Jump to content

Two Odd Continuous Batting Order Situations


DVA7130
Umpire-Empire locks topics which have not been active in the last year. The thread you are viewing hasn't been active in 2812 days so you will not be able to post. We do recommend you starting a new topic to find out what's new in the world of umpiring.

Recommended Posts

I had the two following happen in the same game, USSSA Rules, age doesn't matter, both teams using continuous orders (no subs).

A. Team A has a player slide into third and comes up with a bleeding nose. Per communicable disease protocol I allow him to leave without penalty and tell the coaches that as long as his uniform isn't soiled, he can rejoin the lineup without penalty when ready. While the team was looking for their last out to put on third, I hear a coach mention he was their pitcher, but I didn't think anything of it. Next inning, they have a pitching change, and I record it. Later in the inning there is a mound visit and they call who was bleeding back to the mound. I disallow it because he was already replaced on the mound. The coach simply responded, "I don't know enough about it to argue it".

B. Team B announces to U1 that their leadoff is injured and can not continue. He is declared out without issue. In USSSA, if a player is removed he can not re-enter the lineup baring concussion or blood concerns (really the rule is to not penalize teams for removing players in these situations). In the bottom of the last inning in a now close ballgame Team B is having a rally without any outs recorded. I start to get suspicious and cross check who is batting on the lineup. The injured player's spot was four batters ago. I bring it to the coach's attention, and he responds, "He is feeling better now". I find the scorekeeper to find out what he did, and apparently he walked and scored. The best thing I could come up with to fix it was to take a run off the board and add an out. This goes surprisingly smoothly with Team B who is no longer tied, but a run behind.

Thoughts?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 2
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

In A, I think you did everything correct.  You can not re-enter a pitcher after you have pulled him from the mound.  He can play anywhere else on defense except pitch.  In sit. B  I think you should have allowed him to re-enter because they really didn't pull him, just kept him from taking his turn at bat one time for which they took the appropriate penalty of an out.  If he is now ok to hit, then he just hits in his normal spot.  I don't think that's something you can go back and fix in the manner that you did by taking a run off the board and calling an out.  Also as an umpire, I'm not going to the score keeper unless the other team brings it up.  Just my opinion though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Within the context of Amateur ball (younger than 18, non-NFHS), and barring any specific ruleset modifications (Perfect Game, etc.)...

A. We do something similar. The varied range of tournaments and leagues that I do may or may not allow for a courtesy runner, and when they do, it may be an "available sub" clause. More and more rarely is it "last batted out". Some only allow for catcher, while others allow for pitchers and catchers. If you have no other recourse but to employ a "last batted out" for a "special one-time courtesy runner" on account of an injury of this nature (bleeding, head trauma, debilitation, etc.), I have yet to see an Amateur-level coach gripe, complain or protest this. We have time-limit tournament games wherein a batter gets plunked – hard – in the helmet. He may or may not be okay, but I am not going to have a player pass out while standing near 1B on me. So, we will typically allow a "special one-time courtesy runner" for this bell-rung player while he's being checked out on the bench for a concussion. If he truly is alright, he can rejoin the action when the team flips over for defense or they bat around to get to his spot again. If he's not able to continue participating, then we do that "injury withdrawal" (there are many other terms for this) and scratch his name from the lineup and compress the lineup (so long as it doesn't drop below 8).

When you removed the player from the bases and used that special courtesy runner, you didn't remove the player from the game. When the team performed that pitching change, they effectively removed that player from the game, and while he can re-enter at a different defensive position, he cannot pitch again in that game. No different than any other time.

B. If Team B took the penalty for a player unable to take his at-bat of an out (whether he's temporarily injured, indisposed or in-de-bathroom), then that player is able to resume his spot and participation in the lineup without penalty further along in the game. I've had coaches present to me a CBO lineup with 12 players on it, but I'm only counting 11 in the dugout; the coach tells me that Little Billy (the 12th) is at band recital and will get here soon, and really want him to participate. I tell him that if he gets here prior to his first at-bat, no worries. If his at-bat arrives before Billy does, the coach has the choice whether to strike Billy from the lineup completely or to take the out in the hopes that Billy will get here soon. 

The same goes for ticky-tack injuries. If/when a coach informs me of an injury, I present them with the choice – if we remove the player from the game, there is no penalty, but that player is done for that game and can no longer participate at all; if he wants to see how it goes, then the penalty of an out for failure to take his at-bat must be applied.

You are exceeding your scope and range as an umpire to seek out a situation like what you're describing and then to retroactively impose out(s) and take run(s) off the board.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


×
×
  • Create New...