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Older person looking into umpiring


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Hello, I am not only new to this site but I have been away from baseball for quite some time.  This year, a few things happened and I got the desire to get into baseball.  I'll save that for later, right now I would like a realistic assessment based on my situation.

I am 39, single, no family to support so I am not tied to anything.  Right now, money is not an issue and I can always walk away if it doesn't work out.  I have zero training as an umpire, and if I were to sign up for a training program like the Umpire School, I would be at the same experience level as a high schooler graduating but not in the same physical condition.

This has me concerned, because I am not necessarily unhealthy but I am not actively out exercising every day.  I am about 20 pounds overweight, no significant health problems, never smoked or had any major injuries besides a wrist injury when I was a teenager.  I have no problems standing for long periods of time.

Is it too late in the ball game to get involved with umpiring?  My goal actually is not to get to the MLB.  If that were to ever happen, great, but even if I were 20 and put in 10 years with minor league umpiring that doesn't guarantee anything.  I would be quite happy umpiring minor league baseball and doing other work.

If you think I should pursue this, I have a more specific question.  I understand some sprinting is required, but I am not sure exactly what this means.  I have seen some umpires with a bigger frame than me and they don't look like they are sprinting at all.  It's more like hustling.  How much is this a factor when selecting potential umpires for minor league umpiring?

Watching these umpires in the MLB, they look a lot older than I would expect.  Do they simply have a spot for life?  Or, are they held to the same physical requirements as say a 30-40 year old?

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At 39 you are on the short side of being able to make the cut for pro ball, particularly with no prior experience. However, if you can afford going to school, it is a great way to learn from the best, either school. There is plenty of umpiring that needs to be done besides pro umpiring. 

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I attended school at age 36. The only school who told me I had no shot was Jim Evans. Even though it wasn't pc for them to say that, at least they were honest. I highly recommend going to one of the schools, just not with any false hopes of working affiliated minor league ball. It is a great experience and a real eye opener as to what you don't know. Pretty much time is the one thing that will make you a good umpire, but attending school will help you with a start that others will not have. Best of luck.

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I am 43 and am attending umpire school this January. I fully discussed my age with the school staff frankly, and if my performance meets the criteria they will advance me to PBUC. They told me that if I were to be advanced that my age would be discussed. I have already put together a plan that shows I am a viable candidate and that all I ask for is a chance/shot at earning my way to MLB. Your age should not be a deciding factor to attend umpire school. Go for it. Do your best, and may God smile down on you.

 

I know that HE is a big part of my decision to go,and I've been prayerful about it. I WILL NOT be defeated!

 

Go for it!

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I believe that the professional umpire schools are looking to fill minor league jobs with folks that have the ability and desire to be the best so they can make it to MLB.  If you don't have a burning desire to make it to the show, then it would be hard to imagine putting up with the working conditions that exist in minor league ball for very long.

 

If baseball was a war, then minor league umpiring would be the equivalent of the civil war.  Worst conditions, most brutal fighting, low pay.  Everyone there is trying to make it to the show - players, coaches, umpires - probably even the announcers, so the pressure is significant.

 

At 39, you certainly don't fit the profile, and with no previous training and suspect physical condition, the chances of you knocking their socks off to give you a chance at PBUC are miniscule.

 

If I was you, and was committed to getting serious about umpiring and can afford the time and money to go to pro school, I absolutely would do that.  Then you can take that training back home and begin your resume with a real attention-getter!  Now start working anything and everything you can get your hands on.  Working lower level ball is actually a fantastic training ground because weird stuff happens with much more frequency.  Interference, obstruction, dropped infield fly, balks, etc.  If you try to start at a high level, then you will be much less likely to recognize these things, and even less likely to handle them properly, because they just don't happen as often.

 

Go forth and get trained.  There's no substitute for proper training.  Then work as much as you can, because there's also no substitute for experience!

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I really think the deciding factor would be whether you can afford to spend 8 - 10 years working in MiLB, for sub poverty level wages, on the off chance you might be picked up for MLB as a 50 year old rookie. That is the reality of this situation. Going to a umpire school will make you a better umpire for sure, and there is always a need for highly trained umpires in HS and college.

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I really think the deciding factor would be whether you can afford to spend 8 - 10 years working in MiLB, for sub poverty level wages, on the off chance you might be picked up for MLB as a 50 year old rookie. That is the reality of this situation. Going to a umpire school will make you a better umpire for sure, and there is always a need for highly trained umpires in HS and college.

Here is the list that I have prepared in response to the question of my age:

 

1. I'm 43 years old, mature, and settled.

2. I'm a Veteran of the Armed Forces, Honorably Discharged, and a disabled veteran whose disabilities will not impact performance. My disabled status helps MiLB/PBUC in hiring under minority/disabled status.

3. I'm a college graduate (Associates Degree) and can pursue my Masters at no cost due toTexas Hazelwood Act benefits at any time. Benefits are guaranteed.

4. I own and operate a small business producing one of a kind, custom model railroad equipment for museums, companies, and individuals.

5. I am not going to quit because the lifestyle is under-estimated. I have lived on the road and out of a suitcase for years.

6. I am single, with no obligations, and am able to focus on the task at hand.

7. I have experienced many seasons of challenges (no legal trouble) that has taught and allowed me to deal effectively with people.

8. I am always ready to receive instruction. You will not need to worry about me arguing. If you say "Go", I go. "Do", I do. "Stop." I stop.

9. I understand and believe in preserving the integrity of the game.

10. There are players over 40 years old. There are MiLB Umpires over 35 in the system. Why not me?

 

All I ask is for a legitimate chance to earn my place through professional behavior, hustle, heart, on and off the field.

 

I know I will have to work hard to show at 43 I can do it. I am determined. I fully understand that I could take 6-8 seasons to reach the potential of MLB fill in games. I could be between 50-55 before entering the MLB. That being said, and no mandatory retirement, I have the potential for a 20+ year career in the majors, on top of the 6-8 in the minors. It is not without question or beyond the realm of possibility.

 

I believe my entire life experience has led me to this point. It is in God's hands. That's the best place for it to be. His Will be done. Not mine.

 

That's my story, and I'm definitely stickin' to it!

 

 

AT 43, IF I CAN DO IT; AT 39, SO CAN YOU!

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9. I understand and believe in preserving the integrity of the game.

 

I have been visiting the MLB website.  Season coming to an end, and the world series is soon in sight.  I am a Detroiter, waiting since 84 for another win.

 

However, I don't like their tactics.  Who owns baseball?  Us or the conglomerates?

 

I will not play baseball but maybe I will umpire baseball.  I want to umpire baseball, but not iphone Steve Jobs  Microsoft Bill gates Nike or Adidas baseball.

 

I am the real deal and I want to umpire the real deal.  Right now, MLB's marketing tactic is like adding an "s" to a cell phone in order to make the big bucks.

 

What happened to the hot dogs?  If you are true to baseball, promote the products of the city you umpire in.  Don't go global. 

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9. I understand and believe in preserving the integrity of the game.

 

I have been visiting the MLB website.  Season coming to an end, and the world series is soon in sight.  I am a Detroiter, waiting since 84 for another win.

 

However, I don't like their tactics.  Who owns baseball?  Us or the conglomerates?

 

I will not play baseball but maybe I will umpire baseball.  I want to umpire baseball, but not iphone Steve Jobs  Microsoft Bill gates Nike or Adidas baseball.

 

I am the real deal and I want to umpire the real deal.  Right now, MLB's marketing tactic is like adding an "s" to a cell phone in order to make the big bucks.

 

What happened to the hot dogs?  If you are true to baseball, promote the products of the city you umpire in.  Don't go global. 

 

That's not what I meant by preserving the integrity of the game.

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9. I understand and believe in preserving the integrity of the game.

 

I have been visiting the MLB website.  Season coming to an end, and the world series is soon in sight.  I am a Detroiter, waiting since 84 for another win.

 

However, I don't like their tactics.  Who owns baseball?  Us or the conglomerates?

 

I will not play baseball but maybe I will umpire baseball.  I want to umpire baseball, but not iphone Steve Jobs  Microsoft Bill gates Nike or Adidas baseball.

 

I am the real deal and I want to umpire the real deal.  Right now, MLB's marketing tactic is like adding an "s" to a cell phone in order to make the big bucks.

 

What happened to the hot dogs?  If you are true to baseball, promote the products of the city you umpire in.  Don't go global. 

 

That's not what I meant by preserving the integrity of the game.

 

 

I know. Your goals are not mine.  I support your goals.

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I will not play baseball but maybe I will umpire baseball.  I want to umpire baseball, but not iphone Steve Jobs  Microsoft Bill gates Nike or Adidas baseball.

 

I am the real deal and I want to umpire the real deal.  Right now, MLB's marketing tactic is like adding an "s" to a cell phone in order to make the big bucks.

 

What happened to the hot dogs?  If you are true to baseball, promote the products of the city you umpire in.  Don't go global. 

 

I don't know what that means. 

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9. I understand and believe in preserving the integrity of the game.

 

I have been visiting the MLB website.  Season coming to an end, and the world series is soon in sight.  I am a Detroiter, waiting since 84 for another win.

 

However, I don't like their tactics.  Who owns baseball?  Us or the conglomerates?

 

I will not play baseball but maybe I will umpire baseball.  I want to umpire baseball, but not iphone Steve Jobs  Microsoft Bill gates Nike or Adidas baseball.

 

I am the real deal and I want to umpire the real deal.  Right now, MLB's marketing tactic is like adding an "s" to a cell phone in order to make the big bucks.

 

What happened to the hot dogs?  If you are true to baseball, promote the products of the city you umpire in.  Don't go global. 

 

:shrug:

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you are not too old for 99% of all baseball that is played in the US..........go to school, do your best,.......... take with you, our best wishes for your success.....regardless of outcome, you will come home a better umpire than you were prior.

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It's never to late to start calling baseball. I luckily started at 14 and am almost though my 6th year umpiring. However my dad started calling ball when he was in his 40s and has moved up rather quickly in the high school ranks. He and a lot of other guys I work with and we are both friends with tell me all the time that they wish they would have gotten into umpiring at the same age I did or just a bit older so they could have a shot at making it their career. The younger you start the better you off you are as far as a career is concerned but that doesn't mean it can't be a great side job or an excellent hobby. You could always go to umpiring school and learn as much as possible and if they don't select you for evaluation course or for a job after evaluation course you could alway go work high school and youth ball and work your way up from there into college ball.

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A disadvantage for you is if a 21 year old and you (43 years old) are both good umpires and there is no really big differences between the two of you they will choose the 21 year old 99% of time. That is just what I have learned from books, research, and personal stories.

Only PBUC will make a decision like that. Because there is an assumption that a 21 year old will put up with the crap you must in the minors AND you probably don’t have a family or other limitations to your schedule.

All other leagues, associations and organizations with a choice between 21 year old and a 43 year old will chose wisdom and experience assuming a 43 year old has more.

 

 

You must be 21.

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@metalheadumpire,

 

I read your statements with an open mind, and much of what you said is spot on. Concerning the age thing, I leave it in God's hands. No door that He opens, will be closed by man. No door that He closes, can be opened. That being said, I have placed my dream at His feet and I will let Him decide what path my life goes. I'm doing everything in my power, everything that I can do, to make it happen.

 

I already know the age game. I've already read Rick Roder's book. I fully understand the money game. I'm prepared. My whole focus is to go down and do the best job I can, learn as much, as I can, and come away a much better umpire than I know I already am. That's not said to boast or brag, it is to acknowledge the gifts and talents that God has given me. That being said, I will do everything in my power to win a position, even if I have to fight for it, morally and ethically.

 

I intend to have the best time of my life. I've already got one new friend in the hopper, and will do everything I can to help him succeed. My faith is what brought me back to the game. My faith will get me through this game. My faith will advance me in the game. God's will be done. Not mine.

 

Thanks for being candid, forthright, and blunt.

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A disadvantage for you is if a 21 year old and you (43 years old) are both good umpires and there is no really big differences between the two of you they will choose the 21 year old 99% of time. That is just what I have learned from books, research, and personal stories.

Only PBUC will make a decision like that. Because there is an assumption that a 21 year old will put up with the crap you must in the minors AND you probably don’t have a family or other limitations to your schedule.

 

 

 

 

All other leagues, associations and organizations with a choice between 21 year old and a 43 year old will chose wisdom and experience assuming a 43 year old has more.

 

 

 

 

 

You must be 21.

 

That's one of my assets: I don't have any ties, any family to worry about, or other limitations to my schedule. Yes, I have good experience. I hope they see it.

 

 

I TRUST GOD.

 I DARE TO DREAM

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A disadvantage for you is if a 21 year old and you (43 years old) are both good umpires and there is no really big differences between the two of you they will choose the 21 year old 99% of time. That is just what I have learned from books, research, and personal stories.

Only PBUC will make a decision like that. Because there is an assumption that a 21 year old will put up with the crap you must in the minors AND you probably don’t have a family or other limitations to your schedule.

 

 

 

 

All other leagues, associations and organizations with a choice between 21 year old and a 43 year old will chose wisdom and experience assuming a 43 year old has more.

 

 

 

 

 

You must be 21.

 

 

 

 

A disadvantage for you is if a 21 year old and you (43 years old) are both good umpires and there is no really big differences between the two of you they will choose the 21 year old 99% of time. That is just what I have learned from books, research, and personal stories.

Only PBUC will make a decision like that. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is what I was inferring. This whole topic is about Umpire School and PBUC.

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