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quick pitch? my fault?


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batter fouls one off to bring the count to 3 & 2, I point and say play just like always and the batter turns back and looks at me as if to say "hu?" I say "I said play" as the batter turns back to face the pitcher F1 is about to release the ball and the batter just stands there to get rung up. 3BC makes some comments about his batter not being ready as he heads to the dugout. I know I blew this one or I wouldn't have been thinking about it all night. It wasn't a quick-pitch just a fast working F1 and a slow thinking batter. looking back the best I think I could have done would be after F2 gloves the ball say no pitch and tell F1 to wait until the batter is ready. any suggestions. Thanks, 1

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I used to have this issue. Whenever I put the ball back in play after a foul, I simply held up the count, then pointed and said "play". B2 turns around and says "whuh?", then F1 pitches or halts or

The key is that you need to keep your eye on F1 the whole time. If you do that, then you should not let the pitch happen with the batter looking back. I know these things happen quickly, but we have to protect the batters in these cases - especially the stupid ones. It's just too dangerous to have a pitch coming in with a batter that doesn't know it's coming.

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I used to have this issue. Whenever I put the ball back in play after a foul, I simply held up the count, then pointed and said "play". B2 turns around and says "whuh?", then F1 pitches or halts or some stuff.

Now, I verbalize the whole thing: "THREE, TWO. . . PLAY!"

It's a rhythm and ritual I follow on every foul, runners or not. Players get used to it and "PLAY!" does not stop the show anymore.

In it's entirety, My checklist goes like this:

"FOUL!"

1. F1 on the rubber

2. F2 ready

3. B2 ready

4. 8 fielders in fair territory

5. Runners returned to their bases (or close enough)

6. Partner is ready

"THREE, TWO. . . PLAY!"

I have been doing it this way for a while, and it catches all the annoying variables before they turn in to problems.

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I used to have this issue. Whenever I put the ball back in play after a foul, I simply held up the count, then pointed and said "play". B2 turns around and says "whuh?", then F1 pitches or halts or some stuff.

Now, I verbalize the whole thing: "THREE, TWO. . . PLAY!"

It's a rhythm and ritual I follow on every foul, runners or not. Players get used to it and "PLAY!" does not stop the show anymore.

In it's entirety, My checklist goes like this:

"FOUL!"

1. F1 on the rubber

2. F2 ready

3. B2 ready

4. 8 fielders in fair territory

5. Runners returned to their bases (or close enough)

6. Partner is ready

"THREE, TWO. . . PLAY!"

I have been doing it this way for a while, and it catches all the annoying variables before they turn in to problems.

Excellent mechanic, I always do the same, even if the batter fouls 4 or 5 in a row. I always give the count and announce play. I do work with guys that don't annouce, simply point, if there are no runners. I prefer to do the same, runners or not, it keeps the players used to the system.

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Excellent mechanic, I always do the same, even if the batter fouls 4 or 5 in a row. I always give the count and announce play. I do work with guys that don't annouce, simply point, if there are no runners. I prefer to do the same, runners or not, it keeps the players used to the system.

Yep, my 'ritual' is just about the same and it works fine.

An extra bonus I feel I get when done with every foul is that it it becomes a real habit.

And that makes forgetting it in a situation with runners almost impossible.

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Once a batter becomes "aware" to a pitcher, you are no longer responsible to protect him from the quick pitch. When putting a ball back in play, you would not consider the batter 'ready' until he is aware to the pitcher. What you define as "aware" is your judgement.

In this instance, the batter seemed aware, however, he wanted to have a conversation with you (for whatever reason) - you can either ignore this and just drop into your stance and call the pitch, or call time - I support the call of time here, since your attention was diverted from the incoming pitch by engaging the conversation.

Unfortunately, if the batter gazes off after the ball is put into play, and turns back just in the nick of time to eat a fastball, it is his fault. Older players should know better than to look away after play is called; protect younger players by calling time again if their attention is diverted.

It may also be worth it, at lower ages, to give a quick "here we go guys" so that your catcher and the batter know you are about to call 'play.' Typically this isn't an issue in older ages as catchers aren't putting down a sign until the ball is put back in play.

Bottom line, once the batter is "aware" to the pitcher and bails out without asking for time, you do not need to protect him from the quick pitch.

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