Jump to content
ncblue

Windup in <acronym title='Federation Rules (High School)'>FED</acronym> vs <acronym title='Official Baseball Rules'>OBR</acronym>

Recommended Posts

I had an interesting debate tonight with fellow umpire concerning windup and pick off moves. I read both sets of rules and the language in FED has me questioning myself. Is there ANYWAY-according to FED- a pitcher can toe the rubber in the windup and throw to any base legally?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had an interesting debate tonight with fellow umpire concerning windup and pick off moves. I read both sets of rules and the language in FED has me questioning myself. Is there ANYWAY-according to FED- a pitcher can toe the rubber in the windup and throw to any base legally?

Yeah, he can disengage with his pivot foot and then throw over...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had an interesting debate tonight with fellow umpire concerning windup and pick off moves. I read both sets of rules and the language in FED has me questioning myself. Is there ANYWAY-according to FED- a pitcher can toe the rubber in the windup and throw to any base legally?

Yeah, he can disengage with his pivot foot and then throw over...

+1 This is the only way

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had an interesting debate tonight with fellow umpire concerning windup and pick off moves. I read both sets of rules and the language in FED has me questioning myself. Is there ANYWAY-according to FED- a pitcher can toe the rubber in the windup and throw to any base legally?

Directly from the rule book (except for anytypos I might make - lol):

With his feet in the wind-up position, the pitcher may only deliver a pitch or step backwards off the pitcher's plate with his pivot foot first.

I dont think it can get any more clearer than that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Therein lies my confusion. I'm trying to familiarize myself with FED rules. I keep seeing in numerous inquiries their is a difference between pitching from the windup in FED vs OBR. In fact, in an earlier thread on this forum, it states "NFHS 6-1-2-It is a balk if a pitcher attempts a pickoff from the windup position."

Forgive me for not completely understanding-but does this mean the pitcher must disengage before throwing? How does this differ from OBR?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Therein lies my confusion. I'm trying to familiarize myself with FED rules. I keep seeing in numerous inquiries their is a difference between pitching from the windup in FED vs OBR. In fact, in an earlier thread on this forum, it states "NFHS 6-1-2-It is a balk if a pitcher attempts a pickoff from the windup position."

Forgive me for not completely understanding-but does this mean the pitcher must disengage before throwing? How does this differ from OBR?

Yes it means he has to disengage before throwing. FED seems really clear on that.

In OBR the pitcher MAY throw to a base from the rubber while in the windup oosition. That's clear in the OBR rules.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I was looking for something that wasn't there-over complicating it. I was being told by a local veteran umpire-who is the "one to ask" concerning rules-that in FED you couldn't throw to base if you were in windup-period. My take originally-was the only way you couldn't was if pitcher was engaged and began movement. He kept telling me differently and I began to doubt and overthink what I was reading. Thanks!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Balked a kid for trying to pick someone off third from the windup without stepping off a couple years ago in a game using FED rules. Ended up restricting the manager for arguing as well. Talk about a rule that you see... never.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's usually the other way around.

A kid picks off from the Windup in an OBR game, and the coach wants a balk.

I am thinking about calling it FEDball to help clarify that HS ball and OBR ball are two different things.

Then again, calling the other sport Softball doesn't seem to keep those rules from creeping in either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...