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Guest Dennis

Coach on field

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Guest Dennis

For Cal Ripken/Babe Ruth Baseball specifically, but I'll take any rules on the matter I can find...during his team's defensive inning, is the coach allowed on the field, in fair territory, to discuss with the umpire a ruling or ask about a call?  Not referring to mound visits.  Does it matter whether time has been granted?  In this instance, a manager of a team in the field ran out to 2B at the conclusion of the play without time being granted to question a call.  Please tell me there's a rule that addresses coming on the field without being granted permission or time.  

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Shirley, you jest, Mr. Rich Ives. Once again I must reiterate for you what the OP asked. “For Cal Ripken/Babe Ruth Baseball specifically, but I'll take any rules on the matter I can find...” That’s what I did—I responded to the question (and I think it was a very good answer) and once again you did not.

Since you like to quibble so much, why didn’t you quibble with Mr. maven’s response to this question? The OP very clearly asked for help with a Cal Ripken/Babe Ruth rule. So Mr. maven replies with a reference to a FED rule and it was not even cited completely—it was simply just “FED has a rule.”

Not only did I give a Babe Ruth League related reply but one could extrapolate from it where to find the answer for one’s own local league. I do not think that the Willamette code that I quoted is the only one in existence--I checked several local leagues’ websites before posting and they all have some kind of Code of Conduct rules.

 

 

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FED (HS rules) has a rule addressing that. The coach would be warned and ejected for the next offense.

I would handle it similarly for other codes.

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3 hours ago, Guest Dennis said:

For Cal Ripken/Babe Ruth Baseball specifically, but I'll take any rules on the matter I can find...during his team's defensive inning, is the coach allowed on the field, in fair territory, to discuss with the umpire a ruling or ask about a call?  Not referring to mound visits.  Does it matter whether time has been granted?  In this instance, a manager of a team in the field ran out to 2B at the conclusion of the play without time being granted to question a call.  Please tell me there's a rule that addresses coming on the field without being granted permission or time.  

There is. Don't go there if the play is over.

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5 hours ago, Guest Dennis said:

but I'll take any rules on the matter I can find...

Are you asking as an umpire? A coach? A parent/observer? 

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HOW the coach came running out could have an impact on HOW to handle it. 

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Dennis, the following text is taken from the Willamette Valley Babe Ruth Coaches Packet (Oregon)—

During the course of a game, a coach, player or parent will not be allowed to approach an umpire for the purpose of disputing a judgment call or decision. Umpires will handle unsportsmanlike behavior in accordance with Competition/Sportsmanship Committee guidelines. A Head Coach may approach an Umpire for the purpose of discussing a rule interpretation or for clarification. At all times, the coach will show respect to the umpire and maintain his obligation as the team leader to provide an example of good sportsmanship for the players and other event participants. No coach, parent, or event participant will be allowed to shout abusive or disrespectful remarks criticizing a player’s, coach’s or umpire’s performance or judgment. WVBR recognizes that errors and poor decisions are a part of the game and it is important that participants are provided an environment where they can succeed and fall free from the fear of public ridicule and embarrassment. The coaches are obligated to provide an example of control over emotions and speech. These behavior standards are to be maintained before, during, and after games as well as any sanctioned league function.

When a major offense of unsportsmanlike behavior occurs (i.e. charging an umpire over a judgment call, throwing a bat, malicious contact, etc…) it is understood that all umpires have the authority to immediately eject the appropriate individual(s). It is important that any coach, player or spectator, not be allowed to continue with unsportsmanlike behavior. Umpires must remember to not take the game into their own hands and strong hand a coach/player/spectator. Coaches have been instructed that they may ask for clarification of a call so long as it pertains to rule interpretations. If a coach politely asks an umpire “how they saw a specific call”, that is also appropriate. However, should a coach come to argue a judgment call, the umpire will not acknowledge the argument and ask the Head Coach to return to the dugout. Note: The Head Coach is the only coach allowed to speak with the umpires. Should an Assistant Coach come out to dispute any call during a game, the umpire shall take the following actions: 1. 1st time: The umpire will ask the Head Coach to restrain his Assistant Coach immediately and advise the Head Coach of the consequence should the Assistant Coach refuse to do so immediately. 2. 2nd time:The umpire will restrict the Head Coach and the affected Assistant Coach to the dugout for the duration of the game.

If a player, coach or manager leaves his position to argue a call, he should be warned to immediately return or be ejected.

 

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13 minutes ago, Senor Azul said:

Dennis, the following text is taken from the Willamette Valley Babe Ruth Coaches Packet (Oregon)—

During the course of a game, a coach, player or parent will not be allowed to approach an umpire for the purpose of disputing a judgment call or decision. Umpires will handle unsportsmanlike behavior in accordance with Competition/Sportsmanship Committee guidelines. A Head Coach may approach an Umpire for the purpose of discussing a rule interpretation or for clarification. At all times, the coach will show respect to the umpire and maintain his obligation as the team leader to provide an example of good sportsmanship for the players and other event participants. No coach, parent, or event participant will be allowed to shout abusive or disrespectful remarks criticizing a player’s, coach’s or umpire’s performance or judgment. WVBR recognizes that errors and poor decisions are a part of the game and it is important that participants are provided an environment where they can succeed and fall free from the fear of public ridicule and embarrassment. The coaches are obligated to provide an example of control over emotions and speech. These behavior standards are to be maintained before, during, and after games as well as any sanctioned league function.

When a major offense of unsportsmanlike behavior occurs (i.e. charging an umpire over a judgment call, throwing a bat, malicious contact, etc…) it is understood that all umpires have the authority to immediately eject the appropriate individual(s). It is important that any coach, player or spectator, not be allowed to continue with unsportsmanlike behavior. Umpires must remember to not take the game into their own hands and strong hand a coach/player/spectator. Coaches have been instructed that they may ask for clarification of a call so long as it pertains to rule interpretations. If a coach politely asks an umpire “how they saw a specific call”, that is also appropriate. However, should a coach come to argue a judgment call, the umpire will not acknowledge the argument and ask the Head Coach to return to the dugout. Note: The Head Coach is the only coach allowed to speak with the umpires. Should an Assistant Coach come out to dispute any call during a game, the umpire shall take the following actions: 1. 1st time: The umpire will ask the Head Coach to restrain his Assistant Coach immediately and advise the Head Coach of the consequence should the Assistant Coach refuse to do so immediately. 2. 2nd time:The umpire will restrict the Head Coach and the affected Assistant Coach to the dugout for the duration of the game.

If a player, coach or manager leaves his position to argue a call, he should be warned to immediately return or be ejected.

 

That's nice but it's a league rule, not a BR rule.

 

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16 hours ago, Rich Ives said:

There is.

Mr. Rich Ives, can you please provide a cite? Thank you.

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1 hour ago, LRZ said:

Mr. Rich Ives, can you please provide a cite? Thank you.

Promise to not be an OOO with it.

LL Regulation XIV(d)

And reinforced  in 4.19(b ) for protests.

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23 minutes ago, Rich Ives said:

Promise to not be an OOO with it.

Only if it's you I'm dealing with, 'cause you know better! ;)

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I kinda feel bad for Mr. Ives, dealing with all these LL umpires all these years!  I wish I could go do a game and give him a different perspective of things!

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First things first and this is a pet peeve of mine that a lot of umps let go.

Do not allow coaches to sit on a bucket outside the dugout or stand outside the dugout. You are asking for trouble and they do not belong there 

As far as what you were asking about. I always address it at the plate meeting when I say coaches if you would like to discuss a call please call for time and wait for it to be granted. This stops coaches from coming out while play is still going and teaches them that I am their daddy and they better ask my permission lol

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4 hours ago, KCKUMP said:

As far as what you were asking about. I always address it at the plate meeting when I say coaches if you would like to discuss a call please call for time and wait for it to be granted. This stops coaches from coming out while play is still going and teaches them that I am their daddy and they better ask my permission lol

A lot of it could be in the wording too.  I tell them to wait until play is relaxed and "ask for time".  Once time is granted by me or my partner, go to the umpire that made the call.

It seems as though this has helped as a reinforcement that "the coach asks, and we grant" time.  Asking a coach to call for time could imply that he has a little more authority than he actually does.  Semantics?  Absofreakinlutley.  Has it worked for me?  You bet.

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13 hours ago, Tborze said:

I kinda feel bad for Mr. Ives, dealing with all these LL umpires all these years!  I wish I could go do a game and give him a different perspective of things!

I've had umpires from across the spectrum.

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5 hours ago, Aging_Arbiter said:

A lot of it could be in the wording too.  I tell them to wait until play is relaxed and "ask for time".  Once time is granted by me or my partner, go to the umpire that made the call.

It seems as though this has helped as a reinforcement that "the coach asks, and we grant" time.  Asking a coach to call for time could imply that he has a little more authority than he actually does.  Semantics?  Absofreakinlutley.  Has it worked for me?  You bet.

This was a good eye opener for me in a game when I said to one of my players "call time", and the ump talked to me after the inning.  He said "ask for time"...coaches and players can't call time.   I knew that, and explained that, but it didn't dawn on me, until then, that by saying "call" instead of "ask" that I was effectively telling the players that it's up to them, not the umpire.   After that, my players have been instructed to "ask", or "request"....even the inflection has changed from "Time" to "Time?"

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17 hours ago, KCKUMP said:

First things first and this is a pet peeve of mine that a lot of umps let go.

Do not allow coaches to sit on a bucket outside the dugout or stand outside the dugout. You are asking for trouble and they do not belong there 

As far as what you were asking about. I always address it at the plate meeting when I say coaches if you would like to discuss a call please call for time and wait for it to be granted. This stops coaches from coming out while play is still going and teaches them that I am their daddy and they better ask my permission lol

 

12 hours ago, Aging_Arbiter said:

A lot of it could be in the wording too.  I tell them to wait until play is relaxed and "ask for time".  Once time is granted by me or my partner, go to the umpire that made the call.

It seems as though this has helped as a reinforcement that "the coach asks, and we grant" time.  Asking a coach to call for time could imply that he has a little more authority than he actually does.  Semantics?  Absofreakinlutley.  Has it worked for me?  You bet.

At upper levels I wouldn't address the bolded in a plate meeting. Emulate @lawump's plate meeting which you should have seen on this site. I don't do it even with daddy coaches but you might think it helps.

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