Jump to content

Remove these ads by becoming a Premium Member
  • 0
Guest Fatcity

Pitch count question

Question

Guest Fatcity

Cannot seem to find answer in Fed Rules or Case Book.  If F1 pitches to a new batter after already reaching the state assoc.

limit is he now considered an ineligible player?  Some states (Washington) call for a forfeit, might the penalty vary state

to state?

 

Thanks

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

12 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Indeed, this is entirely state-dependent. 

 

Edited to add: in OH, we have no umpire involvement in this issue whatsoever...we don't keep track, we don't enforce, we don't report. If a team thinks there's been a violation, they take it up with the state on their own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remove these ads by becoming a Premium Member
  • 0

Alternatively, if this is a tournament using NFHS (Fed) Rules as a foundation or base, then enforcement and penalty varies per tournament

Example: If the state of Arizona has a Fed limit on pitches for AIA High School games, and we have a USA Baseball or Triple Crown or SouthWest Wood Bat tournament underway, then we are adhering to the pitching restrictions and limits of that tournament. The fact that it is played within Arizona doesn't override the tournament. Enforcements and penalties need to be inquired of the Tournament Director(s) (and not to be arbitrarily enforced / declared by the umpires).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
4 hours ago, Guest Fatcity said:

Cannot seem to find answer in Fed Rules or Case Book.  If F1 pitches to a new batter after already reaching the state assoc.

limit is he now considered an ineligible player?  Some states (Washington) call for a forfeit, might the penalty vary state

to state?

 

Thanks

 

I do not know. Even though I work games in Washington (Evergreen what up!) What part of the state are you in?

This is one of those where we have been instructed to continue calling the game. Make note of it at the time of the possible infraction. And send a report to our assignor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Mr. Fatcity, the pitching restrictions do vary state-by-state because the NFHS delegates the authority to each state to set its own pitching policy—

2018 NFHS rule 6-1

ART. 6 . . . Each state association shall have a pitching restriction policy based on the number of pitches thrown to afford pitchers a required rest period between pitching appearances.

And you are right about the penalty for violation of the rule in the state of Washington being a forfeit—at least it was as of February 2017—

From the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association (WIAA) 2017

What is the penalty if a pitcher exceeds the maximum daily limit?

Violations of the pitch count rule are considered in the same manner as a school using an ineligible player. The pitcher becomes ineligible to pitch when the maximum daily limit is reached. If the maximum daily limit is exceeded, the pitcher is ineligible and the contest will be forfeited. The offending team may appeal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

It turns out that the Ohio High School Athletic Association (OHSAA) has the same penalty for a violation of the pitching policy--

OHSAA Baseball Pitch Count Regulation Approved for 2017

January 19, 2017

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Details for a nationally-mandated pitch count restriction in high school baseball were approved Thursday by the Ohio High School Athletic Association Board of Directors at its January meeting. Last year, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) informed all states that they were required to have a pitch count limit instead of a regulation based on innings pitched over a certain number of days. Previously in Ohio high school baseball, a pitcher could pitch up to 10 innings in a three-day span. Each state was tasked with determining its own regulation.

The new OHSAA pitch count regulation calls for a maximum of 125 pitches permitted in a day, and contains several other details such as the number of days required between pitching appearances based on the number of pitches thrown. The regulation approved Thursday replaces OHSAA baseball regulation 1.7, which was approved last year and indicated that details for the pitch count regulation would be finalized in January.

Regulation 1.76) Any player pitching during a period in which rest is required is considered to be pitching as an ineligible player.

Note: Any victorious contest in which an ineligible player is participating will result in forfeiture of the contest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
2 hours ago, Senor Azul said:

From the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association (WIAA) 2017

What is the penalty if a pitcher exceeds the maximum daily limit?

Violations of the pitch count rule are considered in the same manner as a school using an ineligible player. The pitcher becomes ineligible to pitch when the maximum daily limit is reached. If the maximum daily limit is exceeded, the pitcher is ineligible and the contest will be forfeited. The offending team may appeal.

Not 100% sure mind you. But I believe that Washington allows a pitcher to end an at bat even though the number has been reached. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

2017 Washington Interscholastic Activities Association (WIAA)

Approved Baseball Pitch Count Rule

Frequently Asked Questions

Will a pitcher be able to complete an at bat regardless of the pitch count?

A pitcher is not allowed to exceed the highest pitch count limit. If close to the limit, the pitcher must either be replaced prior to the batter stepping up to the plate or during the at-bat.

Will umpires back up the pitch count?

It is not the responsibility of the umpires to enforce the pitching rule and umpires will not mediate pitch counts. All concerns about pitch counts need to be addressed by the league.

What is the penalty if a pitcher exceeds the maximum daily limit?

Violations of the pitch count rule are considered in the same manner as a school using an ineligible player. The pitcher becomes ineligible to pitch when the maximum daily limit is reached. If the maximum daily limit is exceeded, the pitcher is ineligible and the contest will be forfeited. The offending team may appeal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Thankfully in CA we are not involved in this issue. If a coach feels the other team violated the rule, they can submit an appeal to their school/league and they handle the issue.

We dodged a bullet on that one. I have no interest in officiating pitch counts in HS baseball... bad enough in LL, but at least there I understand the coaches (dads) not fully understanding all the pitching rules.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

2017 NFHS Baseball Rules Interpretations SITUATION 10: The home team believes the visiting team’s pitcher has violated the state’s pitch-count policy by exceeding the maximum number of pitches as his team leads in the sixth inning, 8-0. The home team asks the plate umpire to forfeit the game or, at a minimum, have the pitcher removed as a pitcher. RULING: Each state association will set its own regulations and protocols for violation of Rule 6-1-6. The umpire should suggest the coach contact and/or notify the state association. (6-1-6)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

So, though pitch counts are supposed to, in principle, protect pitchers, there is actually no enforceable mechanism to prevent a pitcher from throwing 300 pitches five days in a row, since the umpire is not required to enforce the rule.   So, the pitcher keeps pitching, and keeps doing so, until someone decides to complain to the league, at which point, upon evidentiary hearings, the league may determine the pitcher's team must forfeit those games.   Which, of course, doesn't actually undo the damage the rule is supposed to prevent.

This is the baseball equivalent of traffic camera enforcement....yeah, you can keep driving 150 mph...we'll send you a ticket in the mail in a few weeks....hope you didn't kill anyone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
6 hours ago, beerguy55 said:

So, though pitch counts are supposed to, in principle, protect pitchers, there is actually no enforceable mechanism to prevent a pitcher from throwing 300 pitches five days in a row, since the umpire is not required to enforce the rule.   So, the pitcher keeps pitching, and keeps doing so, until someone decides to complain to the league, at which point, upon evidentiary hearings, the league may determine the pitcher's team must forfeit those games.   Which, of course, doesn't actually undo the damage the rule is supposed to prevent.

This is the baseball equivalent of traffic camera enforcement....yeah, you can keep driving 150 mph...we'll send you a ticket in the mail in a few weeks....hope you didn't kill anyone.

I'd suspect that some states have penalties beyond the forfeiting of games. Maybe suspension of the players and coaches involved. Maybe fines against the team. Maybe just a public shaming throughout the state baseball community.

I don't think any AD would enjoy knowing his baseball coach blatantly disregarded a safety rule in the hopes of not being caught.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×