The scorekeeping-mom's son.

 

(You knew that was coming.)

Note that in NCAA, if the coach declares ahead of time that the starter is not going to pitch 5 innings, then the starter can get the win.  (I forget the exact wording, and I'm not interested enough to look it up.)

That would be a very interesting adoption in MLB - especially if teams continue the opener trend, or move to what I think should/will happen - instead of starting every six games - and hoping to get 5/6/7 innings, you have three pitchers who throw three innings every four games.  You would only need ten or eleven pitchers on the roster - just keep one or two in case of injuries...or if someone does REALLY bad...but typically, you will get the full three innings...once, one and a half times, through the lineup , the vast majority of the time.

 

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2019-2020 NCAA rule 10-25

b. If the starting pitcher does not pitch enough innings, the win is credited to a relief pitcher in the following manner:

3) By pre-arrangement, if three or more pitchers are to be used, the pitcher of record shall be considered the winning pitcher.

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