Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/27/2021 in Posts

  1. A local kid that I've watched grow up from behind the plate has invited me to be with him and his parents at his college signing day. He said I was behind the plate for so many of his games he felt like I needed to be there when he signed up for the next step. I was blown away! I never thought calling balls and strikes would create this kind of memory or moment in life. Maybe not important to a bunch of people but the thought that I could have an impact on 1 kids life just really made my day.
    21 points
  2. This past week I found out I was accepted to a collegiate umpiring group and will start to umpire college baseball this coming spring. The long standing members here will remember but I think I first joined UE when I was 15 doing in-house LL games. Excited for the challenge ahead, and looking forward to continuing to improve and climb the ladder.
    14 points
  3. Watching the LL Regionals at San Bernardino and our @JonnyCat is working 1st base with my buddy Dean on the plate. Announcers actually gave both Jon and Dean some serious love mentioning how they like their mechanics. Just thought I would throw out that our friend is kicking butt on ESPN. As I was typing this, they just tried to challenge a call Jon made at 1st which he called an out on and they challenged a pulled foot. Runner is out, call is confirmed. Keep it up Jon!
    12 points
  4. Many years ago, my uncle went to pick up his new car. There was a metal dealer medallion on the left side of the trunk, and the dealers name also on the license plate frame. . My uncle saw them, asked how much he was getting paid for the advertising. Refused to take the car until they took them off. They obliged.
    11 points
  5. Great on your CC and congrats to you. Here is some advice I give to guys when working the plate in a "big game" (that is, when they are in the situation you were in). I've posted this elsewhere, but I'll rehash it here. The key to getting relaxed on the plate (when you're really nervous) is to get the game into a defensive flow. Baseball is the only major American sport which is designed to be in a defensive flow. Think about it: it is the only sport in which the defense possesses the ball. Everyone wants the batters swinging, the ball being put in play, and the defense making plays. When those things are happening, the managers/coaches do not have time to waste yelling at you as they're too busy thinking ahead about their next possible coaching move because the game is moving along at a good pace. So, how does one get the game in a good defensive flow? Usually, at the beginning of the game the first pitch that you have to judge (a pitch where the batter does not swing) is an easy call. Usually the pitcher is so jacked up that he either throws an obvious "ball" or he takes a lot off his velocity and throws a "down-the-middle" strike to calm his nerves. HOWEVER, at some point (usually in the first inning) you're going to get that first "nut-cutter" pitch of the game. This is a pitch that is borderline and could go either way. THE FIRST TIME YOU GET A "NUT CUTTER" PITCH YOU HAVE TO CALL IT A "STRIKE". If you can do that...if you can go onto the field with the mentality that you're going to call the very first borderline pitch you see a "strike"...it sends a message to everyone that you're calling strikes. (And trust me, everyone gets the message.) No one is going to argue with you at this point because (1) the game has just begun and (2) they're trying to figure out your zone and, thus, are not going to complain that you're being inconsistent. By calling this very first borderline pitch a "strike" you let both dugouts know that you're not planning on having a "walk-a-thon". Furthermore, (even if subconsciously) you're telling them and yourself that you are not going to squeeze the zone just because you're nervous. Where plate umpires go wrong when they're nervous is that they allow their nerves to affect their judgment (that's human nature). Unfortunately, it is my experience that the vast majority of umpires who are really nervous end up "squeezing" the zone. And, of course, this is the exact opposite of what you want to do in a "big game". What you want to do in a "big game" is get the game in a defensive flow so that the game has a good pace and everyone is focused on the game (and not you). Call the first nut-cutter a strike, and everything settles in from there. If you can do that, in 98% of these games your nerves will be gone by the second inning. [The other 2% are games where the pitchers themselves cannot overcome their own nerves and the game turns into a walk fest...but at least that has nothing to do with you!] My mantra coming out of the locker room in these games: CALL THE FIRST NUT-CUTTER A STRIKE!!!
    11 points
  6. So our local LL district has been blessed to have a recently retired MLB umpire coming out to work games with us not only during the All Star season, but during the regular season as well. Not saying names, but this gent has some MLB WS experience as well as MLB post season play and a few thousand games under his belt. Just for kicks and giggles, we have been trying to get our local coaches, when this gent come out with us, to go to him and ask him to get help on a call. Rightfully so, all of them have said NO WAY, not going to do it... chickens! Fast forward to last night... 10-11 All Star game... MLB is working 2nd base, calls a runner safe. Since this is the state tournament, none of these teams are local, and most likely have no clue who the guy working 2nd wearing an MLB umpire uniform (versus our LL stuff) actually is. Coach from the defensive team asks for time, and in living video color, goes out to the umpire, asking him to get help on a safe call. Pretty funny watching the coach try and convince this man to get help on his judgement call. Funnier still watching the coach not know how to deal with being told no, it is my call and I have him safe. Not the funniest thing to happen on a field, but I still got a chuckle out of it.
    9 points
  7. From the local paper where the district took place. Proud to say, game 1 for me Saturday was my plate and although I had no idea during, but afterwards I found out I called a perfect game! Photo 2 is during the championship game where the one coach asked if a ball had hit the batter (it didn't) but my partner called me over to make sure. Photo 3 is an out call I had on the red team (the team that won the district) in the 6th when they scored all their runs to lock it up. The teams fans didn't like it, but this photo shows I got the whacker (funny how a still shot shows how NOT close it was )
    9 points
  8. I know I'm reviving a relatively old thread, but I just received a TASO email, saying the jewelry rule is, in fact, no longer. I'm assuming that's because it was a national decision that's filtering down to the states this summer, and not something being taken on independently by the state of Texas. I'd like to think that my public declaration of surrender this season, and my complete and utter IDGAF stance this season was the catalyst The Federation needed to walk away, and I gave them that cover fire. It would be utter bullSH*#, and a grotesque and undeserved expansion of my ego, but imma grab the chalice. You're welcome, America.
    9 points
  9. Our Little League District started hosting a umpire, manager, coach summit which we all call the 'how to work with umpires and not get thrown out of the game meeting'. We discuss what the roles of the manager and coaches are as well as what our role in the process happens to be. We discuss how to interface with us, how to approach us and more importantly, how to remain in the game when they disagree with our ruling. The histrionics which were so prevalent: rushing out of the dugout like a bull, waving the arms, pointing and gesticulating has gone WAY down and of course so have our ejections. The coaches are asking for time, coming out and having actual conversations. When they start to get animated, we are in a position to put the brakes on it, versus the old way where they were already turned up to 11 just coming out of the dugout. No kidding... having this meeting and setting the bar BEFORE the season stars has dropped our ejection rate district wide from what use to exceed 20 per season to less than 5 last season and zero so far this year. I think if every organization set the bar prior to their seasons, especially for youth ball, the numbers would drop across the board.
    9 points
  10. Hi everyone, I'm sure my story isn't isolated, so interested to hear what's gotten others "back in the mask" after a long time away. After having not umpired since my college days, I got back into calling games (informally) over the past couple of seasons, mainly as help for travel clubs (starting with my own boys' club) not being able to get engaged officials for anything outside of sanctioned tournaments. Started calling some weekend double-headers primarily at 14u and 12u levels, and forgot how much fun it is to remind these players and coaches (and hopefully, by extension, some of the parents...) that good umpiring can be such a huge asset to the game. This winter I went through some classroom and on-field clinics with my 13-yr old son to get him on the Youth Umpire list with a few Little Leagues in our area, and he has really gotten after it. Does a couple weeknight games on his "off nights" from club practices, and Saturday games when we're not travelling for tournaments. He's really taking a liking to the role, and his transition from "14u player" to "mature, professional-acting umpire" is really fun to watch. My wife took him to an assignment last week after having not seen him on the field for a couple of months, and was blown away by his confidence and controlled demeanor on the field with a bunch of adults he doesn't know. I've had a blast working as a crew together on some higher-level 50/70 games and Majors games with him, and he's become a requested umpire for the District from a couple of our local leagues! Pretty fun to watch them learn and fall in love with something new about this great game. Thanks for the site, love reading through all the posts and we'll likely be more active members on here through the spring and summer. Play Ball!
    9 points
  11. What @maven said, plus understand that unless you are in the pro ranks somewhere, coaches do not get to 'get their monies worth' on anything. They may not be happy, they may not like a ruling, but they never, ever, get to pull the crap you see on TV in amateur youth baseball. Be approachable. Be calm. I try to always face the field and let the coaches face the stands. That way when they get animated, the people see him losing control, not me. Answer questions, not statements. They are competing to win, not you. They spend hours and hours a week with their team practicing, you don't. Understand where they are coming from and it makes it easier to understand why they are passionate and want the call to go their way. This should not influence you, but understanding the why helps understand their reactions. And then there are just some ass hats out there who are, well... ass hats.
    8 points
  12. Just got a phone call today from some MiLB supervisors telling me I got a full ride to pro school, and I'm stoked. My plan is to graduate from college in 2025, and then attend the school. They said that they will hold the scholarship for me until I finish my education. Guys, if there's an MLB one day camp near you, go! Great instruction and from what I hear they are giving out 3-5 scholarships per camp. Here's a pic from the camp:
    8 points
  13. Some years ago at a 2 man clinic an instructor was telling us about taking steps to get on the outfield side of third base when your only runner is r3 and he heads home on a passed ball, or any trailing runner rounds third and heads home. Just in case something happens and the runner retreats you’re in a great spot. I’ve always tried to do this but it has never amounted to anything but a longer run back to “A” after the runner scored…..until today. r2 only. Stealing on the pitch, wild pitch bounces far from F 2. r2 rounds 3rd and heads home. As he does, I head to the back side of 3b. A hustling F2 gets to the ball, and fires a strike to f1 covering home. R2 reversed course and heads back to third, F1 fires to third, and I’m in the wedge on the back side of 3b in foul territory for a great look at the play coming right at me! I see the tag, bang the out. 3B coach looks up, and says “ I’ve never seen a base umpire there in a two man crew”. I said “ thank you”. Very cool feeling when those “ post pitch” / “post base runner” steps work out.
    8 points
  14. 7+ years of doing this and I finally have an action photo! Both sides of a play even… out on the tag!
    8 points
  15. You say LL, so I am going on the assumption this is an actual LL and not just one using 'most' of their rules. I am also going on the assumption that both of your umpires were minors (junior) umpires and that you were at the game site as the Game Coordinator. 9.03(d) If no adult umpire is available for a game, and non-adult umpires are used exclusively for that game, the local Little League must assign an adult as Game Coordinator, or the game cannot be played. The Game Coordinator must not be a manager or coach of either team in the game, and cannot be assigned as Game Coordinator for more than one game at a time. The Game Coordinator's duties shall be: (1) To be included in the pregame meeting as noted in Rule 4.01: (2) To remain present at the game at all times, including between half-innings, in a position to see all actions on the field and in close proximity to the field (not in any enclosure). If, for some reason, the Game Coordinator is not present or is unable to perform his/her duties for any reason, the game must be suspended until the Game Coordinator returns, or until a new adult Game Coordinator is present and assumes the duties of Game Coordinator for the remainder of the game; (3) To oversee the conduct of all players, managers, coaches, and umpires in the game; (4) To have the authority to disqualify any player, coach, manager, or substitute for objecting to the decisions of an umpire, for unsportsmanlike conduct or language, or for any of the reasons enumerated in these Playing Rules, and to eject such disqualified person for the playing field. If the Game Coordinator disqualifies a player while a play is in progress, the disqualification shall not take effect until no further action is possible in that play; etc, etc... Basically points 3 and 4 above... when this JA continued to argue, to come out and argue again after the fact during the 1/2 inning, you could have, and had the authority to show him the parking lot. We have a good number of Junior umpires in our LL, and the word is out to the managers and coaches... mess with them at your own risk because if they don't dump you, our game coordinators will in a heart beat. Coaches are expected to be professional and to only speak to our juniors in a conversational tone. Any berating, aggressive posturing or speech and the conversation is over. Failure to comply is an immediate trip to the parking lot. This JA is 100% what LL does not want or need. Glad you were there to mentor and have your kids back. Keep up the good work!
    8 points
  16. Oh but it does, it sooooo does... as I'll explain below... There shouldn't be a delay like this, especially for the following reason behind it. You as BU is a component of the dynamic of the story here, because that means your partner is PU... or UIC... in a NFHS game. 😬 <- is this the nervous face? Lemme find a nervous face... 😨 <- that's a fearful face... I can go one "worse"... 😱 . Nothing good can come from this. Your partner is an idiot. It's not "a thing". It's never been "a thing". Your partner made it his own "thing". As my good friend @wolfe_man points out, and I'm sure others will too, there's nothing explicitly in the Rulebook(s) about it. At any level, or any code. Instead, your partner chose to implement his own code of morality / ethics / sportsmanship, scooping up that whole arcane attitude of "Not on my field!" (which is synonymous to "Get off my lawn!"; which is also a sibling of Karens approaching total strangers and saying, "You know what your problem is... ?"). I'm going all-in that this "projection of sportsmanship" is your partner's reason behind removing the eye black. If I'm wrong, I – MadMax – am wrong... but I've been in baseball as a player and as an umpire long enough to know what I'm talking about on this topic. Maybe his (your partner's) claim is that the eyeblack could / would / might end up on a baseball and act as a "foreign substance". Maybe. But I doubt he processed it that far... Instead, I'm betting he's fully in the camp of, "That's intimidation! That's intimidation to the opposing team! No fun here! No competition here! Not on my field!... Get off my lawn!". This forced, projected, deliberate, heavy-handed "officiating" often gets painted as "preventative umpiring". It isn't. Preventative Umpiring is more along the lines of whispering to a pitcher, "Hey, make sure you completely stop. That last one ya kinda rolled right through it." These guys who are chasing players back into dugouts, making big ta-doos about jewelry, going through all this blabbering about "how to approach an umpire" ultimately are doing these things because it is their attempt at "conflict avoidance"... which usually means they are weak at "conflict resolution". Yeah, I'm on a soapbox. And to some of my colleagues here, it may appear I'm on a soapbox... in the median... of a six-lane highway. But these same colleagues also know I've mentioned before this phenomena I've labeled "viral umpiring". Where some guy, somewhere, either misinterprets, misapplies, or (worse) makes up a rule, and then positions it into "his" game, patting himself on the back that he provided a/the solution to his umpiring "situation". This has damaging effects, though, as it ripples out and affects not only his officiating going forward, but his umpire partner(s), the coaches, and to a minor degree, the players. So while one guy believes, in his own opinion, that eyeblack isn't to be worn by the pitcher on his field, now at least 3 others think that is true in all games going forward! How fortunate you ( @pl8ump1012 ) came here to inquire! Bravo! Now, I also acknowledge and appreciate that you, pl8, didn't draw a line in the sand, or depth charge your partner from 96' away. Does this "ruling" ultimately affect the proceedings and outcome of the game? No. So I (too) wouldn't make a big thing about it, and step in to correct my partner. If he's making a "ruling" that affects the playing status or eligibility of the players, or affects the proceedings of the game, then we must step in, as umpires, and correct it. Example – calling a Balk on a move / feint to 2B. Your PU partner believes that a F1 has to throw to 2B, or that he has to throw to a fielder at the base. This is not true, and that explanation is in the Rulebook as such. So I as a BU must step in and correct that. It's not a Balk. I get infuriated at YouTube clips – two infamous ones in particular – that not only show improper rulings, but the partners don't step in (even after, not just in the moment in realtime!) to correct it!! One is the softball foul ball, with a 3-man crew, where the foul ball – the actual ball itself – is retrieved by the on deck hitter, who throws it to-and-past the F1... and the 3BC starts jumping up and down and sends R3 and R2 in to score! ... and the crew lets the play (non-play, actually) stand!!! Another is one where R2 (only) feints a steal of 3B, and the catcher (F2), after receiving the pitch throws to F5 at 3B... and the PU calls a Balk!!! For what? For throwing to an unoccupied base!!! That was his actual explanation! And his BU partner does nothing to correct it! Here's the point where the NFHS Rules component of your tale comes into play... NFHS (unfortunately) places a "deification" clause in regarding the PU / UIC that whatever he (ultimately) rules is the be-all, end-all, absolute final say on anything regarding the game. Way too many guys take this to an extreme, and get this "I'm infallible" god-complex (small g) and puff their chest out and take this "my game, my way" attitude into these games which are, at their very nature, a competitive arena. We're not supposed to compete; we're supposed to officiate. So yeah, eyeblack ain't a "thing". At the risk of going into an even longer diatribe, and threatening any kind of productivity in my day, I'll just leave it there, and give ya a pat on the back as to how you handled it in that moment, and encourage you to keep atop your handling of situations in regards to how they relate to the Rulebook(s).
    8 points
  17. Old West Vest mask. Before: After: Vinyl stripped and spray painted
    8 points
  18. For me, it depends on the level. HS JV and up, I'd let it go—I'd rather have an out! Below that, I'd simply state the fact: it was a foul tip. That explains the runner's perception without coaching him on the proper action to take. If he doesn't know what a foul tip entails and gets put out, that will be a learning experience. If he asks a follow up, I'll refer him to his coach.
    8 points
  19. overstated, but I always used "If the BATTED ball doesn't leave the infield, PU doesn't leave the plate."
    8 points
  20. You go to a minor league game and have no idea what the 18 players did but were all consumed with what the two guys were doing.
    8 points
  21. There is a reason some umpires refer to coaches as rats. This tool is a great example. That he was around to make the second set of accusations is something that should have never been allowed to occur. Some one ought to school him on how to talk to officials. Some one ought to school him on appeals versus fishing for an answer he likes. Someone ought to clue him in that officials talk to one another. Someone ought to clue him in that bringing up perceived wounds from prior games gets tickets to the parking lot punched. He would not have been around to start a second round if I were in your shoes. The next time I saw him he would have no wiggle room. Say something stupid, ticket punched. Dump him every time until the message is received. Dump anyone who acts like this. Your afternoon always gets better and you will become more comfortable with every ejection. There is no regret in writing an ejection report that includes everything this jackass said. This guy should have been ejected as soon as he started with his prattling about whatever his gripe of the moment was. As our long missing friend @BigUmpire would have said, shoot one monkey and rest tend to fall in line. There is no game fee in the world that allows d-bags like this to stay with in sight and sound of a field when they are given enough rope to hang a warren full of rats. You said you partner was a senior guy who was "doing a great job behind the plate." Where was he when clown boy was demonstrating his ignorance for all to see? I would love to know how your post game conversation with your partner went. He allowed you to get steamrolled. You make no mention of your experience, so I presume that all of this ass-hattery is something you have no experience with or have not dealt with effectively (read eject). P-shah to the moral high ground. It isn't worth diddley squat. He should have been ejected..... twice.
    8 points
  22. Hilarious, considering that there is a merit-based system in place (including the awarding of playoff assignments and crew chief positions). At least get your facts straight; the seniority-based system started dying in the 1990's and completely died in August of 1999. As for "we can all name the MLB umpires with the poorest performances". That's laughable. Everyone and their mother always names "Angel Hernandez" first when listing the umpire with the "poorest performances". The only problem, however, is that the objective facts don't bear this out. From 2001 to around 2013 (I forget the exact last year as I forgot what year I was discussing this with a friend who works in umpire administration), Angel finished in the top 5 every year in the computer grades for balls and strikes calls. Yet, through all those years he was consistently named by announcers, members of the print media, and idiots on social media as the worst umpire. So, the idea that "we" can all agree on the umpires with the poorest performances is wrong.
    8 points
  23. I think there is a couple of ways to handle this situation, and this can help you in others, as well. 1. You could have just ejected right after the F-bomb. Kid was mouthy, maybe it was time he learns in a Fall Ball game rather than a regular season. I'd have no problem with you dumping the kid. 2. Rather than saying, "please watch your language," a stern "That's enough" in conjunction with your hand up giving the stop sign, is a better warning. Now if the kid doesn't get the warning and mouths off again, he's done. He got his warning, after that, it's on him. Saying, "please watch your language," and wanting a response back, sets you up for needless banter with the player. What if he doesn't answer you? Now you have to decide if you want to escalate the interaction. You told him twice to watch the language, and you got a snarky remark back. Keep your conversation to a minimum. Give him a stern warning. If the player decides to continue with being a jerk, then he gets dumped and learns a lesson. Saying "please watch your language" is asking him to comply. "That's enough" is telling him to knock it off. You're the one that is in charge of the situation. Don't let the kid be in charge. Hope that is helpful.
    7 points
  24. [anxiously awaits @JimKirk to roll out his new mascot and the new Umpy plush toy made from recycled chest protector foam*] *The new Umpy plush toy is not NOCSAE approved.
    7 points
  25. This is when the ejection needed to happen. 10u there is no profanity, it's one of the 3 Ps.
    7 points
  26. I know the guy who runs the Mid-American Umpire Clinic. 🙋‍♂️ I’d be happy to answer any questions you might have. Who knows…reaching out and asking some questions about the clinic might have some financial benefit…
    7 points
  27. The catchers that I've asked were all fine with it, except 1. I always ask first. But hey, let's make a deal. I'll learn to stop adjusting to catchers by touch, and you learn how use the word 'their'.
    7 points
  28. LL Majors. Top 4. None on, one out. Rung up the batter on a called third strike pretty much right down the middle, 2-2 count. Each called strike the batter showed visible frustration...right after the 3rd strike he turned out of the batters box and slammed his bat two-handed into the ground, like he was chopping wood with an axe. Walked into the dugout and threw his bat and helmet. I walked down the 3rd base line to the HC and told him #26 is ejected for unsportsmanlike conduct, calm and no drama from HC...he told Joey to pack up his gear and go sit with his parents, he was done. No screaming parents, no waiting to confront me after the game...had to say I was a bit surprised by that. Figured it would be worse.
    7 points
  29. Okay.... 1) "I wonder if the loud coaches and fans are wrong or " Answer: They're wrong. More accurately: they're ugly and stupid AND they're wrong. And they might smell bad, too. 2) Regarding the rough times... at the risk of blatantly advertising my own writing, here's an excerpt from something I wrote on "Talk Me Off The Ledge" a few days ago: "Also, around that time, I just said to myself "f--k these f--king guys, and all their f--king bulls--t" - and the healing began." At a certain point, I firmly believe that's what you have to do. If you're not as inclined to be as happily profane as I am, you can find your own phrase, but I like the mouth-feel of it myself. Look, it's always been an Us Versus Them in the game. So embrace it, and make them A Them.
    7 points
  30. In my earlier days, I had one of those. No set. Me (pointing): "That's! ..." (pitcher throws to first) Me: "... a really good move"
    7 points
  31. This is the worst part, and (outside cozy relationships) I don't understand why TD's are so reluctant to hold them accountable. I've been a TD...my wife has been a TD. And we're of the same mind...I got your money weeks ago...it's in the bank...I've paid for the umps and the diamonds...you're not getting a red F*#King cent back, and if you, coach, want to take your ball/team and go home, then "happy trails"...I'll worry about team recruitment for next year's tournament...next year. I ripped a coach a new asshole right in front crowded bleachers for his incessant complaining of umpires, field maintenance staff and tournament volunteers..."if I hear another word from you the parking lot is over there, and if you want to take your team then I have zero F*#Ks to give, because, quite literally, NOBODY wants you here." Umps and I had a good time that evening. The reality is, if you run a good tournament, you are turning teams away every year, not begging to find new ones. Yes, I want the teams, I want the players, I want a good tournament and not have a round robin bracket with forfeits...but I will have no tolerance for any kind of abuse of the umpires, the other paying teams and especially the volunteers. Yes, I'll go to bat for the paying customer too...but 99 times out of a 100, they're just flexing, and they're fostering a toxic culture on their team.
    7 points
  32. They can. I use them as a hammer... Actual example I had two years ago... Had a coach that is always a problem in a JV game. He is up by like 12 runs with bases loaded and the other team is on their 4th or 5th 'pitcher'--who obviously has not been told how to pitch. After the first pitch I go and clean up the rubber and maybe mention for him to make sure and come set. The 3rd base (head) coach starts screaming at me that I'm not allowed to coach to kid. My job is to 'enforce all of the rules no exceptions'. I ask him if he is sure that is what he wants me to do. To which he replies yes. I confirm again and he again says yes. At that point I look around and low and behold batter is blinged out, all the runners on base have those rubber wrist things, on and on. So, I enforce the balk, warn the kid/coach on 3rd and then eject the batter, R1 and R2 and send him to the dugout. (May have skipped a step, but, oh well).
    7 points
  33. PU: Get in the box. B: I don't have to. PU: Strike 3! You're right.
    7 points
  34. My opinion: quit FB. Easy.
    7 points
  35. 7 points
  36. You might be an umpire if you see some sort of argument going on anywhere (Costco parking lot, Starbucks, etc) then throw up your hands and yell "TIME!" I did that once in a bar, where two patrons were about to throw down. So startingly it was that everyone stopped and revaluated the dumb situation (including myself).
    7 points
  37. The system is ....... sport specific boxer brief underwear (I like Adidas Climacool) .... Nutty Buddy, jock, then tights. I never ( VERY RARELY) have to adjust the cup, and there's no reason to get totally undressed between games, ... reach down and slip the cup out from under the jock.
    7 points
  38. You rush home after work to make sure that you get the latest delivery from Ump-Attire before the wife gets home and see it. Trying to avoid the inevitable "What are you getting now? Don't you already have everything".
    7 points
  39. Whatever the size of the difference, this difference can pucker an umpire's cheeks faster than anything else: All I know is that one day I went to rub up the baseballs before my plate job and instead of them reading, "New York-Penn League," they read "American League". I asked the clubby what was up. His reply was, "you didn't hear? Gooden has a rehab start tonight." And that's how I found out (through the label on a baseball) that I was umpiring my first game with an actual MLB pitcher. Talk about not being able to fit a pinhead up my a$$!
    7 points
  40. I was just at an NCAA camp a couple weeks ago and someone brought this up, and the instructor, who works Big 10 conference games said “I know you are told not to do it, but on any close pitch, what are you going to hear?” “Where was that at?” He said “I’m just avoiding the question” and followed up with “if I say ball down” and coach says “that’s not down”, I can just ignore it but at least I avoided a back and forth (ball, where was that, I had it down, that’s not down). he said “you can only get in trouble if it’s a horribly blown call” and if that’s the case, you’re in trouble with coach whether you said where it was or not. long story short, he gives location on a close pitch (within a ball width or so) to avoid a back and forth. I personally like this philosophy, and I definitely like it better than “selling a ball” with more emphasis on close ones. Just “ball away” as calm and confident as any other call. I think that will avoid a lot of conversation about strike zone
    7 points
  41. My biggest issue (as an association assignor/past President) is the closely related, "that's not how we did things in (insert geographic location)!" The implication being that our association is doing things incorrectly because that's not how said umpire's prior association in said umpire's previous geographic location did things. I live in one of the fastest growing areas of the country (South Carolina). We have people (and umpires) who move here from all over the country (especially the northeast and upper midwest). Every year we get a number of "new" umpires who want to join our association. They provide us with resumes that state they have umpired high school for numerous years, have worked the playoffs for numerous number of years, etc. In other words, they submit a really strong umpiring resume for working high school baseball. And, we are genuinely excited to have them (I think every association in the country in this day and age would be glad to have them as we all want to grow.) Unfortunately, I know in the beginning of the year that a number of them will wash out "because we don't do things the way they did it back in (insert geographic location)." For example, one year we had a guy quit because he was adamant that back in Michigan the base umpire in a two-man (baseball) crew had to wear a ball bag. I told him that he cannot wear a ball bag on the bases (nor could he go to the mound and brush off the rubber). He was adamant that he had to do these things and that we were wrong and he left. Other times they argue and argue because we do not use the FED mechanics manual (we've been using the PBUC/MilBUD manual for 20-years with great success). Other times they complain because we assign a specific umpire to the plate and another to the bases each game...and they are not allowed to switch. And, there are a million other reasons, and I've heard them all: complaints about what uniforms we wear, how we assign umpires, our training requirements, our testing requirements, etc. All of those topics have been the subject of a sentence uttered by a new umpire which ended with, "...that's not how we did it back in _______________!" A lot of these guys will give up working in our high school association and will go work travel/rec ball where there are no evaluations nor standards which allows them to do whatever they want. I just don't get the mentality of an umpire coming into our association (or any association) of 70+ members and thinking that we should be doing things the way things are done back in Texas (or wherever) because, "by GOD, that's where I'm from and that's how it should be done!!!" The bottom line is, "when in Rome, do as the Romans do." If I, personally, were to move to another state tomorrow and I desired to start umpiring in my new state and the local high school association told me that they strictly follow the FED mechanics manual, (after laughing under my breath) I would say "okay" and would never say another word about it. I'm afraid that too many of us in my hypothetical situation would say, "well, back in South Carolina we would never use these stupid FED mechanics!"
    7 points
  42. I had the honor of working the 1st ever college game played at the Field of Dreams movie site. Here are some of my favorites for this once in a lifetime opportunity.
    6 points
  43. I think getting a new CP is a moot point if you are not looking at getting a good harness. I believe most people here use an UL Flex harness from Ray @Razzer because it keeps the CP up and snug to make sure your collarbone has coverage by your CP. You can have the best CP out there, but if it sags because of a crappy harness, your collarbone is always going to be at risk.
    6 points
  44. I used the logic that there isn't really a good looking plate shoe...I might as well get something completely different! Ha!....I'm hoping that maybe with the spikes on my feet, they'll be distracted and not notice all of the pitches I'm missing.
    6 points
  45. Sounds like you handled it very well. Although, and I would pay good money to see it just 1 time, if you would have crouched and gotten in the slot behind him and give it a big K3 again, that would be marvelous [emoji1787][emoji6][emoji1787][emoji6]. Elite, indeed. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    6 points
  46. Well, they are wearing navy, so.....
    6 points
  47. You can't watch baseball with your family on tv, because you have to constantly remind them that the box is wrong and most announcers are brainlets when it comes to rules.
    6 points
  48. We live in a social media world where everyone gets an "opinion" (Like!), no matter how wrong, unhinged, unhealthy, ill-informed, seditious, or evil. This thread is not the first time that the so-called post-truth era has reared its head on this forum. Unfortunately, nobody has to accept "you're incorrect" any longer: they can simply say, "that's not my reality." For umpiring, we still rely on the "system" to weed out this nonsense, and we promise promotions and threaten lack thereof to those who decline to accept the "realities" of the game. Go back to kiddie ball. But I wonder how long that can last. Yesterday's truth and objective standards are today's bias and prejudice. Cancel the umpire.
    6 points
×
×
  • Create New...