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Catch/no Catch

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When there's a catch/no catch call in the outfield, I've always yelled catch and signaled out or yelled no catch and signaled safe. I've never had this happen, but catch and no catch sound similar, so I wanted to ask - what do you say/dont say here? I started to think about a situation like fair/foul: signal and yell for catch, signal without yell for trap. Is this a real mechanic?

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when it is a trap/ close no catch I will still verbalize no catch but put an emphasis on the NO, so it would be like "NO catch, NO catch, NO catch" while signaling safe. Not sure if its correct but thats what I do and I think it gets the point across

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I use catch or on the ground. It is usually just loud enough for my partner to hear while he is making the turn at first base. I do emphasize NO CATCH on a trap.

If I am making the call from B or C, I only say NO CATCH on a trap - I was told once that saying catch or out was a mute point, as the runner was making his decision to run by watching the ball or listening to the base coach.

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I'll also use "catch" or "it's on the ground" for the benefit of my partner when calling catches as PU. On a trap I'll give an emphatic "NO! It's on the ground!" along with a safe signal. I try to avoid "No Catch" simply because I don't want anyone hearing the word "catch" and getting the wrong idea, or give them any fuel for a "discussion" after the play because the runners heard "catch". 

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I use catch or on the ground. It is usually just loud enough for my partner to hear while he is making the turn at first base. I do emphasize NO CATCH on a trap. If I am making the call from B or C, I only say NO CATCH on a trap - I was told once that saying catch or out was a mute point, as the runner was making his decision to run by watching the ball or listening to the base coach.
You are not saying catch or no catch for the runners benefit. It's for your partner!
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If the play is such that it requires a verbal announcement along with the physical mechanic, it is either "That's a catch, that's a catch" or "No catch, no catch"

If for some reason the signal with the verbal is misinterpreted it is a them problem.

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If the play is such that it requires a verbal announcement along with the physical mechanic, it is either "That's a catch, that's a catch" or "No catch, no catch"

If for some reason the signal with the verbal is misinterpreted it is a them problem.

Why use two terms that can be misheard when you can make them completely different by saying "It's on the ground" or Ball is down"? Seems to be inviting trouble where there's no need for any.

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Catch - "That's a catch!" while making a big, over the head out mechanic

No catch - "No catch! No Catch!" while making an emphatic safe call

 

You're not inviting trouble.  You are communicating properly.  If there is any uncertainty whether a player caught a ball, what do they do?  Look at the umpire.  What are they going to see?  You making a safe or out call.  There should be no confusion.

 

As with any of my advice, you might need to adjust if you are working youth baseball where they don't necessarily understand how the game is supposed to be played.

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Catch - "That's a catch!" while making a big, over the head out mechanic

No catch - "No catch! No Catch!" while making an emphatic safe call

 

You're not inviting trouble.  You are communicating properly.  If there is any uncertainty whether a player caught a ball, what do they do?  Look at the umpire.  What are they going to see?  You making a safe or out call.  There should be no confusion.

 

As with any of my advice, you might need to adjust if you are working youth baseball where they don't necessarily understand how the game is supposed to be played.

How in the world would this be inviting trouble? This is the reason it is taught this way in pro school. Stick to basics. When in doubt, stick to basics again. Rinse then repeat.

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I say "No catch" or "Catch".  I do not state the "Ball is down" or "It's on the ground".  Call it a preference or using rulebook terminology.  But, I see no confusion in saying "No catch, No catch" with a safe signal.

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