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stl_ump

Losing contact with the rubber during the windup?

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During the windup (no runners on) I had a pitcher continually, as he went through the motions of his windup (with his pivot foot), start in front of the rubber (in contact) step to the side of the rubber (4 or 5" off of it) and then back in front and then make the pitch. 

Rule 5.07 doesn't address the issue of doing this.  At least not what I have seen. 

Though it does say in the comment section:

Rule 5.07(a) Comment: ...The pitcher may not take a second step toward home plate with either foot or otherwise reset his pivot foot in his delivery of the pitch.  under Rule 6.02(a); if the bases are unoccupied it is an illegal pitch under Rule 6.02(b).

We let it go as this was a 10u travel team and none of the coaches were complaining.

On a side note, several people in the stands we noticing it and vocally saying "that's a balk".  I though about agreeing with them and calling it and having all the invisible runners move up a base... but I thought better of it since they were already down by 10. :-)

 

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The purpose of this rule is to prevent F1 from "running into the pitch."  It doesn't sound like that is what he was doing.

 

I agree with your decision IN THIS GAME.

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Let’s take a closer look at the rest of that 1887 rule prohibiting pitchers from running into the pitch. Here’s the official interpretation of that rule (actually is part of the official rules) and also can be found in the book The Rules of the Game A Compilation of the Rules of Baseball 1845-1900 by Eric Miklich.

The New Pitching Rule

The changes made in the rules governing the delivery of the ball to the bat form the most radical of the amendments made to the code, and by far the most important. In the first place the size of the pitcher’s box has been reduced from seven feet in length to five feet six, thus rendering it almost impossible for him to take more than one forward step in delivering, even if he were not expressly forbidden to do so. The new rule also requires the pitcher to keep one foot on the rear line of his position, and this foot he cannot lift until he has completed the forward throwing or pitching movement of his arm in delivery. The rule also says that he shall not “make more than one step in such delivery.” Moreover, in taking his stand in the box, preparatory to the delivery of the ball, he must hold the ball fairly in front of his body, and in sight of the Umpire…

 

So, questions for Mr. noumpere—when, if ever, was that rule changed to allow the pitcher to lift his pivot foot in an extra step to begin the pitching motion? In the OP the pitcher may not be running into the pitch but isn’t he (after taking the extra step to the side of the rubber and then returning to the rubber) actually walking into the pitch?

 

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1 hour ago, Senor Azul said:

Let’s take a closer look at the rest of that 1887 rule prohibiting pitchers from running into the pitch. Here’s the official interpretation of that rule (actually is part of the official rules) and also can be found in the book The Rules of the Game A Compilation of the Rules of Baseball 1845-1900 by Eric Miklich.

The New Pitching Rule

The changes made in the rules governing the delivery of the ball to the bat form the most radical of the amendments made to the code, and by far the most important. In the first place the size of the pitcher’s box has been reduced from seven feet in length to five feet six, thus rendering it almost impossible for him to take more than one forward step in delivering, even if he were not expressly forbidden to do so. The new rule also requires the pitcher to keep one foot on the rear line of his position, and this foot he cannot lift until he has completed the forward throwing or pitching movement of his arm in delivery. The rule also says that he shall not “make more than one step in such delivery.” Moreover, in taking his stand in the box, preparatory to the delivery of the ball, he must hold the ball fairly in front of his body, and in sight of the Umpire…

 

So, questions for Mr. noumpere—when, if ever, was that rule changed to allow the pitcher to lift his pivot foot in an extra step to begin the pitching motion? In the OP the pitcher may not be running into the pitch but isn’t he (after taking the extra step to the side of the rubber and then returning to the rubber) actually walking into the pitch?

 

He, if aRHP, is walking into 3B not the pitch. The literal rule does not allow a pitcher to lift his pivot foot. But CSAFP allow a pitcher to re position his perpendicular (normal windup), angled (hybrid windup) to a sideways contact with the rubber by lifting it and turning it. This reposition is not a step. Most sideways windup pitchers don't have to lift since they are already parallel but some do anyway. The advice is to judge walking INTO the pitch , not to judge breaking pivot foot contact with the rubber.

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12 hours ago, Senor Azul said:

So, questions for Mr. noumpere—when, if ever, was that rule changed to allow the pitcher to lift his pivot foot in an extra step to begin the pitching motion? In the OP the pitcher may not be running into the pitch but isn’t he (after taking the extra step to the side of the rubber and then returning to the rubber) actually walking into the pitch?

Never changed to allow a step.  Changed by interp to allow "repositioning" -- and really only needed because some OOO took the rule book wording too literally.

And, I'm not saying the OP couldn't be judged to be illegal -- I'm saying I (personally) am okay with a no-call in this game:

On 7/10/2018 at 12:53 PM, stl_ump said:

a 10u travel team and none of the coaches we (sic) complaining.

 

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