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Gfoley4

Quick pitch or no

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I have the batter in position, his head up, and reasonably set.. looks good to me. Now... his pitching position, if under NCAA rules, looks to be illegal.

 

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14 minutes ago, JSam21 said:

I have the batter in position, his head up, and reasonably set.. looks good to me. Now... his pitching position, if under NCAA rules, looks to be illegal.

 

His bat isn't in position. Not reasonably set.

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On further review, the call stands.

I think it probably is a quick pitch, but it wasn't dangerous (yes, I know that's not a requirement, but it is the reasoning). I'm not arguing with anybody on this one (unless I'm a coach and it's against my team). The batter didn't seem to be fazed by it.

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10 minutes ago, kylehutson said:

it wasn't dangerous (yes, I know that's not a requirement, but it is the reasoning).

That is absolutely not the only reasoning for preventing quick pitches. It's to give the batter an opportunity to actually have a chance to hit the pitch.

 

10 minutes ago, kylehutson said:

The batter didn't seem to be fazed by it.

He stood there and stared back at the umpire. The pitch was basically a cock shot, so he's definitely not questioning the location.

I absolutely have a quick pitch here. Not knowing the context, such as inning or whether the pitcher's been doing it, I can't give a full opinion on what I'd do. If this is the first time he did it, I'm talking to F2 at the start of the next inning. If there's been a talking already, then I'm killing the pitch.

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Timing of being a quick pitch or not, the new NCAA rules for both the windup and set positions have him in an illegal pitching position.  If he's in a windup, his non-pivot foot has to be at or behind the front edge of the rubber with shoulders facing the batter.  If he's in the set, his shoulders need to be facing the respective foul line at the time of stopping and his pivot foot parallel and in contact ot the rubber.  Ruling:  Balk if anyone was on base, ball on the batter if not.  No more warnings.  

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7 minutes ago, yawetag said:

That is absolutely not the only reasoning for preventing quick pitches. It's to give the batter an opportunity to actually have a chance to hit the pitch.

 

I respectfully disagree.

OBR makes a very specific point of stating "The quick pitch is dangerous and should not be permitted."  The word "danger" makes no other appearance in the OBR book.  I think that clearly indicates the intent and motive for the rule.

The goal is not to give the batter a fighting chance to get a hit, it's to give the batter an opportunity to protect himself.

Regardless, I do agree with the assessment that it's a quick pitch - the batter did not get a reasonable opportunity to set himself...as such, I think it was dangerous.

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6 hours ago, beerguy55 said:

I respectfully disagree.

OBR makes a very specific point of stating "The quick pitch is dangerous and should not be permitted."  The word "danger" makes no other appearance in the OBR book.  I think that clearly indicates the intent and motive for the rule.

The goal is not to give the batter a fighting chance to get a hit, it's to give the batter an opportunity to protect himself.

Regardless, I do agree with the assessment that it's a quick pitch - the batter did not get a reasonable opportunity to set himself...as such, I think it was dangerous.

NCAA did not like it when they allowed a sideways pitcher to windup and he threw without a windup. They changed this year to allow a squared up pitcher to elect to not step back and/or windup because it's more obvious when that pitcher is delivering even without a windup. But this batter was not ready and I have a QP. I noted the NCAA change here: 

 

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8 hours ago, humanbackstop19 said:

Timing of being a quick pitch or not, the new NCAA rules for both the windup and set positions have him in an illegal pitching position.  If he's in a windup, his non-pivot foot has to be at or behind the front edge of the rubber with shoulders facing the batter.  If he's in the set, his shoulders need to be facing the respective foul line at the time of stopping and his pivot foot parallel and in contact ot the rubber.  Ruling:  Balk if anyone was on base, ball on the batter if not.  No more warnings.  

You have pinpointed a significant difference between FED and NCAA this year. That pitcher could well have his pivot foot on the rubber and back from the front edge. Then his free foot heal might comply with being on or inline with the front edge of the rubber and he would be legal in FED. In fact many hybrid pitchers in FED still remain legal by doing this. Aside from the fact that no one would mistake this for a set position in any real world sit would you really use the NCAA chest wording to call this illegal? But I do have a QP absent any backstory about batters trying to slow down a pitcher who works quick. That back story should be compelling absent any umpire involvement previously. It’s possible also that after letting this one go he got the next one. Sometimes you have to have a WTF to bear down on the out of the ordinary stuff. 

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There's no way that P is in compliance with FED/NCAA with the non-pivot foot.  Even in 2-man, the BU should be able to see that.  

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