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Guest Steven Baker

Charging Runs To A Pitcher

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Guest Steven Baker

This is more an official scorer's question.  I was listening to a game recently in which the starting pitcher was removed with a runner on first.  The relief pitcher came in a got the hitter to hit into a fielder's choice, the runner at first out at second.  The new runner scored.

I thought I heard the announcer say the run was charged to the starting pitcher.  This makes some sense, since the reliever got his man out.  Did I mishear or was the announcer wrong?

Who is charged with the run.  It makes a difference in some instances, if that proves to be the tie-breaking, and, therefore, winning run.  I've watched baseball a long time and have never heard of that run being charged to the starting pitcher, since the runner on base was faced by the reliever.

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29 minutes ago, Guest Steven Baker said:

This is more an official scorer's question.  I was listening to a game recently in which the starting pitcher was removed with a runner on first.  The relief pitcher came in a got the hitter to hit into a fielder's choice, the runner at first out at second.  The new runner scored.

I thought I heard the announcer say the run was charged to the starting pitcher.  This makes some sense, since the reliever got his man out.  Did I mishear or was the announcer wrong?

Who is charged with the run.  It makes a difference in some instances, if that proves to be the tie-breaking, and, therefore, winning run.  I've watched baseball a long time and have never heard of that run being charged to the starting pitcher, since the runner on base was faced by the reliever.

From the scoring rules. Example 2 covers your situation.

 

(g) When pitchers are changed during an inning, the Official
Scorer shall not charge the relief pitcher with any run (earned
or unearned) scored by a runner who was on base at the time
such relief pitcher entered the game, nor for runs scored by any
runner who reaches base on a fielder’s choice that puts out a
runner left on base by any preceding pitcher.

(2) Peter is pitching. Abel reaches first base on a base on
balls. Roger relieves Peter. Baker forces Abel at second
bases. Charlie grounds out, advancing Baker to second
base. Daniel singles, scoring Baker. Baker’s run is
charged to Peter.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Guest Steven Baker said:

This is more an official scorer's question.  I was listening to a game recently in which the starting pitcher was removed with a runner on first.  The relief pitcher came in a got the hitter to hit into a fielder's choice, the runner at first out at second.  The new runner scored.

I thought I heard the announcer say the run was charged to the starting pitcher.  This makes some sense, since the reliever got his man out.  Did I mishear or was the announcer wrong?

Who is charged with the run.  It makes a difference in some instances, if that proves to be the tie-breaking, and, therefore, winning run.  I've watched baseball a long time and have never heard of that run being charged to the starting pitcher, since the runner on base was faced by the reliever.

If nobody was on base, the ground ball would have resulted in that batter getting out (or reaching on error).   The only reason the batter reached base was because the previous pitcher allowed the previous batter to reach base.   The reliever shouldn't be "punished" for that technicality in being charged for that run.

The reliever's effectiveness in these situations is recorded in the "inherited runners scored" set of stats instead, and that is the more relevant metric.   Because, it's conceivable for a reliever to allow 100% of his inherited runners to score and to also have a 0.00 ERA, and even no losses charged to him.

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Guest Steven Baker

Thanks guys.  You learn something new every day.

 

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