Jump to content

Call it both ways Blue


soapbox

Recommended Posts

I was working the semis of a 9U Fall Ball game the other day. Local town team against a club team that charges a fortune. Some of the memorable comments to close out the season were:

1. Club teams manager who is losing in the 2nd inning lets me know first that all his parents are idiots and secondly that the team that they would soon go on to lose to stinks and his team is so much better.

2. When I told the club team that they would require a spotter for their F1 warming up on the side during the game, the coach yells to me that I need to call it both ways blue. Now the home team did warm F1 properly an inning earlier, but this is the first time I've been told to call it both ways in the name of safety.

I will give the manager one thing, his parents were rough. I had a fly ball down the right field line where they were all sitting and though it was down the line, it was a ball that not one umpire would consider one of those close ones. About 12" inches fair. The parents were going nuts I didn't make the foul call. They chirped for 5 minutes solid. Nothing I had to stop for, just kind of puts a smile on your face because they were whining like, well, children. By the way, the children certainly act more like adults. Must have been one of those goofy movies where the kids changed places with their parents. Well the next inning on every foul call I got the mock cheering

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 34
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Had one a few years ago....

Top of first inning. There is a pitch that I call a strike that the offensive coach takes exception to.

"C'mon, Blue! You have to call that both ways!"

I'm not usually one for snappy comebacks to whining coaches, but this one is low-hanging fruit!

"Coach, just wait until I have the chance to. Then I will!"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Call it both ways is a phrase that sets my teeth on edge and put you on very thin ice. It isn't always meant this way but to me it says I am cheating. I am going to shut this down quickly and on more than one occasion has caused a manager to have a short day.

Yeah, that's the phrase the makes me pull out my lineup cards, look at either the batter or pitchers uniform number, and call the manager out of the dugout to have a word with him. Then I dig deep for my best Jack Webb-esque monolog.

Joe Friday at his finest

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A top tier high school pitcher at a semi-joke program was batting in the third inning, and I call a low strike, my specialty. He steps out of the box, and, thinking he's not showing me up by not making eye contact, he says, "You better start calling that both ways, Blue."

"Time."

I pull off my mask, put up the that's a warning sign and warn; unsportsmanlike and balls and strikes. I write it down in the style Kyle described, and the head coach wants to know what's going on. I repeated what I said while he wasn't paying attention, and he demanded to know what the kid said. I told him that he could have been ejected, but I'm leaving him in the game with a warning. "We're done here." (I don't repeat what is said in those cases; I just don't think it's dignified, especially if it's profane.)

"You're not even going to tell me what he said?" Then, the player hollers, with indignation, "I told him 'You better start calling that both ways.'"

"Okay, now he's gone."

"WHAT?"

"He's gone; you need a batter to assume number eleven's two-two count."

Like MS Taylor said, it implies that you're being dishonorable. So it's warning or ejection time at the higher levels. I give unofficial warnings too---words to that effect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Call it both ways is a phrase that sets my teeth on edge and put you on very thin ice. It isn't always meant this way but to me it says I am cheating. I am going to shut this down quickly and on more than one occasion has caused a manager to have a short day.

Yeah, that's the phrase the makes me pull out my lineup cards, look at either the batter or pitchers uniform number, and call the manager out of the dugout to have a word with him. Then I dig deep for my best Jack Webb-esque monolog.

Joe Friday at his finest

Classic Dragnet right there. It's amazing how fast he talked without changing inflection. Depending on my mood whether he gets an up close and personal or a very public That's enough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A top tier high school pitcher at a semi-joke program was batting in the third inning, and I call a low strike, my specialty. He steps out of the box, and, thinking he's not showing me up by not making eye contact, he says, "You better start calling that both ways, Blue."

"Time."

I pull off my mask, put up the that's a warning sign and warn; unsportsmanlike and balls and strikes. I write it down in the style Kyle described, and the head coach wants to know what's going on. I repeated what I said while he wasn't paying attention, and he demanded to know what the kid said. I told him that he could have been ejected, but I'm leaving him in the game with a warning. "We're done here." (I don't repeat what is said in those cases; I just don't think it's dignified, especially if it's profane.)

"You're not even going to tell me what he said?" Then, the player hollers, with indignation, "I told him 'You better start calling that both ways.'"

"Okay, now he's gone."

"WHAT?"

"He's gone; you need a batter to assume number eleven's two-two count."

Like MS Taylor said, it implies that you're being dishonorable. So it's warning or ejection time at the higher levels. I give unofficial warnings too---words to that effect.

The manager has a right to know for what his players are being warned/ejected. Pragmatically speaking, as well, the only thing you are doing by not telling him is allowing that player to proclaim to him his innocence, which will lead to more confrontation. Let him know what his players did--if he then wants to fall on that sword, it's his own fault.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The manager has a right to know for what his players are being warned/ejected. Pragmatically speaking, as well, the only thing you are doing by not telling him is allowing that player to proclaim to him his innocence, which will lead to more confrontation. Let him know what his players did--if he then wants to fall on that sword, it's his own fault.

Thank you, but I told him EXACTLY why his player was being warned: unsportsmanlike conduct and arguing balls and strikes. I wasn't too clear about that in my post: I wrote that I repeated what I told the player when I warned him, because the coach wasn't paying attention to it.

But I refuse and will continue to refuse to repeat a player's exact words to a coach for others to hear. Period. It's undignified. That's my belief based on seasoning from years of managing many other things before I managed these many ballgames.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But I refuse and will continue to refuse to repeat a player's exact words to a coach for others to hear. Period. It's undignified. That's my belief based on seasoning from years of managing many other things before I managed these many ballgames.

Wow. That's pomposity at its finest. Do you put exact quotes in your reports?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But I refuse and will continue to refuse to repeat a player's exact words to a coach for others to hear. Period. It's undignified. That's my belief based on seasoning from years of managing many other things before I managed these many ballgames.

Wow. That's pomposity at its finest.

Pomposity is something you seem to grasp quite well, Matt. Except your own.

You go ahead and repeat what a player says to get warned or ejected--especially the profane or demeaning stuff, if you see nothing wrong with it. If that's your style, by all means, be yourself.

I choose to only describe the violation and its category for the public to hear.

Do you put exact quotes in your reports?

Of course. That report is not for public consumption. And it's required.

So that question is either a stupid one, or a smart-assed one. I'm not certain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pomposity is something you seem to grasp quite well, Matt. Except your own.

Just because I'm right...

You go ahead and repeat what a player says to get warned or ejected--especially the profane or demeaning stuff, if you see nothing wrong with it. If that's your style, by all means, be yourself.

I choose to only describe the violation and its category for the public to hear.

The manager is not "the public."

Of course. That report is not for public consumption. And it's required.

So that question is either a stupid one, or a smart-assed one. I'm not certain.

Neither.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pomposity is something you seem to grasp quite well, Matt. Except your own.

Just because I'm right...

You go ahead and repeat what a player says to get warned or ejected--especially the profane or demeaning stuff, if you see nothing wrong with it. If that's your style, by all means, be yourself.

I choose to only describe the violation and its category for the public to hear.

The manager is not "the public."

Of course. That report is not for public consumption. And it's required.

So that question is either a stupid one, or a smart-assed one. I'm not certain.

Neither.

It's the head coach, not the "manager." And games are held in public here, so repeating what some unsportsmanlike player says is said in public. You do that. That's your style.

I am sure you are satisfied with your degree of success in your dealings with "managers."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm with Matt on this one. I have no problem telling the manager what his player said that caused him to get the warning or get run. You don't have to make it a proclamation for the benches and stands to hear, but you can certainly let the manager know the scoop. I'm not sure how giving the manager an honest and straight forward answer is undignified, Kevin.

And I'm ignorant as to what a warning sign is. I don't think I've been taught that mechanic.

Tim.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to tell him if asked. I generally tell the manager that he got tossed for yakking. If he asks what he said, I will cetainly tell him. You can have a low key person to person conversation without broadcasting to the stands. The question about language in you report is a valid question. As somebody that gets the reports, many do not put exact language in their reports.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm with Matt on this one. I have no problem telling the manager what his player said that caused him to get the warning or get run. You don't have to make it a proclamation for the benches and stands to hear, but you can certainly let the manager know the scoop. I'm not sure how giving the manager an honest and straight forward answer is undignified, Kevin.

And I'm ignorant as to what a warning sign is. I don't think I've been taught that mechanic.

Tim.

The warning sign is you staring at the coach with fire in your eyes and smoke out your ears! :censored:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to tell him if asked. I generally tell the manager that he got tossed for yakking. If he asks what he said, I will cetainly tell him. You can have a low key person to person conversation without broadcasting to the stands. The question about language in you report is a valid question. As somebody that gets the reports, many do not put exact language in their reports.

They really shouldn't paraphrase. Well, to the best of their ability. There are times during a rant from player or manager that I will not be able to quote everything that was said, but I will always remember the magic words if that is the case. Are you okay with the paraphrasing? The CCA manual states something to the effect of: "we're all adults, the report should state exactly what was said"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I have now talked to eleven higher level umpires and not one of them repeats to a coach what is said by an ejected or warned player. Describing the violation is enough (unsportsmanlike; profane; personal, etc.) One umpire said that he wouldn't even expect a coach to ask him to repeat it.

Explicit details in the report---absolutely. But repeating word-for-word what the violator said---absolutely not.

It's not dignified, especially if it's profane.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have now talked to eleven higher level umpires and not one of them repeats to a coach what is said by an ejected or warned player. Describing the violation is enough (unsportsmanlike; profane; personal, etc.) One umpire said that he wouldn't even expect a coach to ask him to repeat it.

Explicit details in the report---absolutely. But repeating word-for-word what the violator said---absolutely not.

It's not dignified, especially if it's profane.

And this higher-level umpire does, as well as most others I know. I, too, do not expect a coach to ask--but if he does, he does.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.






×
×
  • Create New...