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Story From This Past Season


DVA7130
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I do not contribute too much original content on this site, but here is a story from this past season with insight on the level of ball I hope to move out of, an odd situation, and a failure on my part.

Setting is an USSSA sub-state 7U coach-pitch tournament. I am working solo.

With R3 and R2 and one out, B1 knocks one out of left field for a homerun. I move out to the center of the diamond to watch touches. Offensive team crowds around home to celebrate. Third base coach comes down to try to hold them back. R3 touches home with no problem, but R2 makes it to the dirt circle and decides he is too good to touch home then directly joins the crowd. As the BR is approaching home, third base coach realizes the missed touch and physically tries to hold BR back from touching home. The BR, who was upset his moment was being ruined, struggled with the coach to make it home. R2 realizes why this is happening and rushes to touch home. Even with the effort, the BR touches home a few seconds before R2.

I enthusiastically point at home then freeze for half a second, embarrassed I turn and hope nobody saw. I then started to work it out in my head.

I figured that R2 would be out on appeal because his retouch was nullified by the BR's touch of home. I also figured that the BR should be out for coach interference, but since no one seemed upset about it, and I failed to call it in the moment, I would leave that can of worms alone. The play stood with no outs and all runs scoring as there was no appeal.

Later in the inning the defense asks if I called the kid out for missing home.

I say, "No, there was never an appeal"

"Like at any other base?"

"Yes"

"Oh". :shrug:

While no one was upset about the play, there was no protest, trash thrown on the field, or even argument, I was not happy with how I handled it. I feel that I should have immediately called the BR out for coach interference when my point and "instinct" told me to. Taking the run off the board and recording the out. Also then if there was an appeal, B2 would also be declared out for the missed base leaving three outs, only one scoring and the end of the inning.

That being said I submit a few questions to the community.

Can I call coach interference when the ball is already dead?

If so what are the mechanics, do I still announce Time! or just declare the runner out?

Does a following runner touching a base nullify any possible retouch by a previous runner like my current understanding of the rules?

How in the heck are appeals supposed to be conducted in 7U coach pitch?

Can I have a deadball appeal from a coach like FED, or do I need a 7 year old to actually get the ball from the Offensive pitching coach and tag the base?

Thanks for considering this mess.

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Bottom line is that you understood the rules just fine:

 

1.  Yes, a runner can be declared out if physically assisted by a coach on a ball that's dead.  In this case, no need to call time (the ball is dead anyway), but a coach assisting a runner is a delayed dead ball anyway.  It wouldn't matter here since there will not be any continuing action on the play.  You would simply point to the infraction, "that's interference" and call the runner out.

2.  Yes, a runner who fails to touch the plate before a following runner scores is subject to being called out on appeal, even if he goes back and touches the plate after the following runner scores.

3.  USSSA is based on OBR, so no dead ball appeal is allowed.  With coach pitch, I suppose the player that is the "pitcher" would need to engage the rubber with the ball so the ball could be properly put back into play for the appeal to be carried out.  Not sure though.

 

I think you did just fine.  If nobody complained, why take a HR away from a 7 year old because of his coach's blunder?  That said, I don't know how serious these coach pitch tournaments are.

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Bottom line is that you understood the rules just fine:

 

1.  Yes, a runner can be declared out if physically assisted by a coach on a ball that's dead.  In this case, no need to call time (the ball is dead anyway), but a coach assisting a runner is a delayed dead ball anyway.  It wouldn't matter here since there will not be any continuing action on the play.  You would simply point to the infraction, "that's interference" and call the runner out.

2.  Yes, a runner who fails to touch the plate before a following runner scores is subject to being called out on appeal, even if he goes back and touches the plate after the following runner scores.

3.  USSSA is based on OBR, so no dead ball appeal is allowed.  With coach pitch, I suppose the player that is the "pitcher" would need to engage the rubber with the ball so the ball could be properly put back into play for the appeal to be carried out.  Not sure though.

 

I think you did just fine.  If nobody complained, why take a HR away from a 7 year old because of his coach's blunder?  That said, I don't know how serious these coach pitch tournaments are.

 

I respectfully disagree with point #1.

 

Rule 5.02 OBR "While the ball is dead no player may be put out, no bases may be run and no runs may be scored"

 

In order for 7.09(h) regarding coaches interference to be applied, interference must be called... Interference, by its definition, results in an out. To be an out, there must be a live ball.

 

I don't think any type of dead ball interference is possible then. It's a four base award on a home run.

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Bottom line is that you understood the rules just fine:

1. Yes, a runner can be declared out if physically assisted by a coach on a ball that's dead. In this case, no need to call time (the ball is dead anyway), but a coach assisting a runner is a delayed dead ball anyway. It wouldn't matter here since there will not be any continuing action on the play. You would simply point to the infraction, "that's interference" and call the runner out.

2. Yes, a runner who fails to touch the plate before a following runner scores is subject to being called out on appeal, even if he goes back and touches the plate after the following runner scores.

3. USSSA is based on OBR, so no dead ball appeal is allowed. With coach pitch, I suppose the player that is the "pitcher" would need to engage the rubber with the ball so the ball could be properly put back into play for the appeal to be carried out. Not sure though.

I think you did just fine. If nobody complained, why take a HR away from a 7 year old because of his coach's blunder? That said, I don't know how serious these coach pitch tournaments are.

I respectfully disagree with point #1.

Rule 5.02 OBR "While the ball is dead no player may be put out, no bases may be run and no runs may be scored"

In order for 7.09(h) regarding coaches interference to be applied, interference must be called... Interference, by its definition, results in an out. To be an out, there must be a live ball.

I don't think any type of dead ball interference is possible then. It's a four base award on a home run.

Runners can't be "put out" but can be "declared" out while the ball is dead.

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Bottom line is that you understood the rules just fine:

1. Yes, a runner can be declared out if physically assisted by a coach on a ball that's dead. In this case, no need to call time (the ball is dead anyway), but a coach assisting a runner is a delayed dead ball anyway. It wouldn't matter here since there will not be any continuing action on the play. You would simply point to the infraction, "that's interference" and call the runner out.

2. Yes, a runner who fails to touch the plate before a following runner scores is subject to being called out on appeal, even if he goes back and touches the plate after the following runner scores.

3. USSSA is based on OBR, so no dead ball appeal is allowed. With coach pitch, I suppose the player that is the "pitcher" would need to engage the rubber with the ball so the ball could be properly put back into play for the appeal to be carried out. Not sure though.

I think you did just fine. If nobody complained, why take a HR away from a 7 year old because of his coach's blunder? That said, I don't know how serious these coach pitch tournaments are.

I respectfully disagree with point #1.

Rule 5.02 OBR "While the ball is dead no player may be put out, no bases may be run and no runs may be scored"

In order for 7.09(h) regarding coaches interference to be applied, interference must be called... Interference, by its definition, results in an out. To be an out, there must be a live ball.

I don't think any type of dead ball interference is possible then. It's a four base award on a home run.

 

Runners can't be "put out" but can be "declared" out while the ball is dead.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

 

Would we call the interference on a high five/slap on the butt? Or if (hypothetical of course) the player broke his leg rounding third and was carried by a preceding runner (or the coach) to home? Both could be seen as "assisting the runner" with the ball dead.

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Bottom line is that you understood the rules just fine:

1. Yes, a runner can be declared out if physically assisted by a coach on a ball that's dead. In this case, no need to call time (the ball is dead anyway), but a coach assisting a runner is a delayed dead ball anyway. It wouldn't matter here since there will not be any continuing action on the play. You would simply point to the infraction, "that's interference" and call the runner out.

2. Yes, a runner who fails to touch the plate before a following runner scores is subject to being called out on appeal, even if he goes back and touches the plate after the following runner scores.

3. USSSA is based on OBR, so no dead ball appeal is allowed. With coach pitch, I suppose the player that is the "pitcher" would need to engage the rubber with the ball so the ball could be properly put back into play for the appeal to be carried out. Not sure though.

I think you did just fine. If nobody complained, why take a HR away from a 7 year old because of his coach's blunder? That said, I don't know how serious these coach pitch tournaments are.

I respectfully disagree with point #1.

Rule 5.02 OBR "While the ball is dead no player may be put out, no bases may be run and no runs may be scored"

In order for 7.09(h) regarding coaches interference to be applied, interference must be called... Interference, by its definition, results in an out. To be an out, there must be a live ball.

I don't think any type of dead ball interference is possible then. It's a four base award on a home run.

I agree with Greyhawk.

You can declare a runner out because of the interference.

And runs can score on a dead ball.

A HR is a dead ball once it goes over the fence and the run scores.

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Bottom line is that you understood the rules just fine:

1. Yes, a runner can be declared out if physically assisted by a coach on a ball that's dead. In this case, no need to call time (the ball is dead anyway), but a coach assisting a runner is a delayed dead ball anyway. It wouldn't matter here since there will not be any continuing action on the play. You would simply point to the infraction, "that's interference" and call the runner out.

2. Yes, a runner who fails to touch the plate before a following runner scores is subject to being called out on appeal, even if he goes back and touches the plate after the following runner scores.

3. USSSA is based on OBR, so no dead ball appeal is allowed. With coach pitch, I suppose the player that is the "pitcher" would need to engage the rubber with the ball so the ball could be properly put back into play for the appeal to be carried out. Not sure though.

I think you did just fine. If nobody complained, why take a HR away from a 7 year old because of his coach's blunder? That said, I don't know how serious these coach pitch tournaments are.

I respectfully disagree with point #1.

Rule 5.02 OBR "While the ball is dead no player may be put out, no bases may be run and no runs may be scored"

In order for 7.09(h) regarding coaches interference to be applied, interference must be called... Interference, by its definition, results in an out. To be an out, there must be a live ball.

I don't think any type of dead ball interference is possible then. It's a four base award on a home run.

 

I agree with Greyhawk.

You can declare a runner out because of the interference.

And runs can score on a dead ball.

A HR is a dead ball once it goes over the fence and the run scores.

 

 

For the sake of discussion, what differentiates the two: a pat on the butt as the batter-runner rounds third and this prevention of the runner touching? Both involve the 3BC "physically assisting" the runner.

 

And I'd say, just based on what 5.02 says that the runs technically "score" as soon as the ball lands in DBT for a home run... They can then "un-score" upon proper appeal anywhere.

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Would we call the interference on a high five/slap on the butt? Or if (hypothetical of course) the player broke his leg rounding third and was carried by a preceding runner (or the coach) to home? Both could be seen as "assisting the runner" with the ball dead.

 

I hope no one here thinks that the high 5/slap on the rear end/hand shake is in any way any sort of assist. But I know it's a rules myth that many umpires enforce. That's why you hear coaches and players yell "Don't touch him!". Because some bone head umpire called someone out for doing it.

 

Now, actually holding up, or helping a runner is a whole different thing.

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Would we call the interference on a high five/slap on the butt? Or if (hypothetical of course) the player broke his leg rounding third and was carried by a preceding runner (or the coach) to home? Both could be seen as "assisting the runner" with the ball dead.

 

I hope no one here thinks that the high 5/slap on the rear end/hand shake is in any way any sort of assist. But I know it's a rules myth that many umpires enforce. That's why you hear coaches and players yell "Don't touch him!". Because some bone head umpire called someone out for doing it.

 

Now, actually holding up, or helping a runner is a whole different thing.

 

I agree, and it's a rules myth, which is why I mentioned it... 

 

Say instead, live ball or dead ball, a runner is rounding third sprinting for home... 3BC pushes him towards home... LBT, of course that's interference... DBT, what do you have?

 

He most definitely "physically assisted" the runner in going home either way. It was just relevant in LBT. Should relevance matter?

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Bottom line is that you understood the rules just fine:

1. Yes, a runner can be declared out if physically assisted by a coach on a ball that's dead. In this case, no need to call time (the ball is dead anyway), but a coach assisting a runner is a delayed dead ball anyway. It wouldn't matter here since there will not be any continuing action on the play. You would simply point to the infraction, "that's interference" and call the runner out.

2. Yes, a runner who fails to touch the plate before a following runner scores is subject to being called out on appeal, even if he goes back and touches the plate after the following runner scores.

3. USSSA is based on OBR, so no dead ball appeal is allowed. With coach pitch, I suppose the player that is the "pitcher" would need to engage the rubber with the ball so the ball could be properly put back into play for the appeal to be carried out. Not sure though.

I think you did just fine. If nobody complained, why take a HR away from a 7 year old because of his coach's blunder? That said, I don't know how serious these coach pitch tournaments are.

I respectfully disagree with point #1.

Rule 5.02 OBR "While the ball is dead no player may be put out, no bases may be run and no runs may be scored"

In order for 7.09(h) regarding coaches interference to be applied, interference must be called... Interference, by its definition, results in an out. To be an out, there must be a live ball.

I don't think any type of dead ball interference is possible then. It's a four base award on a home run.

 

I agree with Greyhawk.

You can declare a runner out because of the interference.

And runs can score on a dead ball.

A HR is a dead ball once it goes over the fence and the run scores.

 

 

For the sake of discussion, what differentiates the two: a pat on the butt as the batter-runner rounds third and this prevention of the runner touching? Both involve the 3BC "physically assisting" the runner.

 

And I'd say, just based on what 5.02 says that the runs technically "score" as soon as the ball lands in DBT for a home run... They can then "un-score" upon proper appeal anywhere.

 

 

7.09 It is interference by a batter or a runner when—(h) In the judgement of the umpire, the base coach at third base, or first base, by touching or holding the runner, physically assists him in returning to or leaving third base or first base.

 

the base coach can "touch" the runner, physical assistance must be an intentional act by the base coach to prevent a runner from advancing, or aiding the runner in advancing. Therefore, the base coach could even have physical contact with the runner that forces the runner to return and it not be physical assistance.

 

A base coach could have his hands up to stop the runner, and the runner could run into those hands extending out to stop the runner and it not be physical assistance if in YOUR judgement it wasn't an intentional act to physically assist the runner in any way.

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Bottom line is that you understood the rules just fine:

1. Yes, a runner can be declared out if physically assisted by a coach on a ball that's dead. In this case, no need to call time (the ball is dead anyway), but a coach assisting a runner is a delayed dead ball anyway. It wouldn't matter here since there will not be any continuing action on the play. You would simply point to the infraction, "that's interference" and call the runner out.

2. Yes, a runner who fails to touch the plate before a following runner scores is subject to being called out on appeal, even if he goes back and touches the plate after the following runner scores.

3. USSSA is based on OBR, so no dead ball appeal is allowed. With coach pitch, I suppose the player that is the "pitcher" would need to engage the rubber with the ball so the ball could be properly put back into play for the appeal to be carried out. Not sure though.

I think you did just fine. If nobody complained, why take a HR away from a 7 year old because of his coach's blunder? That said, I don't know how serious these coach pitch tournaments are.

I respectfully disagree with point #1.

Rule 5.02 OBR "While the ball is dead no player may be put out, no bases may be run and no runs may be scored"

In order for 7.09(h) regarding coaches interference to be applied, interference must be called... Interference, by its definition, results in an out. To be an out, there must be a live ball.

I don't think any type of dead ball interference is possible then. It's a four base award on a home run.

 

I agree with Greyhawk.

You can declare a runner out because of the interference.

And runs can score on a dead ball.

A HR is a dead ball once it goes over the fence and the run scores.

 

 

For the sake of discussion, what differentiates the two: a pat on the butt as the batter-runner rounds third and this prevention of the runner touching? Both involve the 3BC "physically assisting" the runner.

 

And I'd say, just based on what 5.02 says that the runs technically "score" as soon as the ball lands in DBT for a home run... They can then "un-score" upon proper appeal anywhere.

 

 

7.09 It is interference by a batter or a runner when—(h) In the judgement of the umpire, the base coach at third base, or first base, by touching or holding the runner, physically assists him in returning to or leaving third base or first base.

 

the base coach can "touch" the runner, physical assistance must be an intentional act by the base coach to prevent a runner from advancing, or aiding the runner in advancing. Therefore, the base coach could even have physical contact with the runner that forces the runner to return and it not be physical assistance.

 

A base coach could have his hands up to stop the runner, and the runner could run into those hands extending out to stop the runner and it not be physical assistance if in YOUR judgement it wasn't an intentional act to physically assist the runner in any way.

 

 

Understood. I only used that to relate the at-topic discussion with a common rule myth.

 

A better comparison would be to my most recent. Coach physically pushes his runner toward home, or even picks him up and carries him to home... I don't see a difference other than the percieved impact on the defense.

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Bottom line is that you understood the rules just fine:

1. Yes, a runner can be declared out if physically assisted by a coach on a ball that's dead. In this case, no need to call time (the ball is dead anyway), but a coach assisting a runner is a delayed dead ball anyway. It wouldn't matter here since there will not be any continuing action on the play. You would simply point to the infraction, "that's interference" and call the runner out.

2. Yes, a runner who fails to touch the plate before a following runner scores is subject to being called out on appeal, even if he goes back and touches the plate after the following runner scores.

3. USSSA is based on OBR, so no dead ball appeal is allowed. With coach pitch, I suppose the player that is the "pitcher" would need to engage the rubber with the ball so the ball could be properly put back into play for the appeal to be carried out. Not sure though.

I think you did just fine. If nobody complained, why take a HR away from a 7 year old because of his coach's blunder? That said, I don't know how serious these coach pitch tournaments are.

I respectfully disagree with point #1.

Rule 5.02 OBR "While the ball is dead no player may be put out, no bases may be run and no runs may be scored"

In order for 7.09(h) regarding coaches interference to be applied, interference must be called... Interference, by its definition, results in an out. To be an out, there must be a live ball.

I don't think any type of dead ball interference is possible then. It's a four base award on a home run.

 

I agree with Greyhawk.

You can declare a runner out because of the interference.

And runs can score on a dead ball.

A HR is a dead ball once it goes over the fence and the run scores.

 

 

For the sake of discussion, what differentiates the two: a pat on the butt as the batter-runner rounds third and this prevention of the runner touching? Both involve the 3BC "physically assisting" the runner.

 

And I'd say, just based on what 5.02 says that the runs technically "score" as soon as the ball lands in DBT for a home run... They can then "un-score" upon proper appeal anywhere.

 

 

7.09 It is interference by a batter or a runner when—(h) In the judgement of the umpire, the base coach at third base, or first base, by touching or holding the runner, physically assists him in returning to or leaving third base or first base.

 

the base coach can "touch" the runner, physical assistance must be an intentional act by the base coach to prevent a runner from advancing, or aiding the runner in advancing. Therefore, the base coach could even have physical contact with the runner that forces the runner to return and it not be physical assistance.

 

A base coach could have his hands up to stop the runner, and the runner could run into those hands extending out to stop the runner and it not be physical assistance if in YOUR judgement it wasn't an intentional act to physically assist the runner in any way.

 

 

Understood. I only used that to relate the at-topic discussion with a common rule myth.

 

A better comparison would be to my most recent. Coach physically pushes his runner toward home, or even picks him up and carries him to home... I don't see a difference other than the percieved impact on the defense.

 

 

yeah sorry was replying when you posted that.

 

any type of intentional physical assistance, whether play is alive or dead, needs to be called. If the ball is dead you would just point at the infraction and say "that's physical assistance, he's out" 

 

In the case of the coach carrying his runner home... if it is a dead ball award you may have a substitute runner finish the award for an injured player who cannot run the bases so that situation really shouldn't happen

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We can think up countless scenarios, but I would hope we all agree that the OP is most definitely physically assisting the runner.

I would caution using the word intentional with respect to a coach assisting. If a runner rounds third and trips and the coach (out of instinct) prevents the runner from failing, then interference is the correct call. It wasn't intentional, but it was physical assistance.

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Bottom line is that you understood the rules just fine:

 

1.  Yes, a runner can be declared out if physically assisted by a coach on a ball that's dead.  In this case, no need to call time (the ball is dead anyway), but a coach assisting a runner is a delayed dead ball anyway.  It wouldn't matter here since there will not be any continuing action on the play.  You would simply point to the infraction, "that's interference" and call the runner out.

2.  Yes, a runner who fails to touch the plate before a following runner scores is subject to being called out on appeal, even if he goes back and touches the plate after the following runner scores.

3.  USSSA is based on OBR, so no dead ball appeal is allowed.  With coach pitch, I suppose the player that is the "pitcher" would need to engage the rubber with the ball so the ball could be properly put back into play for the appeal to be carried out.  Not sure though.

 

I think you did just fine.  If nobody complained, why take a HR away from a 7 year old because of his coach's blunder?  That said, I don't know how serious these coach pitch tournaments are.

Thank you for the responses. Next time I just need to execute it seems.

@BigUmpire , I think I definitely go lucky nobody smelled blood in the water! Trust me there were several other times that weekend they tried to jump on me.

 

Other commenters, in my judgment I definitely believed it was coach interference with clear physical assistance, (Though how often you will see an offensive coach try to prevent his player from scoring Ha!) I think I just hesitated and got stuck on asking myself if I could on a dead ball, then afterword I recalled the instance of a injured runner on a HR.

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Ryan

You did just fine.

Remember the age group you were calling.

 

Always remember these Umpire bumper stickers:

 

  • "If it weren't for the parents...."-KLAH316
  • “Youth sports should be played by orphansâ€.- sdandersonjr
  • “Game management in youth ball can be like herding catsâ€-Bigumpire
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I had almost this same thing happen in a LL Majors game last year. In my case, it was the 1B coach, but he never touched the runner. He came running down and loudly told the BR to stop. The BR did stop and then he told the preceding runner to touch the plate (which he had missed).

The opposing coach complained that he shouldn't be allowed to come all the way down to the plate, to which I simply said, "on a dead ball?" He went right back to his dugout.

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We can think up countless scenarios, but I would hope we all agree that the OP is most definitely physically assisting the runner.

I would caution using the word intentional with respect to a coach assisting. If a runner rounds third and trips and the coach (out of instinct) prevents the runner from failing, then interference is the correct call. It wasn't intentional, but it was physical assistance.

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I DO agree it is "physical assistance"... I just don't think you can get an out for it with a dead ball.

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We can think up countless scenarios, but I would hope we all agree that the OP is most definitely physically assisting the runner.

I would caution using the word intentional with respect to a coach assisting. If a runner rounds third and trips and the coach (out of instinct) prevents the runner from failing, then interference is the correct call. It wasn't intentional, but it was physical assistance.

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I DO agree it is "physical assistance"... I just don't think you can get an out for it with a dead ball.

C'mon Man!!!
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We can think up countless scenarios, but I would hope we all agree that the OP is most definitely physically assisting the runner.

I would caution using the word intentional with respect to a coach assisting. If a runner rounds third and trips and the coach (out of instinct) prevents the runner from failing, then interference is the correct call. It wasn't intentional, but it was physical assistance.

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I DO agree it is "physical assistance"... I just don't think you can get an out for it with a dead ball.

 

C'mon Man!!!

 

Well, plus I find it fun to annoy you guys. *ducks

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Hey! I'm not stupid! I may even be right!

 

BRD pg. 191

 

309 - INTERFERENCE BY: COACH: ASSISTS RUNNER DURING: DEAD BALL

 

FED: Contact, even physical assistance, by a coach with a home run hitter who is advancing on a four-base award is legal. (3.2.2a) (See 310)

 

NCAA: Point Not Covered

    Off Interp 318-309: Paronto: "There is no coach's interference during a dead ball unless the coach's actions provide an advantage for the offensive team." (email to cc, 12/21/11)

 

OBR: No provision. Treat as in NCAA.

 

Play 167-309: R1 tries for third on B1's single, but F9's throw goes dead. R1 rounds the bag (he will be awarded home) but does not touch it. The coach grabs R1 by the arm and yells: "Go back and touch third." Ruling: At all levels, there is no penalty.

 

 

I'm going to email Carl Childress is regards to Paronto's comment though... Confusing.

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Hey! I'm not stupid! I may even be right!

BRD pg. 191

309 - INTERFERENCE BY: COACH: ASSISTS RUNNER DURING: DEAD BALL

FED: Contact, even physical assistance, by a coach with a home run hitter who is advancing on a four-base award is legal. (3.2.2a) (See 310)

NCAA: Point Not Covered

Off Interp 318-309: Paronto: "There is no coach's interference during a dead ball unless the coach's actions provide an advantage for the offensive team." (email to cc, 12/21/11)

OBR: No provision. Treat as in NCAA.

Play 167-309: R1 tries for third on B1's single, but F9's throw goes dead. R1 rounds the bag (he will be awarded home) but does not touch it. The coach grabs R1 by the arm and yells: "Go back and touch third." Ruling: At all levels, there is no penalty.

I'm going to email Carl Childress is regards to Paronto's comment though... Confusing.

I knew your day would come! Congrats!!!

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Hey! I'm not stupid! I may even be right!

BRD pg. 191

309 - INTERFERENCE BY: COACH: ASSISTS RUNNER DURING: DEAD BALL

FED: Contact, even physical assistance, by a coach with a home run hitter who is advancing on a four-base award is legal. (3.2.2a) (See 310)

NCAA: Point Not Covered

Off Interp 318-309: Paronto: "There is no coach's interference during a dead ball unless the coach's actions provide an advantage for the offensive team." (email to cc, 12/21/11)

OBR: No provision. Treat as in NCAA.

Play 167-309: R1 tries for third on B1's single, but F9's throw goes dead. R1 rounds the bag (he will be awarded home) but does not touch it. The coach grabs R1 by the arm and yells: "Go back and touch third." Ruling: At all levels, there is no penalty.

I'm going to email Carl Childress is regards to Paronto's comment though... Confusing.

 

I knew your day would come! Congrats!!!

 

Do I get a cookie?? I've always wanted a cookie.

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  • 1 month later...

Sorry to grave dig, but was this ever resolved? I'm having another discussion about it elsewhere.

 

BRD seems to indicate a runner can't be called out with a dead ball. Some here brought up the distinction between a put out and a declared out.

 

Thoughts?

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