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RingEmUp918

Trouble with close calls at first....

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I seem to be having trouble with close calls at 1st base over my past 4 or 5 games.  I dont know if I'm rushing the call or what, but safe always seems to be my first reaction and feel like i'm almost looking for a reason to call the runner safe.  I'm comfortable with my angle, but just dont feel like I'm getting these calls right.  Anyone else ever have this issue? Any pointers would be appreciated

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I know we're always taught angle over distance, but maybe you're a little too close.  Try to back up another 5-10 feet and see how that works. 

 

And are you having trouble from both A and B/C? 

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I dont know your experience level, but we probably all have that that feeling at one time or not in our careers.....my first reaction is to work on your timing....you say you are getting there amd are comfortable with your angle.... that's good......go back to the old standard "pause read and react".....use all your senses........see the play, hear the play,and dont rush it.......

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As metnioned, try backing up a little.  As far as looking for a reason to call them safe, outs get you off the field sooner.  Take your time and process the play.  Remember, it's nothing until you say it is.

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This happens to me when I am not relaxed. When I am not relaxed, I can't hear the pop and the thump and I would get a bit of tunnel vision.

When the infield is throwing to 1B between innings, use that time to practice watching the release of the ball, leaning on bad throws, shifting your eyes to the bag and listening to the pop. Imagine a batter runner hitting the bag at the same time. I am relaxed during this time and I can see everything well.

If I don't have the same feeling during the inning I know I need to remember to back off and breathe and that gets me back on track.

Don't change too many things at once, but pick one thing to do a little differently until you notice an improvement.

 

A clinician once told me that if a batter runner appears to be "standing" on the bag when the ball pops, then he is probably safe.   If his body is not there yet and only his foot is extended to the bag, then he is usually out.   Not scientific, but just another sanity check. 

 

And remember that the ball is moving a lot faster than the Batter runner.

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This happens to me when I am not relaxed. When I am not relaxed, I can't hear the pop and the thump and I would get a bit of tunnel vision.

When the infield is throwing to 1B between innings, use that time to practice watching the release of the ball, leaning on bad throws, shifting your eyes to the bag and listening to the pop. Imagine a batter runner hitting the bag at the same time. I am relaxed during this time and I can see everything well.

If I don't have the same feeling during the inning I know I need to remember to back off and breathe and that gets me back on track.

Don't change too many things at once, but pick one thing to do a little differently until you notice an improvement.

 

A clinician once told me that if a batter runner appears to be "standing" on the bag when the ball pops, then he is probably safe.   If his body is not there yet and only his foot is extended to the bag, then he is usually out.   Not scientific, but just another sanity check. 

 

And remember that the ball is moving a lot faster than the Batter runner.

 

 

Another great post Stephen.

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You say "safe always seems to be my first reaction" that's anticipating the call.

 

From the sounds of things you're getting frustrated, don't want to screw up, and are thinking too much.  Clear your head, relax and breathe.

 

From A -

Get your angle (preferably 90 deg. from the direction of the throw).  Read the throw and let the ball turn you to 1st.  Once you read a true throw, get set and watch the 1st baseman catch the ball.  As others have suggested, listen to the pop of the glove vs. the thud of the base.

 

From B or C -

Assume the throw is going to 1st.  Step up, turn and face the ball & start working towards 1st base.  Let the ball turn you to the play.  Get set as you would above.

 

Try that and see if it helps.

 

 

 

Damn, I've got to quit offering free advice or no one will come to my clinic!!!

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mostly A and B, havent had too many close ones from C.

You shouldnt be taking any plays at first base from C.

 

 

You could be starting in C when the ball is hit.  R3 or R2/R3 and the play goes to first base.  You aren't technically in the C position when you're making the call but you start from there.  

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mostly A and B, havent had too many close ones from C.

You shouldnt be taking any plays at first base from C.

 

You could be starting in C when the ball is hit.  R3 or R2/R3 and the play goes to first base.  You aren't technically in the C position when you're making the call but you start from there.

Correct. But he said he hasn't had too many close ones FROM C.

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Ideally you don't want to make any calls at 1B from C.  

 

The higher the level, you're expected to get to the other side of the mound for any call at 1B.

agreed and by "the higher the level" he means anytime you are working inside.

 

of course, if you are in C because it's R2 then you need to be ready to bounce back to the other side in case there's a throw back.

 

Getting the timing right so you are both set for the call at first and process it and then get back to third can take some work.  To many either cheat to third early or dont get set or overcommit to first.

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of course, if you are in C because it's R2 then you need to be ready to bounce back to the other side in case there's a throw back.

 

 

 

Good luck with that.  You're suggesting you go from C to B back to C on, for example, a groundball to F5 who throws to F3, who then throws back to F5 with R2 going to third?  On the groundball you get to a good working position for the play at first, but all you can do is pivot to get the play at third.  I had that play last year.  Fortunately, R2 being out at third for the third out allowed me to trot out to deep right while the 3rd base coach was screaming "How can you see THAT????"

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of course, if you are in C because it's R2 then you need to be ready to bounce back to the other side in case there's a throw back.

 

 

 

Good luck with that.  You're suggesting you go from C to B back to C on, for example, a groundball to F5 who throws to F3, who then throws back to F5 with R2 going to third?  On the groundball you get to a good working position for the play at first, but all you can do is pivot to get the play at third.  I had that play last year.  Fortunately, R2 being out at third for the third out allowed me to trot out to deep right while the 3rd base coach was screaming "How can you see THAT????"

 

I'm suggesting you go to the working area take a couple of steps toward first make the call make the double play drift back toward third and get set for that call.

 

you have more time than you do on the second to first double play so use it.

 

And other than at the start of the play Im probably no where near C or B

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It could be as much mental as anything. You could be anticipating a banger, as we can usually tell when one is coming, and tensing up trying not to kick it. So relax and as always :Horse: Slow Down. Timing, Timing, Timing. :Horse:  The next few calls you make at first ,make it a point to take longer than normal to make the call and see if that helps, and whatever your call is, make it with confidence.

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of course, if you are in C because it's R2 then you need to be ready to bounce back to the other side in case there's a throw back.

 

 

 

Good luck with that.  You're suggesting you go from C to B back to C on, for example, a groundball to F5 who throws to F3, who then throws back to F5 with R2 going to third?  On the groundball you get to a good working position for the play at first, but all you can do is pivot to get the play at third.  I had that play last year.  Fortunately, R2 being out at third for the third out allowed me to trot out to deep right while the 3rd base coach was screaming "How can you see THAT????"

 

 

 

Gooid Luck--but that is what you are supposed to do??  get to the first base side of the mound for the play at first then quickly get to the third base side of the mound for the play at third,; for the play at third stop to see the play then get closer to third to sell the call

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You say "safe always seems to be my first reaction" that's anticipating the call.

 

From the sounds of things you're getting frustrated, don't want to screw up, and are thinking too much.  Clear your head, relax and breathe.

 

From A -

Get your angle (preferably 90 deg. from the direction of the throw).  Read the throw and let the ball turn you to 1st.  Once you read a true throw, get set and watch the 1st baseman catch the ball.  As others have suggested, listen to the pop of the glove vs. the thud of the base.

 

From B or C -

Assume the throw is going to 1st.  Step up, turn and face the ball & start working towards 1st base.  Let the ball turn you to the play.  Get set as you would above.

 

Try that and see if it helps.

 

 

 

Damn, I've got to quit offering free advice or no one will come to my clinic!!!

They will still come. It is one thing to know the right place to be, another to be shown and confirmed you are actually doing it.

Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2

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I agree with those above who said you may be too close.  When I have problems with a close call at 1B it is either (a) I am too close, or (b) I take my eyes off the base, momentarily (some distraction occurs, usually a weird behavior by F3).  In A I always set up far enough back so when I take my two steps toward the plate on the pitch I am not going to end up too close to the base.

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Thank you everyon for the helpful tips.  had 6 games this weekend and it seems like I was just rushing the calls and not taking the time to let the play "register" in my head.  staying relaxed and focusing on listening to the play helped as well.

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It seems like I'm having the same issue...Had a play last night where the 1st baseman had to scoop the ball. I seem to have more problem when it's not clean...And of course I called him safe...I probably rushed my call.

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This happens to me when I am not relaxed. When I am not relaxed, I can't hear the pop and the thump and I would get a bit of tunnel vision.

When the infield is throwing to 1B between innings, use that time to practice watching the release of the ball, leaning on bad throws, shifting your eyes to the bag and listening to the pop. Imagine a batter runner hitting the bag at the same time. I am relaxed during this time and I can see everything well.

 

Even after 10 years of umpiring, I still use this in between innings drill (usually in the 1st inning). It prepares me and reminds me to not get locked into watching the ball. I want to be watching the bag and listening for the glove pop. This drill is a good way to practice before you have a real banger.  And as others have suggested slow down. Some umpires keep put one foot forward and both hands on that knee when seeing the play. One hand holds the other one down to keep you from coming up too soon and allows you the time to process what you've seen/heard. 

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