Jump to content

Double-A, Triple-A to implement pitch clock


Recommended Posts

A day at a Minor League ballpark sometimes flies by. This year, Double-A and Triple-A baseball games may go even faster.

At this week's Owners Meetings in Arizona, pace-of-game has been a key item on the agenda. Negotiations with the Players' Union are ongoing, but reports indicate that a 20-second pitch clock will be used at the two upper levels of the Minor Leagues this season.

The pitch clock was first implemented in affiliated ball during select games in the 2014 Arizona Fall League season. In the AFL, a violation of the 20-second clock was grounds for an automatic ball granted to the batter.

[Click here for full article]

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 5
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Days

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I've never paid $100 to see our local AA affiliate. Sometimes $5/ticket, occasionally $10, sometimes nothing.   The average time of a minor league game is probably closer to 2:15. Since the batter's

This was a big discussion at our local association meeting. Imo, it's ridiculous. I believe a good umpire can manage the game time just fine. The only time I've seen game time management not controlled was by new umpires that didn't know any better, and I was guilty of that too in the beginning. Is this a real problem or someone getting their panties in a wad about needing to make a solution for a problem that isn't there?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never paid $100 to see our local AA affiliate. Sometimes $5/ticket, occasionally $10, sometimes nothing.

 

The average time of a minor league game is probably closer to 2:15. Since the batter's box rule is aggressively enforced at that level, I can't imagine the clock ever making a difference there.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is an emphatic, full-blown farce.

If _anyone_ trots out a reason other than the one I'm presenting below, they're lying to you. It has nothing to do with player safety, fan attendance numbers, attendance revenues (tickets, concessions, merchandise, etc), facilities costs, competition level or value, or any other concoction or fabrication. It is:

Packaging.

The NFL (and by association, college football) have cultured an extremely lucrative broadcast model, wherein the broadcast companies gut each other so as to get the rights to broadcast a relative handful of games. The NFL holds the threat of blackouts against a city/region, and insomuch, the broadcast company, if the stadium doesn't get filled. Why do the broadcast companies take on this monster? We all know about the in-game advertising revenue, in the form of endorsements, product placement, broadcast sponsorships (this terrible halftime show is brought to you by... ), and commercials. Good Lord, the _commercials_! Football games are guaranteed to have blocks of sellable commercial time (change of possession, timeouts, scoring, quarter changes). The NBA, too, pursues a similar model (_another_ block of commercials??!! Only five seconds have come off the clock in the past fifteen minutes!!), but the NFL has it down to a measured science (called "metrics"). Baseball has blocks of time to fill with commercials, namely during half-innings and pitching changes. _When_ they occur really futzes with metrics, and it's more challenging to sell airtime to a marketing company when the time-of-deployment is so vague (Thank you for you commercial. According to contract, it will appear at the beginning of the first pitching change, which may be in the 3rd inning, 6th inning, or not at all.) Marketing, like baseball, is _all_ about metrics.

Metrics is a means of measuring performance over time. Baseball is that odd team sport that defies time – a game can, conceivably, go on indefinitely (until Bud steps in and declares a tie... Thanks a lot, Bud). This is the single, greatest thing keeping the broadcast companies from throwing bags of money at Major League Baseball; the broadcast companies can absorb and tolerate the sporadic nature of available blocks of time in a baseball game. What gives them fits and keeps them up at night and keeps them from signing the check to carry all those baseball games is that _they can't guarantee when the game will end with any acceptable variance_. They can't sell the highly lucrative advertising space (and times) for the television shows that _follow_ a game broadcast. Those advertising and marketing execs who write _those_ checks for that commercial that will air at exactly 7:07pm on Sunday night during Madame Secretary _need_ that guarantee. With _rare_ occurrence, a football game will start at 3:00pm and conclude its broadcast by 6:00pm. Local / regional news can cover for that flex time, but the 7:00pm start of a national title show (and its commercials) isn't jeopardized.

Baseball can't give any guarantees. There is no defined _package_. One game may go 8.5 innings and last 2 hours 15 minutes. Another may go 14 innings and crawl through 4 hours! Broadcast companies lose (potential) money any time a game goes beyond time limits, and/or has more stoppages than reasonably expected. Yeah, they run commercials again, but they can't charge the marketing companies more for these occurrences. Its less risky with the NFL... but it's maddening with baseball (_another_ pitching change?!?! How many pitchers you got left?!)

The MLB franchise owners look upon increased operating costs with little ability to expand their revenue streams beyond the status quo, and they see the NFL owners broker staggering contracts with broadcast companies falling over themselves to make these deals. The sentiment is that if the game can show more consistency in a packaged time slot, then it will be more attractive to the broadcast companies and their advertising capital.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never paid $100 to see our local AA affiliate. Sometimes $5/ticket, occasionally $10, sometimes nothing.

 

The average time of a minor league game is probably closer to 2:15. Since the batter's box rule is aggressively enforced at that level, I can't imagine the clock ever making a difference there.

Should have clarified. Was thinking if this makes it to the MLB.  I don't even like it at the college level. Have coaches stop taking so long to give signals.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.






×
×
  • Create New...