Jump to content

Point of Windup Rule


zoops

Recommended Posts

Had a long game where, in the 9th inning, the losing team of a 13-4 game brings in a reliever and on his first pitch is violating the windup position rule.  There were a load of substitutions between innings and I didn't get a chance to watch him during warmups.  First base coach starts barking that it should be an illegal pitch.  So I warned the pitcher.  Side question - do you count that pitch as a ball or strike or is it a no pitch?

My partner and I were talking after the game - what exactly is the point of this new rule?  Especially with no runner on base, what advantage is gained by the pitcher?  I know I could make a point either way, but just figured I'd look for some discussion on it.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 11
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

I assume this is the issue you are talking about.  The penalty seems clear to me.

 

a�

The Windup

The pitcher shall stand with his chest and shoulders generally

facing the batter, with the pivot foot on or in front of and touching the

pitcher’s plate with the other foot free�

From this position, any natural movement associated with the delivery of

the ball to the batter commits the pitcher to pitch without interruption or

alteration� The pitcher shall not raise either foot from the ground, except that

in the actual delivery of the ball to the batter, the pitcher may take one step

backward or sideward and one step forward with the free foot�

PENALTY—Warning on first offense. Illegal pitch shall be called on subsequent

offenses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/9/2017 at 8:36 PM, zoops said:

No doubt the rule and penalty are clear.  I guess I'm looking for discussion on why this rule is needed.  

It was explained at the Baltimore clinic that pitchers were rotating their pivot foot so much at the start of their windup that if there was a runner on third the runner could not tell if he was in the stretch or a windup so it would limit his lead. He was pivoted around that much from the onset and the rules interpreter demonstrated it.  Penalty with no one on is warning if base runners - balk, no warning.  I've personally never seen it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, celt62 said:

It was explained at the Baltimore clinic that pitchers were rotating their pivot foot so much at the start of their windup that if there was a runner on third the runner could not tell if he was in the stretch or a windup so it would limit his lead. He was pivoted around that much from the onset and the rules interpreter demonstrated it.  Penalty with no one on is warning if base runners - balk, no warning.  I've personally never seen it.

If the pitcher could pick from either stance how would not knowing what it was limit R3s lead?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, celt62 said:

I guess he meant when pitchers go from a windup R3 usually takes a huge lead vs a set position.  That's the only thing I can figure but that's what he said.

Maybe a huge secondary. I fail to see the need to protect dumb R3s and dumb umpires. On second thought, maybe we should protect dumb umpires.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Jimurray said:

Maybe a huge secondary. I fail to see the need to protect dumb R3s and dumb umpires. On second thought, maybe we should protect dumb umpires.

I wouldn't call it protecting dumb R3s or dumb umpires. Correct me if I'm wrong but this rule isn't new. It just hasn't been enforced and since been made an point of emphasis. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not an NCAA rulebook expert, but I don't think there was a rule before this that provided these details or penalties.  I must have thrown my old rule books away, but I am pretty sure it was similar to the OBR rule (below).  About the only reason I can see for this being needed is when a runner is on 3rd, as @celt62 said.  In my case, it gave a couple coaches a reason to get annoyed (gave the offense a reason to whine and gave the DC a reason to get annoyed being warned about it when they're down 9 runs in the 9th inning).  I suppose players and coaches will get used to the rule and we won't see anyone violating it after a year or two.  

(1) The Windup Position The pitcher shall stand facing the batter, his pivot foot in contact with the pitcher’s plate and the other foot free. From this position any natural movement associated with his delivery of the ball to the batter commits him to the pitch without interruption or alteration. He shall not raise either foot from the ground, except that in his actual delivery of the ball to the batter, he may take one step backward, and one step forward with his free foot. When a pitcher holds the ball with both hands in front of his body, with his pivot foot in contact with the pitcher’s plate and his other foot free, he will be considered in the Windup Position. Rule 5.07(a)(1) Comment (Rule 8.01(a) Comment): In the Windup Position, a pitcher is permitted to have his “free” foot on the rubber, in front of the rubber, behind the rubber or off the side of the rubber. From the Windup Position, the pitcher may: (A) deliver the ball to the batter, or (B) step and throw to a base in an attempt to pick-off a runner, or (C) disengage the rubber (if he does he must drop his hand to his sides). In disengaging the rubber the pitcher must step off with his pivot foot and not his free foot first. He may not go into a set or stretch position—if he does it is a balk.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, JDavis225 said:

I wouldn't call it protecting dumb R3s or dumb umpires. Correct me if I'm wrong but this rule isn't new. It just hasn't been enforced and since been made an point of emphasis. 

The current rule is one or two years old. Prior to that NCAA mimicked the MLB/OBR rule for one or two years. Prior to that NCAA had the heel of the free foot no further foward than the toe of the pivot foot in the windup. A pitcher in the CWS ignored that restriction and the umpires ignored that violation. It was said that some areas were not enforcing that rule. So NCAA mimicked the OBR rule until people complained and NCAA then stuck an arrow in the pitchers chest. Normally a sideways pitcher will have diifferent entry stances to his windup and set and most of us can tell what he is going to do. If some wanted to game the system he probably could not reveal what he was going to do until first movement. It would then be apparrent to R3. Since the pitcher could pick from either stance what would R3 do different until first movement?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.






×
×
  • Create New...