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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/19/2021 in all areas

  1. How about the head coaches spin with their foreheads on a bat and then see which one makes it the farthest to first base before falling down?
    3 points
  2. I used a silver dollar from 1883. I found that most of the participants were uninterested in history. After that I carry a variety of "challenge" coins; heads/tails baseball; zebra tail/head(from my football days);ASA national school. I have found that participants continue to be unimpressed with my coinage.
    2 points
  3. Meh. I just flip my indicator. Numbers-side up is heads. If it looks "unprofessional", not my call - the "professional" thing to do would be to have home and away sorted out before I get to the field.
    2 points
  4. Just me being elitist. It looks unprofessional. Tossing a penny or a dime into the dirt looks like you were unprepared and were fortunate enough to find a coin on the way to the field. Get a flipping coin. Get one that makes a good conversation piece, but is easy to see. It shows you care enough to be prepared and properly equipped for the game. It makes the coin toss easy (instead of digging through powdery dirt to see if you have Roosevelt or torches). Besides, a fun story or joke related to the coin makes you personable and approachable. All part of the first impression. To tie this back to ball bags ... You wouldn't run your belt through the handles of plastic grocery bags to make ball bags, would you? So quit using currency for coin tosses.
    2 points
  5. Hey guys, I have a deep, dark secret that I need to let you in on. I know you may have heard rumblings about this in the past, and probably some wild conspiracy theories. Please, please, PLEASE do not share this outside this room ... ... Major League Baseball is a for-profit business. And ...
    2 points
  6. I was the plate umpire. Runners on 1st and 3rd, two outs. The at-bat was nothing to write about, but I called "ball four" on a pitch and the runner trotted off to first. The runner on 3rd thought the bases were loaded, so he began trotting home and no one said anything to stop him. The catcher just held onto the ball without throwing it back to the pitcher, and waited. Realizing what was happening, I took off my mask and adjusted my positioning to get into the "wedge" to make the call. The runner didn't notice any of this, and his team left him hanging -- they didn't say a single word to get him back on the base. When he was a few feet from the plate, the catcher jumped out and tagged him. "He's OUT!" I signaled. The runner just stood there looking confused while the defense left the field to begin their turn at bat until someone finally told him, "There was no one on second."
    1 point
  7. … I just can’t believe we’re talking about flipping coins here…😩😩
    1 point
  8. I'm not gonna lie ..... Gary's makes the best gavel in the biz. They've got the right heft, and produce the best sounds of any in the game.
    1 point
  9. For the blue part: I'll *still* holler "Coaches!" because that gets me two dudes up to the plate. Are they coaches? Are they managers? Are they babysitters? Who gives a SH*#? For MY time and money, they're two dudes who can speak to the few issues we need to talk about at a plate meeting - time/innings, ruleset, paying my ass, ground rules. Speaking of that plate meeting, for the green part: I hate, hate, HATE that part of a plate meeting - and it only happens if a partner decides to give that speech, 'cause *I* won't. They should know; if they DON'T know, they'll find out in a hurry when the time comes. Even when it's a kid's house league, and it's dads doing the coaching, I refuse to give that talk.
    1 point
  10. You looked up what FTX was. Now you have exposure to it that you didn't before.
    1 point
  11. The runner gets third, as aaluck said. Here's why. The adage about base awards is "one from the rubber [ie, the pitcher in contact with the rubber], two from the field." Then the question becomes from the time of the pitch or time of the throw. In the OP, there is no pitch, so the award is time of throw, here from secondbaseman to firstbaseman. Also note that the award is two bases from the base legally occupied at the time of the throw [ie, first], not "one in the direction he's running [ie, back to first], then a second base awarded forward." We disposed of that myth for baseball in a thread several days ago.
    1 point
  12. a blue visor on a black mask w/ gray pads is great when you still have to wear Navy!
    1 point
  13. Because it makes contact with your face, this is the only product I’ve ever used, offer, and recommend to others: If I’m saving leather pads for an extended amount of time, I clean them one last time (with this), let them dry for one day, and then place them in a food-safe zip-lock bag.
    1 point
  14. MLB...they seldom miss an opportunity...to miss an opportunity. ~Dawg
    1 point
  15. Beyond the apparel logos* there shouldn't be anything commercial associated with game officials. Yes, I know that's not going to happen per TMIB above. * I'd rather not but that's a line I can get my head around. I dislike logos to the point I strip everything off my cars (within reason). The model level markings are all gone for example.
    1 point
  16. Yes, but don't split hairs on this I should edit this: By rule the pivot foot needs to land before the motion to throw begins. in practice, we balk it only if the foot hasn't landed by the time the throw is released or if the arm motion begins before the foot motion.
    1 point
  17. Ordered… should be on my mask by Wed…blue the only color offered.
    1 point
  18. 6.01 Interference, Obstruction, and Catcher Collisions (a) Batter or Runner Interference It is interference by a batter a runner when: (4)Any member or members of the offensive team stand or gather around any base to which a runner is advancing, to confuse, hinder or add to the difficulty of the fielders. Such runner shall be declared out for the interference of his teammate or teammates; I suppose you could use that one, but I don't think it is the right one. Using that, there is no infraction until the on-deck batter got there and the collision happened. By that point, the runner had already crossed the plate and no runner was advancing to the plate ... no interference. As a coach, I would make the argument that he didn't "confuse, hinder, or add to the difficulty" as the runner had crossed the plate and nobody else was coming home ... he went up to get the bat. With 6.01(b) Fielder Right of Way none of that matters as the infraction occurs while the catcher is attempting to field a thrown ball. I'm not sure I am conveying what I am getting at since the time element is not explicit, but it is there. Or maybe I am wrong. 😜 This is just an exercise in rule-interpretation as the penalty will be the same either way if you choose to apply it ... you are still going to get the same runner on the out either way. Now you need to figure out which runner.
    1 point
  19. And from the LL Rules Instruction Manual following Rule 9.01(d)... INSTRUCTOR'S COMMENTS: Keep in mind that the unsportsmanlike conduct or language could exist toward an umpire, the opposing team, and even a member of the same team. Do not allow bad behavior to continue, even if it's not directed at you.
    1 point
  20. I'm just like sex... in and out very quickly!
    1 point
  21. There is a lot of very useful feedback here and I appreciate it. If I might, please allow me to provide a little more color on what was going on, and what happened after, I talked to the fence. I am risking digging my hole even deeper than it already is, but giving the metrics you are providing in the recent posts here, I think I might be OK. My partner that weekend is someone who has been an umpire in these parts for years and has a deserved reputation for being hard to work with. He's been banned from different tournaments and assignors use him as a last resort because they are tired of dealing with angry coaches, parents and partners. That weekend, the tournament organizer was a fellow umpire who gave my partner work because, as he admitted to me, he wanted to give him another chance. Frankly, he had me work with him because I said I was willing. Saturday was typical. Balkfests at 12U for the slightest infraction, bizarre conversations at plate meetings and engaging coaches on trivialities that only served to piss them off. So early Sunday with that close play at first and I hear the grumbling behind me, I made the decision to try to ease the tension with my remark. That's the context. I do not typically talk to the fence at all. So what was the result with my assignor for that tournament? He called me Sunday night to thank me for helping keep things on our field under control. That he had heard from many people on both sides of the fence that appreciated my efforts. And, as I've seen other times, one coach told him that if my partner was going to be at the tournament next year, he would not be bringing his team. We ended by talking about how to improve the tournament next year. This last weekend I worked another tournament where two coaches talked to me personally and thanked me for how I handled things there. So, from the feedback I have received from assignors and coaches, I think I made an ok decision given the circumstances. Again, I appreciate the feedback I've gotten here. You guys are awesome, really.
    1 point
  22. Somewhere in the attic is my stash of Elbeco button-down shirts.
    1 point
  23. Not that anyone asked, here's my two cents (both as an umpire who was nicknamed "Mr. Red Ass" by his classmates at umpire school and as an assignor of high school umpires). 1. There are not enough ejections in amateur baseball. I get very tired of a lot of umpires complaining about the behavior of coaches (and my umpires (that I assign) will complain to me about coaches all year long), but then when a coach commits a serious transgression in a game they don't eject him. When I ask why they didn't eject, they then give me excuses such as "I didn't want to write a report," or "it was late in the game and I just wanted to get out of there," etc., etc., etc. Frankly, it really ticks me off as an assignor. For example, this year alone, I saw a player spike his helmet in disgust at an umpire's call on a play at the plate and multiple high school coaches leave their dugout and come toward home plate yelling at the plate umpire about balls and strikes...and not a darn thing was done to any of them. We as umpires cannot complain about game participants behavior if we're going to tolerate it. There are a lot of us who need to take care of business when faced with unsporting behavior, or otherwise stop complaining about it. 2. Unless the game participant engages in conduct that deserves an immediate ejection without warning (for instance, if the first words out of a coach's mouth is, "you're F*#King horrible!"), I tell my guys, "to get your warning in." For instance, if a coach is arguing balls and strikes (without using any magic words) we don't want to eject without having first warned (and restricted in high school). 3. Outside of professional baseball, we need to use the word "warning" when giving the warning. In pro baseball, extending one's arm, holding out the palm of one's hand toward the offender, and saying "that's enough!" is sufficient to constitute a warning. In amateur baseball, we must use the word "warning" (this is even in Rule 2 of the NCAA rulebook). I tell my guys to say, "This is your warning. If you continue to argue you are going to be restricted and/or ejected." It is a simple enough statement to memorize, and, furthermore, this language is unmistakable when issued to a coach/player. I have never had our state association overturn an ejection after such a warning was given to a coach. Their position is that once such a warning is given, the coach should stop talking completely or risk being ejected...even if they end up being ejected for something that may not have been "ejection worthy" had a warning not been previously issued. In other words, when a coach complains to the state that he didn't say anything worthy of being ejected, the state comes back and tells the coach "you were warned and restricted which means you should have stopped talking completely or you risk being ejected, period." And I LOVE my state association for taking this position. They simply will not "overturn" an ejection if the game participant had been warned. 4. Warnings work. Especially higher up in amateur baseball. In fact, most times an NCAA head coach just wants to have his complaints acknowledged...he's not aiming to be ejected. This is a true story: I was working a Division 1 game on the plate. Frankly, I was having a very good balls-and-strikes game, but the home team was getting hammered late in the game. In the bottom of the 8th, the head coach decided to go down the far end of the dugout and start yelling at my partner at first base complaining that the other team's pitcher was balking. He kept going and going and going...and my partner wouldn't do anything. Frankly, I was becoming very annoyed (he was ruining my rhythm!), but I wasn't going to do anything about it because (1) I wasn't the crew chief and (2) my partner was a Division 1 umpire who needs to handle his own crap if he's working at that level. Anyways, the head coach finally came down to the home plate end of the dugout and yelled out at me, "there's nothing stopping you from calling it!". I was soooooo happy that he did that. I promptly took off my mask, looked at him and said, "this is your warning. If you continue to argue you are going to be ejected!". He looked at me, threw up his hands, and said "thank you!" He then sat down and never said another word the rest of the day. The moral of the story was he just wanted to know that his complaints were being heard and acknowledged. This type of reaction from an NCAA head coach happened multiple times during my career. I had a Division 2 head coach who almost always complimented me after a game. But, he could NEVER get through a game without having to receive a balls and strikes warning. I'd give him the warning, he'd crack a smile and give me a little wave from the dugout, and on we went. And, usually, after each game he'd go out of his way to say "good job" (or something similar) as I was leaving the field. He just honestly believed that each game he had to make sure that the umpires knew he was watching them. It became quite humorous. Well, I guess that's more than two cents. Oh, and for the love of God...call the inside strike. It will speed up your games significantly and you will score very highly on an evaluation if you are being evaluated by someone who knows what they're doing.
    1 point




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