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  2. For what it's worth, I'm pretty sure that is a balk in OBR. I think it's usually read as a feint, as the first baseman isn't in a position to make a play (unless I'm misreading, and the F3 could have made a play if he had reacted to the throw).
  3. The problem is, sometimes if you interpret the rule book as written, 100% literal, it is either clearly not what was intended, or in contradiction with some other rule. In this case, clearly they don't want it based off of the number written next to the name. If you have any suspicion that the way it reads is intended to be enforced that way, then by all means, read it literal, that is safer, but in cases where the rule book is clearly wrong... It doesn't make sense to read it literal. While I agree that cross reading interpretations of rules in other rule sets can be dangerous, especially when FED is the set being cross read to, it can help determine intent of the rule, which effects how you read the rule. Take it with a grain of salt, but certainly consider it.
  4. Today
  5. Saw that happen in a high school softball game ... bases were loaded and the defensive coach gave the batter the intentional pass. The offense didn’t figure it out what was happening until it was too late. They thought they were getting a free run. Appeal, out, everybody goes back.
  6. Sorry this is so long. Feel free to skip it since it doesn’t add much to the conversation ... just a “new” guy trying to explain his point of view/ranting. Noumpere, I understand what you are saying ... but that is possibly the stupidest thing I have ever heard. I’m not saying it’s not true. I hope you don’t take that as anything intended to be personal, because it certainly is not meant that way. (Again, I apologize if I offend anybody — I can sometimes be rather blunt to get to a point). Why would we even bother to read the rule book then? We had this discussion at a college showcase I worked this weekend. Umpires from various geographic areas came in to work and the discussion came up (from one of my games) about the myth that the hands are part of the bat. My partner and I had the call right on the field, but the ensuing discussion in the “locker room” resulted in five different umpires (all from the same area downstate) adamantly insisting the batter’s hands are indeed considered part of the bat. As I pulled my book out, we asked them why they thought that. All of them said the UICs in their area have always told them that. When we read the very clearly written rule to them, they still tried to claim it was wrong. They finally relented and asked us “Why would our UICs tell us that?” Which brings me to my (probably incorrect) point ... many of these things that have come up lately seem to come about like the scenario I mentioned above. Our answer was “It’s probably because your UICs have been umpiring for decades, but haven’t actually read the rulebook in recent years.” Many of the things being bantered about here seem like that. “I’ve umpired for XX years” or “I paid to go to an umpiring school”. Very little seems to come from an actual reading of the rule book with a citation posted. I am not trying to discount anybody’s experience ... just to say that umpires can start to lose touch with the rule book if they aren’t reading and comprehending the words written down in it. Don’t get me wrong, I really appreciate and enjoy the interpretations that get posted, but they seem to be presented as gospel without much explanation or clarification (meaning: this interpretation comes from OBR, when we are talking about FED where the actual rule book says otherwise). More than once the response has seemed like “don’t actually work through the scenario by what the rules say, do this other thing that somebody else decided he would do instead.” I’m sorry if I tick anybody off, that’s not my intent. I’ve always been a person who likes to dig into the minutiae, solve puzzles/mysteries, and debate the intricacies of a situation. It’s what I love about umpiring. But being flat out told “Well, yes the rule says that very clearly, but you should read it differently because this guy wrote a text book about some other rule set” does not make any sense to me. If that’s the case, maybe this forum isn’t for me or some of the other new guys who have reached out on some of these same issues. I came hoping for intellectual debate and education, not perpetual “just do it this way to make it easy.” The rule books aren’t perfect, I get that.
  7. One thing that really sucks is the coach who has been an umpire and then goes and acts like he did.
  8. Here's the best way to handle this. If you are sure that the wrong batter is batting you want to end the at bat as soon as possible, because if there's a steal or a wild pitch or a passed ball, those runners don't have to go back after you appeal the batting out of order. Also, if the other team realizes that the wrong batter is up before the at bat is finished they can send up the correct batter. In the major leagues you can drill the batter with the first pitch and then appeal the batting out of order. If you want to be a nice guy you can instead issue an intentional walk and then appeal the batting out of order.
  9. Wendelstedt interpretation manual and Evans balk video are crystal clear on this play but the game was played under FED rules so I'm looking for a FED interp. R1 & R2, F1 pitching from the stretch, F3 not holding R1. Right-handed F1 not realizing F3 isn't holding R1 picks to first. F1 steps directly towards first, gains distance, and throw the ball directly to the base. F3 is caught off guard and doesn't move a step. The ball hits R1 as he dives back to the base and comes to rest beside him. Is this a balk in FED? It's not under professional rules. I've had a number of umpires tell me this is a balk but they tend to confuse throwing the ball to F3 who is standing still away from first base vs. throwing it directly to the base as they explain why it's a balk. Can anyone help by pointing me to the exact FED rule or a FED casebook play covering this situation? Thanks in advance for your help.
  10. Not golf. As long as they don't increase intensity right when the pitcher releases the ball. Don't be ridiculous and keep the chant going through the whole pitch.
  11. Does chanting, by the team in the dugout, fall into any part of 4.06, or any other LL rule violation? Do you let it to continue while a pitcher is delivering the ball. "Three, two, what you gonna do...walk him, walk him" as an example. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G935A using Tapatalk
  12. Umpire judgment. In MLB (and that's who the rules are written for), it's obvious nearly 100% of the time. At levels where they "borrow" OBR, it's probably only 98%,
  13. The sooner you, and some others here recently, recognize that the rules don't always say exactly what they mean or mean exactly what they say, the sooner you will advance in your umpiring career. (And, this isn't meant as a criticism -- all of us have played the game at some point or another.)
  14. Or, called him out for abandonment, or not granted time until the play resolved itself (likely with the defense tagging Segura for an out)
  15. You really just need something that will offer you a little bit of support (as a backing to write on) and a couple of small binder clips (see below). A checkbook cover with some cardboard would do, but you might check the office stores for some kind of small pocket folder (or a notebook even). Edit: just read the other thread posted above ... the passport holder looks like a great option! For what it is worth, I have used the cheap little $5 ones I pick up at my USA Softball clinic every year. Just a few weeks ago I splurged and ordered this: https://www.ump-attire.com/Baseball-Umpire-Equipment/Bags-Tools/Writing-Materials/ULF-PRO_Pro-Grade-Magnetic-Book-Style-6-Umpire-Lineup-Card-Holder-Game-Card-Referee-Wallet It actually earned me some coach compliments at the State Tournament I worked this year. It does help to present a more professional image at your plate meeting!
  16. Yesterday
  17. HP Umpire Mark Ripperger ejected Giants CF Kevin Pillar (strike two call; QOCY) in the bottom of the 8th inning of the Mets-Giants game. With two out and one on (R1), Pillar took a 1-1 curveball from Mets pitcher Seth Lugo for a called second strike. Replays indicate the pitch was located over the... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]] View the full article
  18. I’ve heard of people using a cover from a check book with some cardboard slid into the pockets to stiffen it up. Would need to be in ball bag pockets, to long for shirt pocket. Old thread too Amazon’s prime https://www.amazon.com/Adams-USA-Holder-Style-Black/dp/B07B9XHK2Z/ref=sr_1_1?crid=27WXGR89DFSS1&keywords=umpire+lineup+card+holder&qid=1563746368&s=sporting-goods&sprefix=Umpire+li%2Csporting%2C133&sr=1-1
  19. Again, words matter. I would say, no, it isn’t a courtesy in FED as the rules state what you should have included on your lineup card. But as there is no actual penalty, I suppose you could interpret it that way. Maybe it is just highly frowned upon.
  20. agdz59

    Tagging Up/Advancing

    To add to maven's reply (correct me if I am wrong), the Segura play was not an appeal. Because it was not a force situation, Segura had legal title to second when he returned there. That is why Braun was out on the tag instead of Segura. In general, if two runners are on a base: if it's a result of a force play, the trailing runner is entitled to the base. If there was no force, it's the lead runner's base.
  21. maven

    Tagging Up/Advancing

    None of what you say is correct. The previous poster stated it correctly: the defense may appeal a baserunning infraction (including failure to retouch) by tagging the runner (anywhere on the field) or the base where the infraction occurred. Being in contact with any base (other than the one where the infraction occurred, which corrects the error) is no protection from the appeal. The pro rule is 5.09(c); the HS rule is 8–2–6. The Segura play was ruled incorrectly at the time. The umpires should have replaced him at 2B after the trailing runner was tagged out. IIRC, this guidance is now part of the pro umpiring manual.
  22. Guest

    Tagging Up/Advancing

    How do you assess the Jean Segura play then?? After seeing that, my assumption has been that anytime you are on a base - you are safe unless tagged or put out?? I understand that, this is a pickoff and know the rule of two runners on one base, but wouldn’t the same theory apply? I was under the assumption that you must double the runner off at first, or tag him while running. Once standing safely on second, I thought the only appeal play would be to tag first base with the ball. Any citation of a specific rule?? Thanks so much for the reply!
  23. agdz59

    Tagging Up/Advancing

    Yes, if the fielder communicates to the umpire why he is tagging the runner or, in the umpire's judgement, it is obvious the defender is tagging the runner to appeal the missed 1st base, the runner can be tagged while on second base.
  24. Mr. Biscuit, of course, you are right when you say that everything but name and order are courtesy. In fact, it actually says that in the NCAA rule and in the OBR interpretation-- 2019-2020 NCAA rule 4-4a. Receive from the home team and visiting team their respective batting orders, in duplicate. The umpire will determine that the copies are identical, keep one copy and give the other copy to the opposing team’s representative. The umpire now is officially in charge of the game, and the lineups are official; Note: If a team’s lineup does not include all nine players (and the pitcher if a designated hitter is used), the umpire should call this to the attention of the coach. If a player’s jersey number does not match the number on the official lineup, the umpire shall ensure that the number on all cards is corrected. Lineup cards are required to list the batting order by names. Numbers are a courtesy. There is no penalty. OBR Official Interpretation: Wendelstedt: The matching of uniform numbers to the names is a courtesy. The name of the player is what governs. And, even though it does not use those exact words, it can be construed in FED case plays as in the following. Also see 2019 case play 1.1.3 SITUATION where it concludes with “Listing of both numbers and positions provides easier recordkeeping for scorekeepers and umpires.” 2006 NFHS Baseball Rules Interpretations SITUATION 8: The first batter of the game gets a single and ends up on first base. The next batter, B2, comes to bat and is wearing a different jersey number than the number listed on the lineup card. Following B2’s single, and before the next pitch, the opposing team’s coach appeals batting-out-of-order. RULING: While B2 is in technical violation of the rule that requires a player’s name, shirt number and position to be on the lineup card, there is no penalty, since the batting-out-of-order rule requires that the name be in the proper order. The umpire should revise his lineup card accordingly and deny the batting-out-of-order appeal. (1-1-2, 7-1-1)
  25. Guest

    Tagging Up/Advancing

    Situation: Leadoff batter reaches first safely. (Runner on first, no outs) Next hitter hits a flyball to CF that is caught, but the runner does not tag up and runs to second base. While safely standing on second base, the ball is thrown in and the runner is tagged. (While on second). I know the rule is: you must tag the player or his original base. However, what is the call if he’s safely standing at second? Note: after being tagged, the fielder threw the ball to the pitcher and the runner safely ran back to first to avoid any appeal play at first base. Can you tag out a baserunner that is standing on a base? Understand he did leave early, but was not forced out in anyway after the catch was made. Thanks!!
  26. Having barred Haywood High School Baseball from the 2020 and 2021 postseasons after head coach Jeff 'Dusty' Rhodes' on-field hysterics complete with kicking at and physically berating an umpire after a balk call, the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association (TSSAA) entertained an appeal from... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]] View the full article
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