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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/23/2021 in Posts

  1. Here's a question no one ever seems to talk about with robot umps: who sets that rectangle? Seems the logical end state is somewhat akin to where whiffle ball (and it's cousin blitz ball) have ended up
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  2. Just dropped you payment for the Adidas frame and All-Star harness. Thanks.
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  3. I know this won't happen, but get rid of that stupid rectangle we see on tv. I hate that.
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  4. Great on your CC and congrats to you. Here is some advice I give to guys when working the plate in a "big game" (that is, when they are in the situation you were in). I've posted this elsewhere, but I'll rehash it here. The key to getting relaxed on the plate (when you're really nervous) is to get the game into a defensive flow. Baseball is the only major American sport which is designed to be in a defensive flow. Think about it: it is the only sport in which the defense possesses the ball. Everyone wants the batters swinging, the ball being put in play, and the defense making plays. When those things are happening, the managers/coaches do not have time to waste yelling at you as they're too busy thinking ahead about their next possible coaching move because the game is moving along at a good pace. So, how does one get the game in a good defensive flow? Usually, at the beginning of the game the first pitch that you have to judge (a pitch where the batter does not swing) is an easy call. Usually the pitcher is so jacked up that he either throws an obvious "ball" or he takes a lot off his velocity and throws a "down-the-middle" strike to calm his nerves. HOWEVER, at some point (usually in the first inning) you're going to get that first "nut-cutter" pitch of the game. This is a pitch that is borderline and could go either way. THE FIRST TIME YOU GET A "NUT CUTTER" PITCH YOU HAVE TO CALL IT A "STRIKE". If you can do that...if you can go onto the field with the mentality that you're going to call the very first borderline pitch you see a "strike"...it sends a message to everyone that you're calling strikes. (And trust me, everyone gets the message.) No one is going to argue with you at this point because (1) the game has just begun and (2) they're trying to figure out your zone and, thus, are not going to complain that you're being inconsistent. By calling this very first borderline pitch a "strike" you let both dugouts know that you're not planning on having a "walk-a-thon". Furthermore, (even if subconsciously) you're telling them and yourself that you are not going to squeeze the zone just because you're nervous. Where plate umpires go wrong when they're nervous is that they allow their nerves to affect their judgment (that's human nature). Unfortunately, it is my experience that the vast majority of umpires who are really nervous end up "squeezing" the zone. And, of course, this is the exact opposite of what you want to do in a "big game". What you want to do in a "big game" is get the game in a defensive flow so that the game has a good pace and everyone is focused on the game (and not you). Call the first nut-cutter a strike, and everything settles in from there. If you can do that, in 98% of these games your nerves will be gone by the second inning. [The other 2% are games where the pitchers themselves cannot overcome their own nerves and the game turns into a walk fest...but at least that has nothing to do with you!] My mantra coming out of the locker room in these games: CALL THE FIRST NUT-CUTTER A STRIKE!!!
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