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Senor Azul

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Everything posted by Senor Azul

  1. From the 2016 BRD (section 326, p. 216): Play 184-326: R1, R2, bottom of the 8th, B1 singles to centerfield, F8’s throw home to get R2 gets by the catcher and is rolling toward the home-team dugout. That team, excited about the run, starts to cheer and rush from the dugout toward home plate to celebrate. A bench player accidentally deflects the ball, and it rolls into the dugout. At the time it entered the dugout, R2 had scored and R1 was advancing home, with the batter-runner heading toward third. Ruling: This action is “unintentional interference,” and since R2 had already touched home plate at the time the ball entered dead-ball territory, his run scores. The umpire calls “Time,” declares out R1, and returns the batter to the last base he had attained before the ball entered dead-ball territory.
  2. Mr. LRZ, your objection is valid for NCAA and OBR but not for Little League or Federation games. When I searched for the answer to this current question I found that you had the same objection in 2015. I did not realize that you have been here that long. Back then you asked for the interpretation for OBR and did not receive it then—so here it is now. 2019 NFHS Case Book Play 3.4.1 Situation B: The coach of the team at bat requests and is granted time so he may have a conference with either the batter or runner(s). Thereafter, if the defensive team's coach goes to the mound to talk to his pitcher, should the defensive team be charged with a conference also? RULING: No. When either team is granted time for a conference the other coach or representative may do likewise without being charged with a conference, unless the opposing coach or his representative delays the game by not being ready to play when the other team's charged conference is completed. From the 2016 BRD (section 159, p. 122): OBR Official Interpretation: Wendelstedt: "A defensive visit is a defensive visit, regardless of other offensive visits that might be occurring and even if it does not delay the game in any way."
  3. I would start with the rule book itself. The 2021 edition is now available online at mlb.com. Check out OBR rules 5.10(l) and 5.10(m). If that doesn’t have what you’re looking for then I would recommend the Minor League Baseball Umpire Manual. I have the 2018 edition—it has nearly four full pages devoted to mound visits.
  4. Admittedly, Mr. beerguy55, I only used one source for that bit of trivia. But to me that one source is impeccable—it’s The Home Run Encyclopedia edited by Bob McConnell and David Vincent of SABR. In its Introduction it categorically states that Babe Ruth never hit a bounce homer. Since the editors have researched and analyzed every home run hit in Major League history from 1876 through 1995, I believe it is a reliable source. Here is some more trivia about the Babe’s home run hitting exploits (regular season records)—he hit 16 grand slams, 98 three-run jacks, 252 two-run shots, and 348 solo homers. He hit two homers in one game 70 times and three homers in a single game twice. And here’s one that surprised me—he actually hit more home runs on the road than he did at home (347 at home versus 367 away).
  5. Mr. agdz59, prior to 1998 FED rule books had some sample plays incorporated into the book. This was in addition to the regular case books. Here’s one of those plays in the 1997 FED rule book— 4-2-2 Play In the home half of the seventh inning or of any extra inning, R3 and R2 when (a) B3 hits and advances to third, or (b) B3 hits an out-of-the-park home run. RULING: In (a) if score was tied, only the score by R3 counts and B3 is credited with a single. In (b) all three runs count, and B3 is credited with a home run. Baseball is scored the same at any level. I gave you the OBR rule because it is the only code that has a full section on how to score. For your reading pleasure here’s the current NCAA rule (rule 10-7)-- Game-Ending Hit SECTION 7. When a batter ends a game with a hit that drives in as many runs as are necessary to win the game, credit him with only as many bases on his hit as the runner who scores the winning run advances, and then only if the batter runs out his hit for as many bases as are advanced by the runner who scores the winning run. Exception—If the batted ball clears an outfield fence in fair territory, the batter shall be credited with a home run.
  6. (I realize you stated it's a local league modification.) Little League has a no head-first slide rule [7.08(a)(4)] and here is what they say about the way to handle it in their Rules Instruction Manual. INSTRUCTOR’S COMMENTS ➔ This rule does not apply when a runner is returning to a base, only when advancing to a base. Any runner who does a headfirst slide is out at the moment the umpire sees the runner go into the headfirst slide. The ball remains live and in play. Other runners may advance at their own risk and plays may be attempted on any other runners. If the runner who is called out for sliding headfirst has been forced to advance this will be a force out and no runs will score if this is the third out of the inning. In all other instances the headfirst slide will be a timing play when there are two outs.
  7. The issue raised about the pitcher not being able to keep his cap on is covered in 2019 case play 10.2.3C— 10.2.3 SITUATION C F1’s cap frequently falls off his head and in the umpire’s judgment, it is either distracting to the batter or delaying the game. RULING: The umpire shall instruct the defensive team’s coach that F1’s cap must be secured. If this situation is not corrected, F1 will be removed as pitcher.
  8. What we today call a ground rule double was by OBR a home run until the 1931 season. And, no, Babe Ruth never had any so-called bounce homers. Prior to the 1920 season a hitter did not receive credit for a home run if the run was not necessary to win the game. The rule was changed in 1920 to allow game-winning out-of-the-park homers and any runners scoring on the hit to count in the final score. The Babe lost at least one homer to this rule.
  9. This is scored as just a single with one run scoring—here is the applicable scoring rule. 2019 OBR rule 9.06(f) Subject to the provisions of Rule 9.06(g), when a batter ends a game with a safe hit that drives in as many runs as are necessary to put his team in the lead, the Official Scorer shall credit such batter with only as many bases on his hit as are advanced by the runner who scores the winning run, and then only if the batter runs out his hit for as many bases as are advanced by the runner who scores the winning run. Rule 9.06(f) Comment: The Official Scorer shall apply this rule even when the batter is theoretically entitled to more bases because of being awarded an “automatic” extra-base hit under various provisions of Rules 5.05 and 5.06(b)(4)…
  10. Senor Azul

    Missed bag

    Nate, what rule set was in effect for your game? You state the coach called for time--so did your umpire actually grant time? If so, exactly when did he grant time? Was there still any possible play? FED: If a batter receives ball four, the umpire shall not grant time until the batter reaches first. (2-4-2; 2.4.2) FED rule 2-4-2: A base on balls is an award of first base (often referred to as a “walk”) if a batter receives four such balls. The batter must (emphasis added) go immediately to first base before time-out is called. FED Case Book Play 2.4.2 SITUATION: B1 receives ball four and he or a teammate or coach of Team A immediately requests time. RULING: The umpire shall ignore the request and order B1 to go to first base, after which a player or coach of Team A may request time. NCAA: Same as FED. (2021-2022 NCAA rule 6-1a Note 2) OBR: Official Interpretation: Wendelstedt: “In theory, an umpire should not grant time until all runners have reached their awarded bases. However, in practice, umpires may grant time when they are certain that no runner is attempting, or going to attempt, to advance beyond his award.” (emphasis added)
  11. According to the online play-by-play, Dallas Baptist had runner Wrobleski at second base during the top of the 7th inning with Jones batting. Jones did get to a 2-1 count (with a sequence of ball, foul ball, ball, ball, strike looking, strike swinging). The play-by-play makes no mention of any kind of controversy during Jones’ at-bat. And, yes, the NCAA did make a change to their rule about batter’s interference by adding a Note to rule 7-11h. A. Benefield doubled to deep center. A. Benefield picked off second. R. Wrobleski singled to left, R. Wrobleski to second on error by left fielder B. Jones struck out swinging. C. Boulware struck out swinging. 2021 and 2022 NCAA Baseball Major Rules Changes 7.11h Note Batter Interference – Dropped Third Strike Clarify interference. Specifically, after a third strike that is not caught by the catcher and the batter-runner clearly hinders the catcher in the catcher’s attempt to field the ball, the batter-runner is out, the ball is dead, and all other runners return to the bases they occupied at the time of the pitch regardless of the number of outs. If the pitched ball deflects off the catcher or umpire and subsequently touches the batter-runner, it is not considered interference unless, in the judgment of the umpire, the batter-runner clearly hinders the catcher in their attempt to field the ball regardless the number of outs. Rationale: To simplify the administration of this rule regardless of number of outs and whether the action is intentional or unintentional. If the batter-runner hinders the catcher in any way on a dropped third strike (e.g., kicks the ball unintentionally hindering the catcher from making the play), time should be called immediately, the batter-runner is out and all runners return to their last legally occupied base, regardless if they were stealing or not.
  12. Mr. Velho, was this the CCS playoff game between Serra of San Mateo and Mitty of San Jose? If so, the final score was 3-0, right? So, was this one of the runs scored or was this runner called out? And isn’t Serra the school that Tom Brady, Barry Bonds, and Greg Gutfeld attended?
  13. 2020 NFHS rule 1-1 ART. 4 . . . At the time of the pitch, all fielders shall be on fair ground except the catcher who shall be in the catcher's box. A fielder is in fair ground when at least one foot is touching fair ground. PENALTY: Illegal pitch. (2-18) 2019 FED Case Book 1.1.4 SITUATION: With R1, (a) F9 cuts in behind R1 for a throw from F1, who is in contact with the pitcher’s plate, and receives a pickoff throw in foul territory; or (b) F3 has one foot in foul territory when he receives a pickoff throw; or (c) F3, in contact with the base, has one foot in foul territory as the throw is received. RULING: Legal in (a), (b), and (c). In (a), since F1 had not committed himself to pitch to the batter, the play is legal. In (a), (b), and (c) F3 is permitted to have a foot in foul territory, even at the time of the pitch. COMMENT: Rule 1-1-4 requires all defensive players except the catcher to be in fair territory at the time of the pitch. By definition and interpretation, at least one foot must be in fair territory to comply with this rule.
  14. Senor Azul

    4th Out?

    Mr. MT73, if you scroll to the bottom of the document you cited you will find the following--This page was last edited on 3 May 2011, at 19:41. So the document you linked to is not current. I think that fact makes your statement true—“Here is something that may add to the confusion.” The Wendelstedt interpretation was in his 2013 manual and is also listed as the current one in the 2016 BRD.
  15. Senor Azul

    4th Out?

    NJ Coach, there have been at least two occasions in the recent past where a major league game had a continuing play net four outs. Gil Imber of Close Call Sports wrote a very good analysis of what he has dubbed false fourth outs. It is titled False Fourth Out - Ball Stays Alive After Third Out and is dated July 25, 2018. Here is part of his conclusion-- “Since the defense leaving the field, the ball being taken out of play, etc. is what usually happens after the third out, it's not too far of a leap to lump in "third out" and "dead ball" together, but, as Rule 5.09(c)'s fourth out illustrates, the ball remains live in the immediate aftermath of the third out. It becomes dead as the result of an action that could potentially occur simultaneously with the third out being recorded, but the act that causes the ball to become dead is not the third out itself.” Here’s the link-- https://www.closecallsports.com/2018/07/false-fourth-out-ball-stays-alive-after.html
  16. From the 2016 BRD (section 578, p. 374): Official Interpretation: Hopkins: A team is wearing “quarterback-style” wristbands “that have defensive plays listed under a Velcro flap. The pitcher has a black wristband down near his glove.” This is legal provided they are not dangerous. If the umpire believes the pitcher’s band is distracting, it would be removed. (Website 2010 #10) SITUATION 10: The visiting team is wearing “quarterback-style” wristbands that have defensive plays listed under a Velcro flap. The pitcher is wearing a black wristband down near his fielding glove. The home coach claims that the wristbands are illegal, and all players must take them off. RULING: Provided the wristbands are not dangerous, they are legal. If the plate umpire judges the wristband worn by the pitcher to be distracting, he would need to remove it. Otherwise, it is legal for the pitcher as well. (1-5-9, 6-2-1f, penalty). Black wristbands are not considered distracting, but brightly colored or custom wristbands probably would be.
  17. Senor Azul

    4th Out?

    You’re absolutely right, Mr. The Man in Blue. Like you I disagree with the concept. So from now on I’m going to ignore all the evidence to the contrary and just go with what U-E guys say. That means I will have to disbelieve the actual announcement the NCAA made in 2014 concerning this interpretation-- NCAA Baseball Playing Rules Interpretations March, 2014 13. 8-5j, A.R. 1—in the situation where the third out is recorded at any base other than first base, no run may score if the fourth out is due to the batter-runner not reaching first base before he has been put out. Example: Two outs, bases loaded, base hit, R3 scores, R2 is thrown out at the plate. B/R has not touched first base due to a leg injury. F2 throws to F3 and the B/R is tagged out. This is a special situation that would fall under the “fourth-out” appeal process and would allow the defense to take any of the last two outs they would choose for the third out. This interpretation is supported by a response from Jim Evans as to how it is interpreted at the professional level.
  18. Senor Azul

    4th Out?

    Well, Mr. LRZ, you must not have followed the link provided by Mr. Jimurray to the very recent thread where I posted this— All of the following can be found in the 2016 BRD (section 3, p. 15) Play 2-3: R3, R2, 2 outs. B1 singles to the outfield but injures himself coming out of the box. He cannot continue. R3 scores easily, but R2 is thrown out at home: 3 outs. The catcher then fires to F3, who tags first in advance of BR. Ruling: In FED/NCAA, cancel R3’s run. In OBR, the run scores, as per OBR official interpretation 4-3… Wendelstedt: Play 2-3 does not qualify to become an apparent (advantageous) fourth out. It is made on a runner who has not yet reached a base, not on one who has missed a base or has not properly tagged up from one. Here’s the official interpretation for FED: Hopkins: If the defense gains a third out during play but the batter-runner has not yet reached first at the time of the out, the defense may play on him at first for an advantageous fourth out. In addition, the 2019-2020 College Baseball Rules Study Guide by George Demetriou states the following… “Also, if the defense gains a third out during play and the batter-runner has not reached first at the time of the out, a fourth out appeal can negate all runs scored on the play.” Play 4-89 With runners on second and third and two out, B1 singles to right, but pulls his groin and cannot advance. R3 scores, but R2 is thrown out at the plate for the third out. Ruling: A fourth out appeal on B1 will cancel the run.
  19. 2020 NFHS Case Book Play 6.2.4 Situation H: R3. There are two outs and B4 has a count of 3-2. While F1 is in motion, B4 requests time-out, which is not granted, and steps out of the box with (a) one foot or (b) both feet. F1 delivers a pitch that sails over F2’s head. B4 advances to first while R3 scores. RULING: In (a) and (b), the run counts. B4 is charged with a strikeout and remains on first base. Since B4 did not intentionally try to cause F1 to balk or throw a wild pitch, the umpire shall not eject him. The ball remains live. (7-3-1 PENALTY) 5.2.1 Situation A: After F1 has started his delivery, B1 steps out of the batter’s box without being granted “Time.” RULING: If F1 delivers a legal pitch, the umpire shall call the pitch a strike regardless of the location. A second strike may be called, if, in the umpire’s judgment, B1 caused unnecessary delay. The ball remains live. Whether time is granted to the batter shall be umpire judgment. 6.2.4 Situation I: R3. F1 starts his pitching motion and B2 requests “Time,” but the umpire does not grant “Time.” B2 steps out of the batter’s box with both feet and (a) F1 delivers a pitch, (b) does not deliver the pitch or (c) throws a wild pitch. RULING: (a) The umpire shall call two strikes on B2, one on the pitch, and one for stepping out of the box. In (b), the umpire shall call a strike on B2 for stepping out of the batter’s box. The balk is nullified. In (c), two strikes shall be called on B2, one on the pitch and one for stepping out. The ball remains live. (7-3-1 PENALTY)
  20. LittleLeague.org FAQs If an umpire determines that a team’s chanting is an attempt to try to cause a balk/illegal pitch, can he/she request the action be halted? Yes. Rule 4.06(c), No manager, coach, or player shall at any time whether from the bench or the playing field, make any move calculated to cause a balk or illegal pitch. The ability for a team to cheer for their batter or runners should not be restricted, unless there is a definite intent to gain an unfair advantage as discussed in Rule 4.06(c). The chanting/cheering must be in good taste and be directed solely at their own team. A good rule of thumb is the chants/cheers may be as loud as the team desires as long as there is no crescendo or shrieking when the pitcher is delivering the pitch. No artificial noise making (i.e.- pounding on buckets, or fences or air horns) is allowed.
  21. Senor Azul

    Usssa baseball

    USSSA OFFICIAL BASEBALL NATIONAL BY-LAWS & RULES Edition Dated: August 1, 2020 7.02.G Teams may play an official game with an eight (8) player line-up. If a team plays with an eight (8) player line-up, an out shall be declared for the ninth (9th) position in the batting line-up each turn at bat. A ninth (9th) player and all subsequent players may be added to the bottom of the batting line-up as soon as they become available. 7.02.H A team may continue a game with a minimum of eight (8) eligible players.
  22. Senor Azul

    Time?

    All of the following can be found in the 2016 BRD (section 3, p. 15)—this is what Mr. Jimurray was referring to… Play 2-3: R3, R2, 2 outs. B1 singles to the outfield but injures himself coming out of the box. He cannot continue. R3 scores easily, but R2 is thrown out at home: 3 outs. The catcher then fires to F3, who tags first in advance of BR. Ruling: In FED/NCAA, cancel R3’s run. In OBR, the run scores, as per OBR official interpretation 4-3… Wendelstedt: Play 2-3 does not qualify to become an apparent (advantageous) fourth out. It is made on a runner who has not yet reached a base, not on one who has missed a base or has not properly tagged up from one. Here’s the official interpretation for FED: Hopkins: If the defense gains a third out during play but the batter-runner has not yet reached first at the time of the out, the defense may play on him at first for an advantageous fourth out.
  23. *Please note that Regional Site and Crew Assignments will be released directly to individual Crews on May 31. Super Regional Site and Crew Assignments will be released directly to individual Crews on June 8. https://www1.arbitersports.com/front/105039/Site/Posts
  24. Under NFHS rules the appeal of a call of “ball” on a half-swing is not automatic—the rule says the plate umpire may ask for help. This is different from NCAA/OBR where an appeal of the call of "ball" must be granted. 2019 FED rule 10-1 ART. 4 . . . Any umpire’s decision which involves judgment, such as whether a hit is fair or foul, whether a pitch is a strike or a ball, or whether a runner is safe or out, is final. But if there is reasonable doubt about some decision being in conflict with the rules, the coach or captain may ask that the correct ruling be made. The umpire making the decision may ask another umpire for information before making a final decision. No umpire shall criticize or interfere with another umpire’s decision unless asked by the one making it. a. The umpire-in-chief sometimes asks for aid from the base umpire when there is a question as to whether a batter’s “half swing” is such as to be called a strike. As an aid in deciding, the umpire may note whether the swing carried the barrel of the bat past the body of the batter, but final decision is based on whether the batter actually struck at the ball.
  25. Mr. SeeingEyeDog, it is a myth now but from 1887 through 1909 there was a rule that a batter-runner was liable to be put out if he turned left after overrunning first base. In 1887 a new rule (in rule 53, subparagraph 9) was introduced that said— If, in over-running First Base, he also attempts to run to Second Base, or after passing the base he turns to his left from the foul line, he shall forfeit such exemption from being put out.
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