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NFHS Catcher Blocking Plate

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This was a play discussed at the state meeting:

Runner on 2nd, base hit, R2 attempts to score.  The throw comes in from the outfield for play at the plate.  The catcher was in legal fielding position prior to the throw (not blocking the plate).  The throw took the catcher up the 3rd base line and now the runner and catcher collide without the catcher having possession of the ball, basically a train wreck.  The runner from 2nd falls down and the hustling pitcher was backing up the play picked up the ball and tagged R2 out before he reached the plate.  Under NFHS rules should this be called obstruction since the catcher did not have possession of the ball?

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1 hour ago, Guest Coach said:

This was a play discussed at the state meeting:

Runner on 2nd, base hit, R2 attempts to score.  The throw comes in from the outfield for play at the plate.  The catcher was in legal fielding position prior to the throw (not blocking the plate).  The throw took the catcher up the 3rd base line and now the runner and catcher collide without the catcher having possession of the ball, basically a train wreck.  The runner from 2nd falls down and the hustling pitcher was backing up the play picked up the ball and tagged R2 out before he reached the plate.  Under NFHS rules should this be called obstruction since the catcher did not have possession of the ball?

Yes, if the catcher denied access to home plate prior to securely possessing the ball.

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2018 NFHS Case Book Play 2.22.1 Situation C:  A runner is advancing to score when F7 throws home. F2 completely blocks home plate with his lower leg/knee while (a) in possession of the ball or (b) while juggling and attempting to secure the ball or (c) before the ball has reached F2. RULING:  Legal in (a); obstruction in (b) and (c) if the catcher denied access to home plate prior to possessing the ball.

2018 NFHS Case Book Play 8.3.2 Situation C:  F2 is in the path between third base and home plate while waiting to receive a thrown ball. R3 advances from third and runs into the catcher, after which R3 is tagged out. RULING:  Obstruction. F2 cannot be in the base path without the ball in his possession, nor can he be in the base path waiting for a ball to arrive without giving the runner some access to home plate.

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2 minutes ago, Matt said:

Uh, no, it's not.

I saw the case book quote above my post but not until after I posted. If that's the way FED wants it called, fine... But I also don't agree with it.

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3 minutes ago, jonathantullos said:

I saw the case book quote above my post but not until after I posted. If that's the way FED wants it called, fine... But I also don't agree with it.

This isn't interference in any code. What did the runner do illegally?

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6 minutes ago, Matt said:

This isn't interference in any code. What did the runner do illegally?

Oh. LOL Sorry, I meant obstruction (it's been a long day).

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12 hours ago, jonathantullos said:

Yeah, sorry about that. Obstruction, not interference. I also read the case study quote wrong. Like I said, long day.

The umpire mantra also works well on this board: "Pause, Read, React":)

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19 hours ago, jonathantullos said:

I saw the case book quote above my post but not until after I posted. If that's the way FED wants it called, fine... But I also don't agree with it.

The runner scores easily if there's no contact, yes? Who is at fault for the contact in this case? The catcher. He's in the way due to a bad and/or late throw. You can't penalize the runner by letting him be out due to the catcher wrongly impeding his path. Why should the defense be rewarded there? Just calling this a baseball play, as I've heard in the field, is wrong. How you explain that to a coach, I have no idea.

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