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Well, this is in the equipment forum, but...

1. It's relatively unstable.

2. It puts undue stress on the spinal column.

3. It is more fatiguing than other stances.

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I never liked the scissors it just looks awkward

Completely agree. Although if you can pull it off more power to you.

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all those reasons listed above and the fact that it isnt taught at the pro schools anymore would be my guess......... I dont have a lot of guys who still use this stance.....in our training classes we do not teach the scissors or the knee........(only tim mcclellend at 7'16" can pull off the knee wothout looking lazy.......)

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I am a big guy, 6'6" 285, and have always been intrigued with working on a knee like McClelland. That was always my reason not to, because I had heard it looked lazy. I used it in a 10U tournament I called this summer(I almost always call 14 and up) because I felt like I couldn't get low enough otherwise. I liked it a lot, but haven't done it again since. As someone of my height, would it still be considered taboo?

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I am a big guy, 6'6" 285, and have always been intrigued with working on a knee like McClelland. That was always my reason not to, because I had heard it looked lazy. I used it in a 10U tournament I called this summer(I almost always call 14 and up) because I felt like I couldn't get low enough otherwise. I liked it a lot, but haven't done it again since. As someone of my height, would it still be considered taboo?

If it suits you and you can get down, and lock in nicely for that age group, as long as you stand to make your call and you don't get stuck and can't bust out to follow the ball, I say you're fine...

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As a very long scissor guy, I know all the downsides to the stance.

1. It's unstable.....It is the least stable of the stances but once you learn it, that is no longer true.

2. Puts more stress on your back....Absolutely untrue.

3. Leads to neck injuries by being hit......Possibly true but I know of no single scissor guy to suffer an injury from being hit.

4. Can't clear fast enough.....Absolutely no problem with clearing.

My problems with the stance.....

1. I can't get a good third strike mechanic on LH batters.

2. You have to go down later than in other stances.....I don't have a problem with it but I get dinged by partners as being late.

My particular likes....

1. Easier on my knees.

2. It presents a smaller profile, never had a cup shot.

3. I work a little farther off the catcher.

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As a very long scissor guy, I know all the downsides to the stance.

1. It's unstable.....It is the least stable of the stances but once you learn it, that is no longer true.

2. Puts more stress on your back....Absolutely untrue.

3. Leads to neck injuries by being hit......Possibly true but I know of no single scissor guy to suffer an injury from being hit.

4. Can't clear fast enough.....Absolutely no problem with clearing.

My problems with the stance.....

1. I can't get a good third strike mechanic on LH batters.

2. You have to go down later than in other stances.....I don't have a problem with it but I get dinged by partners as being late.

My particular likes....

1. Easier on my knees.

2. It presents a smaller profile, never had a cup shot.

3. I work a little farther off the catcher.

Huh?

Mike, what's your strike 3 mechanic for a RHB?

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Uhmmm...that's 'wrong' .....

should have had left leg back for lhb

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Working the knee is another story. It can look good or absolutely horrible. I work on my knee on little kids and it's no big deal. I have worked it on occasion when I was injured and couldn't scissor. I say try it but don't make getting up painful or lazy, that's where guys get dinged. Just remember, being on your knee means you have to be more mobile not less.

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As a very long scissor guy, I know all the downsides to the stance.

1. It's unstable.....It is the least stable of the stances but once you learn it, that is no longer true.

2. Puts more stress on your back....Absolutely untrue.

3. Leads to neck injuries by being hit......Possibly true but I know of no single scissor guy to suffer an injury from being hit.

4. Can't clear fast enough.....Absolutely no problem with clearing.

My problems with the stance.....

1. I can't get a good third strike mechanic on LH batters.

2. You have to go down later than in other stances.....I don't have a problem with it but I get dinged by partners as being late.

My particular likes....

1. Easier on my knees.

2. It presents a smaller profile, never had a cup shot.

3. I work a little farther off the catcher.

Huh?

Mike, what's your strike 3 mechanic for a RHB?

I come up, and pull at shoulder height. On a LH batter I can't get my feet right to do what I want. I suspect I need to step to my right.

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As a very long scissor guy, I know all the downsides to the stance.

1. It's unstable.....It is the least stable of the stances but once you learn it, that is no longer true.

2. Puts more stress on your back....Absolutely untrue.

3. Leads to neck injuries by being hit......Possibly true but I know of no single scissor guy to suffer an injury from being hit.

4. Can't clear fast enough.....Absolutely no problem with clearing.

My problems with the stance.....

1. I can't get a good third strike mechanic on LH batters.

2. You have to go down later than in other stances.....I don't have a problem with it but I get dinged by partners as being late.

My particular likes....

1. Easier on my knees.

2. It presents a smaller profile, never had a cup shot.

3. I work a little farther off the catcher.

Huh?

Mike, what's your strike 3 mechanic for a RHB?

I come up, and pull at shoulder height. On a LH batter I can't get my feet right to do what I want. I suspect I need to step to my right.

No, ... just step back ...keep your left foot planted and step back w/ your right and place your right foot behind your left ....fire up that lawnmower! :D

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I am a big guy, 6'6" 285, and have always been intrigued with working on a knee like McClelland. That was always my reason not to, because I had heard it looked lazy. I used it in a 10U tournament I called this summer(I almost always call 14 and up) because I felt like I couldn't get low enough otherwise. I liked it a lot, but haven't done it again since. As someone of my height, would it still be considered taboo?

You tall guys can get a pass using the knee on smaller players as long as you can get up quickly and make your signals and rotations.....the lazy comes from those who stuggle to get up or stay down to signal....... i could never get away with it.....and plus I dont like getting my polywools dirty.......lol

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I work the scissors with no problems. I get a lower than T's pics but am very well at seeing the plate. Plus, I am a little more upright with my chest so the ball hits my CP flush to prevent it from rolling down onto my hands or any other body part. I make for a small target but if I am going to get hit, it is only my CP that gets hit.

My punchout is similar to this guys toward the end of the video.

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Here's my issue with the scissors.

First many guys do it incorrectly.

Next, it places unnecessary stress on the neck/spine and does not give the same concussion protection as the box/heel-toe/slot. Here is how:

If you take a shot to the head being in the scissors stance your neck cannot absorb as much of the impact that it could not being in the scissors.

Here's the example I always give. Sitting at your desk put your elbows on your knees and look up at something eye level across the room like you would if you were looking at a pitcher or a pitch coming in. This puts your neck & back at a similar angle to what it would be in the scissors position. Now, try lifting your head suddenly simulating getting hit with the ball. Notice how much/little range of motion you have.

Now, put your elbows on your upper thigh so that your back is straighter just like if you were in the slot/box stance. Look at something across the room at something at eye-level. Once again lift your head suddenly like you are taking a hit. Notice how much more range of motion you have.

It is that range of motion which can help minimize the chance of concussions and/or neck and spine issues.

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Here's my issue with the scissors.

First many guys do it incorrectly.

Next, it places unnecessary stress on the neck/spine and does not give the same concussion protection as the box/heel-toe/slot. Here is how:

If you take a shot to the head being in the scissors stance your neck cannot absorb as much of the impact that it could not being in the scissors.

Here's the example I always give. Sitting at your desk put your elbows on your knees and look up at something eye level across the room like you would if you were looking at a pitcher or a pitch coming in. This puts your neck & back at a similar angle to what it would be in the scissors position. Now, try lifting your head suddenly simulating getting hit with the ball. Notice how much/little range of motion you have.

Now, put your elbows on your upper thigh so that your back is straighter just like if you were in the slot/box stance. Look at something across the room at something at eye-level. Once again lift your head suddenly like you are taking a hit. Notice how much more range of motion you have.

It is that range of motion which can help minimize the chance of concussions and/or neck and spine issues.

I have been warned about the neck and concussion possibilities with the scissors and I just haven't seen it. I do not know of a single instance of a scissor guy getting a concussion. On the other hand I know many box guys that have had both concussions and neck injuries. I have taken many 90+MPH shots to the face with no ill effect.

I don't teach scissors unless asked. If I have a guy in a cage that scissors I will work with him.

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I'm not sure I buy the concussion argument either. The transfer of force is so quick that I'm not sure any absorbtion effect by neck movement would be effective. Plus, to the extent that there is, if it's quick enough to cause the head to snap or go back and forth, it might actually INCREASE the concussive effects by increasing the back and forth sloshing of the brain. Again, I doubt the velocity is that high, but I don't know enough about the actual physics involved.

I do remember once an online post a few yrs ago from Brad at All-Star (can't remember where I saw it, but can picture the post clear as day) where he said from their research, the whole mask-spinning reducing the force of a hit was mostly a myth - the force from a significant impact is transferred too quickly for the spin to mitigate and most of the hits that cause spins were never dangerous in the first place. Again, certainly could be wrong, but I'm just skeptical that this is a significant factor.

Now the stress on the neck, lower back, and achilles tendon? Totally believe that, from personal experience.

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I use it in LL all the time. It is hard to get down low otherwise, I have tried. I call my look a motified scissor.

And I always stand up straight after every pitch.

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