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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/24/2021 in all areas

  1. Black mask, silver pads…blue visor
    1 point
  2. This has nearly turned into "Queer eye for the straight guy" material when it comes to do's and don'ts for what to wear while at the plate. 🤣
    1 point
  3. The AL pledge DOES matter at the national tournament level (regionals and world series). Trust me, I have spent a lot of time working those tournaments (6 regionals; 4 World Series) to have spent a lot of time talking and getting to know the national Legion Baseball staff. They are well aware of that pledge, they take it seriously, and they tell all the game participants at the beginning of the tournament that if you violate the pledge and get ejected...you are going home. I have never, ever received anything but support from the national legion staff when I have had an ejection in a national tournament. I also watched two teams have some players get into a fight (I was not umpiring this particular game) during a game at a regional tournament. Both teams were given approximately 2 hours to have their hotel rooms emptied and be on their respective buses. They were immediately kicked out of the tournament and sent home. Their entire season (which up to that moment included dreams of going to the World Series) immediately came to an unceremonious end. So, please don't say that the Legion pledge doesn't matter. It may not matter with the local Legion officials where you're located. But, it does matter to a whole lot of Legionnaires. And I can assure you (again, having worked 4 World Series) the teams that come from these areas where sportsmanship is lacking...quickly understand that the pledge matters as soon as they get to Shelby.
    1 point
  4. From the 2021 Minor League Baseball Umpire Manual (section 5.47, pp. 74-75): Play 13: Runner on first, no outs, hit-and-run. Batter hits a line drive which strikes the pitcher in the back, flies into the air and is caught by the third baseman for an out. The runner on first is nearly to second base when the ball is caught. The third baseman throws to first, attempting to double the runner off first base; however, his throw is wild and goes into the stands. At the time of the throw, the runner from first has not quite reached second base. When the ball goes out of play, the runner from first has rounded second base (touching second as he rounded it) and is several steps towards shortstop. j. Doesn’t the act of the third baseman throwing the ball out of play nullify a succeeding appeal attempt? That is, hasn’t the defense erred on its first attempt to appeal? Ruling: No. The wild throw by the third baseman is part of the continuous action created by the batter hitting the ball and does not nullify a subsequent appeal after the continuous action has ended.
    1 point
  5. I can second that as well. I have these in both navy and black. Perfect match to Smitty shirts too - which is a plus.
    1 point
  6. I honestly was not answering the OP I was comparing to the previous poster
    1 point
  7. While I can't find any better cite in my 2013 or 2017 MLBUM I did find this verbiage in a 2012 PBUC: "6.2 APPEAL PLAYS Keep the following points in mind regarding appeal plays: 1..... 2..... 3. If the pitcher or any member of the defensive team throws the ball out of play when making an appeal, such act shall be considered an attempted play. No further appeal will be allowed on any runner at any base. (this refers to an appeal being made after a definite break in action.)" The above #3 seems to imply that if there is no definite break in action, a live action throw out of play, a further appeal can be made.
    1 point
  8. If you have a local league that you can work with one guy and never have a problem, all the more power to you. In general, my thought is it sounds like a problem when you can't find umpires. It sounds like a problem when the number one reason is 'umpires are sick of the treatment they get.' Sounds like a problem that wasn't caused by umpires. Sounds like a problem that isn't an umpire's problem. Sounds like a problem that somebody should work on a good solution to. As umpires, our contributions to that solution are: to not put up with the treatment (from fans to TDs) ... this means things that may seem small like speaking up to combat the abusive culture against umpires. On another forum I read, a member posted about the Olympic softball games, but his thread title was something like "Team USA and an umpire who doesn't know what an out is." His actual post wasn't hostile at all, but the title was. Speak up when you see these unconscious/subconscious microaggressions. The person may not even know they are doing it, so be kind, but call attention to it as a major part of the problem. to promote/demand better working conditions. That means not encouraging the expectation that "We pissed off six other guys, so you should come put up with us by yourself." Yeah, that means you may turn down a game check or that Little Johnny has to have a game rescheduled because the adults can't behave. It also means that associations (and I see this more in softball as baseball is not as top-down here) may have to stop sanctioning 6 tournaments all within a hundred-mile radius of one another on the same weekend. then, we as umpires can begin rebuilding the umpire pool. In one of my previous lives I was a "clean up guy" for many retail establishments. When a manager and company had run a store into the ground, they sent me in to fix it. At one particular grueling assignment (a video store), one of the recommendations I made to upper management was: you need to get rid of 1/3rd to 1/2 of your customers at this store. This recommendation was based in several factors, but chief among them was that a significant portion of the customer base was toxic. They came into the store and treated the staff and other customers like dirt, and this culture had taken hold and was growing like a cancer. Upper management had a cow ... "but, paying customers!" You know what happens when you cut that cancer out? The rest of your customer base flourishes. They spend more money. They have a better experience. They promote your business. As I said, upper management had a cow ... we did it ... it worked. Shed the toxic customer base to improve the experience for the rest. I would bet for every tournament where the TD "lets a coach back in" or doesn't take care of a fan situation because he doesn't want to lose their money, he is losing money from at least one other team who won't be back because of how the tournament went. I used to have that same romantic sense of duty that all games must be umpired "for the kids!" Fact is ... no ... no they don't. It isn't feasible to continue to expect people to go out in dangerous (referring to multiple games played in extreme weather conditions) and hostile (referring to "those" games) working conditions and claim it is "for the kids" when it is not about the kids ... it's about money (and we aren't even really balking much about our end of that). If it was about the kids, we wouldn't be having this conversation EVER.
    1 point
  9. It must suck to go through life scared of "what if's". Sincerely hope if I'm on the side of the road fighting for my life, you're not the guy driving by. If your kid wife or family member is drowning, I'm going in the water, no matter the consequences, to try to save your the life of your loved one. If your wife child or loved one is being attacked, I'm helping however I can, no matter the consequences. Just my 2 cents...
    1 point
  10. This may be a controversial take ... but that's easy to say when you are the guy getting a free extra hour for your money instead of working a pointless extra hour for no money. I agree with you that an umpire shouldn't lie about the time. One second? Sorry man, most of the time I'm telling you "game over." In my experience, the games that run over rarely do so because they are a good game that went extra innings. I won't say never. However, in my experience, easily 90% of games that run over do so because they are a blowout with the "wrong home team" and that team didn't manage to push across the last run to kill it or prevent a meaningless run that extended it. I would say that umpires should manage the clock better. That plate is a little dirty and you should probably double check the count with your partner, just to make sure. If you consider that screwing you out of time, sorry. I have a very hard time with coaches who think the time only matters in those final seconds. How much time did you waste arguing? Between innings when you thought you needed your whole team to meet outside the dugout? Trying to figure out your courtesy runner? Not warming up your pitcher while your catcher is getting dressed? What about when we started the clock immediately after the plate meeting and you took 5 minutes to get your team on the field? Yeah, I screwed your team out of time that you paid for. I will agree with you on drop dead times though. I think we covered that recently here. I know many people have an issue with it due to the tradition of the game, but that went out the window when you introduced the clock. Two things I favor in tournaments: drop dead time and drop dead run rule (meaning if the visiting team puts you down by the run rule, no, you don't get another at bat).
    1 point
  11. Wow...just wow. In your world every umpire should go for help to all his partners to make sure every judgment call has a consensus. Umpires don't go to other umpires just to get a second opinion...they're validating that the other umpire saw something the umpire who made the call didn't see (eg. foot pulled from bag). That's why they don't always go to their partner for help, nor should they. If an umpire sees everything he needs to see to make his judgment there is ZERO reason to go to another umpire (whether that judgment is right or not is irrelevant - it's his call to make)...that goes for swings, fair balls and safe/out calls. Should the home plate umpire ask the second base umpire if the pitch was in the strike zone?? If an umpire sees a swing, he's seen what he needs to see. There's NEVER a reason to get help on that. Otherwise you're just creating a culture that encourages shopping for calls. Even if you did allow the time-wasting exercise of appealing swing calls, the umpire would simply refuse your appeal - like he can do on any other request to get assistance. If he didn't see a swing, there may be many reasons for that, so the help is appropriate. You either understand the difference, or you don't. it's not complicated.
    1 point




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