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mrumpiresir

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Posts posted by mrumpiresir

  1. I'd call it this way:

    Murphy is out for being tagged while off 2B and ineligible to occupy 3B because Tejada had not yet acquired the next base nor was he put out.

    Tejada is out for being tagged off 3B.

    If Tejada was tagged out first, Murphy would be safe.  

    ​I think you would be wrong. If Murphy is tagged while touching 3rd base while Tejada is off the bag, Murphy would not be out.  

  2. Ball is farther away than a step and a reach. F3 is no longer in the act of fielding the ball when contact is made. RLI doesn't apply (contrary to what MKE's idiot commentary guy thinks). Please explain.

    ​Gotta disagree.  Ball was definitely within a step and a reach so fielder was still in the act of fielding the ball and is protected. Interference is the correct call.  Running lane has nothing to do with this call.

  3. If there is a runner at 1st  the drop 3rd strike rule not apply If there is less then 2 outs.  I would call time if the throw was made and the runners remain where they are and batters out.

    ​The responsibility for knowing the situation is totally on the defense.  

    Calling time here would be the wrong thing to do.  Let the play continue. 

  4. So would the offense have a choice in the first scenario....R1 and R3...or score R3 and leave batter in the box with a bruise?

    ​No.  Offensive team does not have an option in this scenario.

    There is an option when a doctored baseball is delivered by the pitcher.  See 6.02(c)  2 through 7

  5. Also you should know that when a runner is forced to advance it does not matter if he or the advance base is tagged, it would still be a force. 

    Many years ago I had runners on first and second with two out.  The batter hit a ground ball to the shortstop but for some reason the defense got the runner from second in a run down.  I have no idea why they didn't throw to third for the force out.

    While this is happening the runner from third touches home plate, then they finally tag the runner out.

    The run does not count. R2 was forced to advance because the batter became a runner, thus a force out.  No run can score.

    • Like 1
  6. 7.05 Each runner including the batter-runner may, without liability to be put out, advance—

    (c) Three bases, if a fielder deliberately throws his glove at and touches a fair ball. The
    ball is in play and the batter may advance to home base at his peril;

    Before I looked up the rule I was thinking it addressed a batted ball, but it says fair ball. 

    If he intentionally threw his glove and hit the ball, it should be a three base award. The deflection is irrelevant.

  7.  

    Honest question....does the rule book specifically state the step towards a base must be with the "free foot"?  I read through the balk rules and I didn't see it. 

     

    8.01 COMMENT indicates that disengaging must be done with the pivot foot. By implication, stepping and throwing is done with the free foot. FED 6-1-3 explicitly states that stepping and throwing/feinting must be done with the non-pivot foot.

     

     

    Whatever happened to the requirement to step ahead of the throw with the free foot?  I thought it was a balk.

     

    It's still there. Dickey was disengaging and throwing, not stepping and throwing.

     

    Ok I see.  I looked at the video again and it does appear he legally disengaged first.

  8. Good advice mrumpiresir, thank you.  I'll focus on player names next time.  Now that I think of it, in Little League, you can have multiple players with the same jersey number.  Oh, wouldn't that have been a mess.

     

    There had been a BOO situation, but it had occurred earlier in the inning. 

    True confession time, this was an 8u regular season LL game.  The adults were soooo serious.

    Also note that the adults you refer to in an 8u LL game do not have the slightest idea of the rules to the game.  I could entertain you for hours with the idiotic things i have heard from the parents in youth ball games.  Your best course of action is to not hear what they say because they don't exist.

  9. Because, Jeff (@Thunderheads), in college ball and up (especially Minors and Majors), the BR should be hyper-conscious as to which direction he turns in his overrun of 1B.

    Why should the runner be "hyper conscious" about which way he turns when we all know turning left is not an attempt to advance?  Hopefully at upper levels, (NCAA, PRO), the officials know this and will call it correctly.

  10.  

    Here is the report I sent.  How can I make it better next time?  In the real report, I used manager names.
     
    ---------------
    During the bottom of the first inning VHC was granted a time out and questioned the order of HT batters during that half inning.
    At the moment time was granted, player #42 was in the batters box and had received one pitch (a strike).
    The prior batter had reached 1st base safely and was standing on the base.  I confirmed that the player on first base wore jersey number 27.
     
    My lineup card showed that #42 was the proper batter to follow #27.
     
    All the above facts were verified with the VHC when he questioned the BOO situation and again when he informed me of his desire to protest the game.
     
    Per 2015 LL rule 6.07©, the first pitch to #42, legalized player #27.  Since player #27 was made proper by the first pitch to player #42, I determined, per the official line-up card in my possession, that the next proper batter was at that moment player #42.  The same player that was in the batters box.  I assessed no penalties, and explained my reasoning to VHC.
     
    Before play resumed, VHC informed me of his desire to protest the game.  At that time, VHC and I reviewed the game situation, the positions and numbers of the players on base and at bat, and we reviewed my line-up card.  We agreed that my notes reflected the current game situation.  We made our way to the home team scorekeeper and I informed her that the game would be continued under protest and asked her to note the protest in the official score book for the game.
     
    The game ended after 5.5 innings played.  Home team was leading and did not bat in the bottom of the sixth.  
     
    See attached photo of HT line-up card.

     

    Sounds as if you were correct.  But you should know that the name of the player is what counts, not the number.  In other words if Jones, wearing number 42, is due up but the lineup card shows Jones is  24 instead of 42, the only thing we need to do is correct the lineup card and move on.  The correct batter by name was at bat and that's all that matters.

  11.  

     

    1 base on the overthrow!  :wave:

    I hope you are kidding.

     

    Thought it'd be obvious.  My bad!

     

    No problem.  It just confused me to see a response from an umpire I know to be knowledgeable post an incorrect answer.

  12. Both can re-enter. All starters have re-entry privileges, and all re-entries must occur in the same spot in the batting order. Being that the role of the DH was eliminated with the new batter, only one of the starters can be in the lineup at a time from here on out.

    The role of the DH is terminated when the DH plays defense or the player he is batting for plays offense. The new batter could simply be a substitute for the DH and would not terminate the role of the DH.

  13. Last night was my first time on the field as an ump.  A 10-veteran was my partner and I did the first game (freshmen) on the bases and the second (JV) at the plate.  It'll take a while to get comfortable with all the mechanics, and overall my partner told me I did pretty well.  He suggested watching my low strike call because I called a couple that were too low, and I know I could have been a little more generous with the outside corner (that'll take some getting used to, as well as adjusting to properly see based on where the catcher sets up).  I also know I need to get out from behind the plate faster, although nobody complained about it.  So I popped my cherry and have a bunch more scrimmages to get through in the next two weeks before tournaments begin.  I had a great partner who was very interested in my development and the games were tame enough that I could concentrate on the basics.  Drinking from a fire hose and getting real, real introspective.

    My experience with new umpires is that they tend to call low strikes, sometimes pitches that are in the dirt.  I believe this is caused by not tracking the pitch all the way into the catcher's mitt.  

     

    I suggest you concentrate on this and see if your strike zone improves.

  14. What was the pitchers intention? If his intentions were to deceive the runner, I have a balk. 

    As stated by others, it is the pitchers job to deceive the runner.  Deception is legal unless he violates one of the pitching rules.

     

    In other words, if you call a balk, you had better be able to state which rule was violated.  Telling a coach the balk was called because the pitcher deceived the runner will seriously impact your ability to move up to higher quality of games.

    • Like 1
  15. I'm with noumpere .   I'm surprised we have three pages on this.

     

     A batted ball that goes sharp and direct to the catcher's hand or mitt and is held is a foul tip.

     

    A batted ball that goes sharp and direct to the catcher's hand and pops out but is subsequently held, even if it rebounds off the mask, is a foul tip.

     

    A batted ball that goes sharp and direct and hits the catcher anywhere besides his hand or mitt is a foul ball and immediately dead of course.

     

    I guess if the players are eight years old this could happen. Doesn't really happen with big boy ball.

  16. I've heard of this.  It's a misconception.  The PU has the official line up and it is to be followed throughout the game.  BOO does not change the order.

     

    A couple of years ago I had a disagreement with two umpires at CDP  who insisted the coach gets an option on whether to take the penalty for a balk or the result of the play.  They walked away when I pulled out a rulebook to prove them wrong.   Where does this crap come from?

  17.  

     

    2.00 A BASE is one of four points which must be touched by a runner in order to score a run; more usually applied to the canvas bags and the rubber plate which mark the base points.

     

    Including in the rules. Does a runner have to touch the base point or the bag to be safe?  Same definition here.

    Thanks for the answer Rich.  That certainly sounds reasonable.

     

    Why in the world does the rulebook include "bounds to the outfield"?   If I had my way, I would revise this to be more in line with the way it is called.  "A batted bounding ball that crosses over any portion of first or third base is a fair ball".

     

     

    It's the outfield because it's beyond the infield. Where does it say it has to be the fair part of it?

     

    It's not in the outfield if it crosses the bag and leaves the infield perpendicular to baseline and ends up in foul territory.

     

     

    A FAIR BALL is a batted ball that settles on fair ground between home and first
    base, or between home and third base, or that is on or over fair territory when bounding to
    the outfield past first or third base, or that touches first, second or third base, or that first
    falls on fair territory on or beyond first base or third base, or that, while on or over fair territory
    touches the person of an umpire or player, or that, while over fair territory, passes
    out of the playing field in flight.
     
    I was hoping you would chime in because I know you tend to be a literal interpreter of the rules.
    I understand your previous post concerning the point of the base being pretty much the same as the bag. 
     
    In the OP. I was trying to make it clear that the ball never reached the outfield.
  18. 2.00 A BASE is one of four points which must be touched by a runner in order to score a run; more usually applied to the canvas bags and the rubber plate which mark the base points.

     

    Including in the rules. Does a runner have to touch the base point or the bag to be safe?  Same definition here.

    Thanks for the answer Rich.  That certainly sounds reasonable.

     

    Why in the world does the rulebook include "bounds to the outfield"?   If I had my way, I would revise this to be more in line with the way it is called.  "A batted bounding ball that crosses over any portion of first or third base is a fair ball".

  19.  

     

    Once a bounding ball touches the base or breaks the front plane of the base it is a fair ball.

    Too many errors in the rule book. We cannot enforce by the "literal" written rule.

    I agree with you 100%, That's the way it is called and should be called.  I was just wondering if this had been discussed before and what thoughts others have on this.

     

     

    My thought is that it's not worth much thought nor discussion. We know the book is flawed, so pointing this out isn't terribly interesting or new.

     

    I was not aware that this error in the book was well known.  Just trying to start a discussion on something I found odd, and  because I find myself with too much time on my hands.

  20. Once a bounding ball touches the base or breaks the front plane of the base it is a fair ball.

    Too many errors in the rule book. We cannot enforce by the "literal" written rule.

    I agree with you 100%, That's the way it is called and should be called.  I was just wondering if this had been discussed before and what thoughts others have on this.

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